Project

Researcher Mental Health Observatory: ReMO COST Action CA19117

Goal: The ReMO COST Action focuses on wellbeing and mental health within academia, a theme of strategic importance for the European Research Area. Previous research shows that low levels of wellbeing and mental health problems have a negative impact on individual, team and organizational performance, triggering significant costs. In addition, institutional context, organizational structure and culture, as well as managerial practices have significant impact on wellbeing and health of employees. Therefore, general insights on the causes of workplace wellbeing and mental health need to be refined with contextual specifics (i.e. in academia) in order to develop tailored, effective and efficient prevention and action programs.

Date: 1 November 2020 - 31 October 2024

Updates
0 new
16
Recommendations
0 new
19
Followers
1 new
30
Reads
10 new
358

Project log

Brian Cahill
added a research item
After a long period of relative neglect, the mental well‐being and the mental health of researchers and employees in academia are increasingly entering the limelight. The growing body of evidence suggests that a high number of doctoral researchers work under elevated levels of stress and frustration, and that this has a significant impact not only on their personal health and research output, but also on their future career development. In this paper, therefore, we first discuss what a dystopian and a utopian learning journey of early career researchers may look like from a well‐being perspective. Subsequently, and based on extensive dialogues with more than 250 researchers and professionals active in the researcher mental health domain, we highlight a number of key focal points that both early career researchers, their supervisors, and institutions alike should consider when it comes to planning and delivering mental health oriented educational activities for doctoral researchers.
Gokce Gokalp
added a research item
We will be holding a panel discussion as members of the COST Action CA19117: “Researcher Mental Health” (ReMO) which focuses on well-being and mental health within academia, a theme of strategic importance for the European Research Area. By working at the European, national, institutional and individual levels ReMO network aims to create institutional environments that foster mental health and well-being, reduce mental health stigma, and empower researchers when it comes to well-being at work.
Brian Cahill
added an update
The ReMO COST Action focuses on wellbeing and mental health within academia. It aims at building evidence on both the prevalence of the issue and the best practices in, and then at challenging policy, institutions, and individuals to do their bit place to foster health research environments. You can find a description of the ReMO objectives in the ReMO Manifesto.
WHO CAN BECOME AN AMBASSADOR?
This training school is for anyone who wants to contribute actively to the objectives described in the manifesto. Whether you have already taken action for mental health in other contexts or you want to get started, we encourage you to apply to the ReMO Ambassador Programme and associated Training School.
WHAT WILL THE TRAINING SCHOOL COVER?
The Training School will offer a mix of lectures, workshops, and exercises that will lead you to develop an action plan to improve mental well-being at your organization, among your peers or within your country. You will get the opportunity to learn and think about the resources available to help individuals and the tools you need to discuss mental health within your institutions or with policy-makers. You will hear inspiring stories of people who have created peer-to-peer mentoring programs or initiated change within their institutions or countries.
WHAT ARE THE COSTS?
The ReMO network will offer travel grants to participants to cover travel and other expenses related to the training school. Applicants who do not qualify for a grant or who cannot travel are encouraged to register for online participation.
WHERE WILL IT TAKE PLACE?
The training school will be a hybrid event with a face-to-face meeting in Grenoble with a live online meeting available for people who cannot travel to France.
The participants who can travel will come to Grenoble Ecole de Management, Grenoble, France. Grenoble is a city surrounded by three chains of mountains and is called the Capital of the Alps. Grenoble is also the Green Capital of Europe 2022, the home of the Synchrotron, a city where Artificial Intelligence, Technology, and Engineering are at the core of conversations. It is 1h from the airport Lyon St Exupéry, or 2h from the Geneva International Airport by bus.
The facilities of Grenoble Ecole de Management are accessible for people in wheelchairs. In case visual or hearing aid is required, please mention it in the application so we can accommodate your needs. The event will follow the COVID19 regulations of Grenoble Ecole de Management (refreshing the air, using gel, wearing masks). Part of the event will take place outdoors.
HOW TO APPLY?
ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE
Local Organizer: Dr. Stéphanie Gauttier,  Grenoble École de Management, Grenoble, France.
Program organization committee:
Dr. Gábor Kismihók, Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology, Hannover, Germany;
Dr. Brian Cahill, Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology, Hannover, Germany;
Dr. Olga Vvedenskaya MD, Dragonfly Mental Health, Germany/USA;
Dr. Mayya Sundukova, Mare Curie Alumni Association Career Development Working Group;
Prof. Dr. Christiane Schwieren, University of Heidelberg, Germany;
Dr. Lorena Cudris Torres, Fundacion Universitaria del Area Andina, Bogota. Colombia;
Dr. Mohammed Nadeem Adi, Bilkent University, Turkey;
Prof. Gahbiche Msakni Hajer, Université de Kairouan, Tunisia;
Mr. Gabriel Saravalli-Burchfield, Columbia University, New York;
Ms. Shaikh Sumayya, Grenoble École de Management, Grenoble, France.
 
Brian Cahill
added a research item
Increasing awareness of Researcher Mental Health has emerged through journalistic articles in the most prominent science journals, in discussions among early-career researchers on social media and bottom-up initiatives of early-career researchers. Recent research findings on the prevalence of mental illness among academics and early career researchers, such as, the seminal paper of Levecque et al. (Research Policy, 2017), have received much attention. Although much work remains to be done to destigmatise mental health among research stakeholders, many research institutions and research funders are beginning to take action to design institutional practices that support researcher wellbeing and ensure a positive research culture within the research environment. This session will include speakers, who have formulated clear policy recommendations about how to foster supportive and inclusive research environments. The Researcher Mental Health and Well-Being Manifesto (Kismihok et al., 2021, https://zenodo.org/record/5559806) is a call to identify which practices and actions are effective at creating research environments that foster mental health and wellbeing, reduce mental health stigma, and empower researchers when it comes to well-being in their workplace. The ReMO COST Action provides a framework for involving a network of researchers, practitioners and institutional stakeholders in achieving the objectives of the Manifesto through designing actions and initiatives at the policy, institutional, community and individual levels. The Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers was updated in 2019 and commits research institutions in the UK to obligations with regard to research environment and culture, employment, and professional and career development. In the updated Concordat, mental health became a key theme of how institutions, funders, supervisors and researchers can promote a healthy research environment. The career outlook and working conditions of PhD candidates and postdoctoral researchers have been addressed by the Marie Curie Alumni Association and Eurodoc in the Declaration on Sustainable Researcher Careers (Kismihok et al., 2019, https://zenodo.org/record/3082245) with recommendations to redesign the education of early-career researchers, so that they are empowered to build a more vibrant European Research Area, whether they make a career inside or outside academia. The dysfunctional nature of career progression at the postdoctoral level has been addressed by the OECD report on “Reducing the precarity of academic research careers” (2021, https://doi.org/10.1787/23074957) with recommendations “to improve working conditions and professional development, better link funding to human resource policies, make governance more inclusive, promote equal opportunities and diversity, improve human resource management, promote inter-sectoral and international mobility, and develop the evidence base on research careers”. Finally, the session will include the perspective of a practitioner from a Counselling Service within an academic institution, who provides psychological, psychotherapeutic and psychiatric services to academic staff and students based on evidence-based interventions.
Brian Cahill
added an update
25th-26th August, 2022, Budapest, Hungary.
THEME
"Bridging Research and Practice in Fostering Healthy Academic Workplaces"
The ReMO COST Action focuses on wellbeing and mental health within academia, a theme of strategic importance for the European Research Area and beyond. We would like to invite our fellow researchers and practitioners to critically think about Bridging Research and Practice in Fostering Healthy Academic Workplaces. How can stakeholders in the research environment contribute to tackling this challenge in a rapidly changing world? We therefore hope for an inspiring conference with presentations, workshops and keynotes that will not only showcase the newest findings about the cognitive, motivational, and emotional aspects of Researcher Mental Health and Well-being, but will also be a place to discuss the global challenges that shape the present and will define the future of our research workplaces.
The conference will be a hybrid conference within the context of the ReMO COST Action with free online participation and in-person attendance at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary.
OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE
The ReMO 2022 programme committee warmly invites you to participate in the exploration of the theme “Bridging Research and Practice in Fostering Healthy Academic Workplaces”. We aim to collaborate with each other and share and discuss the latest research and practice in Researcher Mental Health and Well-being as we work to achieve the objectives of the Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto:
  1. At the community level: Supporting grassroots initiatives; peer-to-peer support actions; a person-centred approach to training and career management; and anecdotal evidence collection.
  2. At the institutional level: Recognizing mental health and well-being issues; sharing best practices across institutions; development of fair and personalised research performance assessment; addressing well-being in doctoral and staff professionalisation; and supporting change initiatives at the organisational level.
  3. At the policy level: ongoing dialogue between all relevant stakeholders; systematic and structured data collection for evidence-based policy making; dissemination of state-of-the-art evidence and tools addressing mental health; and revising the academic reward system.
We will have several keynote speakers and expert-led workshops, paper presentations, interactive poster sessions, and round table discussions.
VENUE
The ReMO 2022 Conference will take place at the Central European University, Budapest.
SUBMISSION DETAILS
All papers will be assessed by blind peer review and are selected based on merit and relevance. Submissions must be made online using the EasyChair abstract submission system by April 18 17:00 CEST: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=remo2022
Full instructions for submitting your abstract are provided in the online system. The deadline for submission of abstracts by April 18.
The abstract template can be downloaded here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Qe9aaBDifgHhm24b4lfjtN9GCO2z0Bj1
All abstracts must be between 500 and 1000 words excluding title, references and tables/graphs. Names and institutions/organisations of authors should not be included in the text of the abstracts to facilitate the blind peer review process but entered separately in the online system.
Abstracts should address one of the categories below:
  1. Scientific and practitioners' research presentations
  • Bottom-up and community-driven Interventions: Assessing the effectiveness and practical implementation of bottom-up and community-led interventions, such as, counselling support, peer-to-peer support, online networks and activities, mindfulness, yoga and other tools for mental health.
  • Institutional interventions and policies: Assessing the effectiveness and practical implementation of interventions and policies within institutions to address mental health, understand prevalence within institutions, reduce stigma and mandate support within institutions will be brought together in order to create evidence-based understanding of what ‘best practice’ looks like, what the practical challenges are and how they can be addressed, to share institutional learning and break down barriers and taboos in institutions recognising and addressing challenges within their workplace environments.
  • Policy-Level Insights: Research and initiatives providing insight on systemic issues beyond any particular organisation or discipline and bringing together cross-institutional evidence on the prevalence, characteristics of mental health within research workplaces, and what can be done at a system level.
  1. Workshop/hands-on practices for enhancing researcher mental health and well-being that facilitate community feedback, development of experimental design and collaboration.
Abstracts will be published open access in a Book of Abstracts. Selected contributions will be invited to submit a paper to a special journal issue.
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Paper Sessions
  • The Paper should relate to the scientific objectives of ReMO as described in the Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto.
  • Relevance of the topic to the work of one of ReMO’s three Working Groups (System Level, Institutional Level, and Local Actors)
  • Clarity of research question(s) and/or focus of enquiry/discussions/workshops
  • Applicants coming from Inclusiveness Target Countries (ITCs) will be given priority
  • Robustness of analytical and/or theoretical framework
  • Significance for researcher mental health practice, policy and/or theory
All submissions must directly relate to the field of researcher mental health with a focus on practices and policies in place to address researcher mental health and may offer critical analysis or review of issues for researchers of all career stages.
Participants will be notified of acceptance decisions by May 20th.
PROGRAMME COMMITTEE
Gábor Kismihók, Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology, Hannover, Germany.
Brian Cahill, Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology, Hannover, Germany.
Stéphanie Gauttier, Grenoble École de  Management, Grenoble, France.
Janet Metcalfe, Vitae, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
Stefan T. Mol, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Darragh McCashin, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
Carla van der Voort, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Dilara Özel, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.
Gabriel Saravalli-Burchfield, Columbia University, New York, USA.
Gökce Gökalp, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.
Lorena Cudris Torres, Fundación Universitaria del Área Andina, Bogotá, Colombia.
Maria Bostenaru Dan, "Ion Mincu" University of Architecture and Urbanism, Romania.
Mayya Sundukova, Fundación Biofísica Bizkaia / Biofisika Bizkaia Fundazioa, Bilbao, Spain.
Olga Vvedenskaya, Dragonfly Mental Health, Germany/USA.
Sabina Osmanovic,  University of Montenegro, Crna Gora, Montenegro.
REGISTRATION
Registration will open for both physical and virtual participation at a later stage.
The ReMO COST Action covers the main expenses related to the conference and there will be no charge for either physical or virtual participation. The capacity of the venue will dictate a maximum number of physical participants. There may be a charge to cover the cost of the conference dinner and other meals. Details will be made available when registration opens.
TRAVEL GRANTS
Some Travel Grants will be funded by the ReMO COST Action with priority given to ensuring the participation of:
  • Speakers
  • Early Career Investigators (below 40 years of age)
  • Researchers from Inclusiveness Target Countries (ITCs)
  • ReMO COST Action Working Group Members
  • Ensuring gender balance
Details will be made available when registration opens.
 
Brian Cahill
added a research item
The ReMO COST Action stands in solidarity with the people of Ukraine. We add our voices to the joint declaration of Eurodoc and the Marie Curie Alumni Association and strongly condemn the Russian Federation's acts of violence and aggression against the people of Ukraine. We also concur with the COST Association's call for international efforts to help ensure the safety of Ukrainian researchers and innovators. ReMO is a closely-knit network and we are deeply concerned about the safety of two of our network members based at the International Humanitarian University in Odessa. There are practical ways that we can support displaced Ukrainian scientists: 1. If your lab is willing to support displaced Ukrainian scientists, please enter information on this form. 2. Please ask your university/research institution/research funder to add itself to this list as being willing to provide funding, accommodation, visiting researcher status or any other form of help: 3. Support the call of the Inspireurope partners on European Governments and EU institutions to act quickly to support researchers at risk and to actively protect academic freedom against authoritarianism: 4. Support ScienceforUkraine at https://twitter.com/Sci_for_Ukraine and http://scienceforukraine.eu/ We keep in mind that the actions of the Russian regime are not representative of the Russian people and we welcome and support the open letter from Russian academics and science journalists calling for peace. Our COST Action is focussed on international cooperation and communication within Europe. We believe in inclusion, dialogue, peace, and support the advancement of society through education and research. We are deeply concerned about the physical and mental health and safety of the Ukrainian people, especially those most vulnerable, including the elderly, the children, and the sick. We call on the Russian Federation to cease its attack on Ukraine.
Brian Cahill
added a research item
Program duševnega zdravja in dobrega počutja raziskovalcev 11. oktober 2021 Dokument je bil odobren za objavo 8. oktobra 2021. Dokument je objavljen pod licenco CC BY 4.0 license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Brian Cahill
added a research item
L'acció ReMO COST és una xarxa amb participants de tots els nivells de la comunitat investigadora, i ha elaborat un Manifest de salut mental i benestar dels investigadors per evaluar com es pot nodrir i mantenir la bona salut mental i el benestar dels investigadors mitjançant iniciatives a nivell polític, institucional, comunitari i individual. Aquest manifest demana que totes les parts interessades de l'ecosistema de la recerca s'impliquin en el desenvolupament de polítiques que controlin, millorin i mantinguin el benestar i la salut mental en l'entorn de la recerca, definint els indicadors d'èxit i qualitat de forma global, donant suport a l'equilibri entre la vida laboral i familiar, la inclusió, i a que les carreres professionals en recerca sigui sostenibles i compatibles amb la vida familiar i personal.
Brian Cahill
added an update
Federica Bressan published an article, "New Podcast on Mental Health in Academia", in EuroScientist: https://www.euroscientist.com/new-podcast-on-mental-health-in-academia/
 
Brian Cahill
added a research item
عبارة عن شبكة من أصحاب المصلحة من جميع مستويات المجتمع البحثي التي قامت بصياغة بيان للباحث عن الصحة العقلية والرفاهية والذي يدعو إلى تقييم أفضل طريقة لتغذية واستدامة الصحة العقلية للباحثين ورفاهيتهم من خلال الإجراءات والمبادرات على مستوى السياسات والمؤسسات والمجتمعات والأفراد. يدعو هذا البيان جميع أصحاب المصلحة في النظام البحثي إلى المشاركة في تطوير السياسات التي ترصد وتحسن وتحافظ على الرفاهية والصحة العقلية في بيئة البحث ، وتحديد مقاييس أكثر شمولاً للنجاح والجودة ، ودعم التوازن بين العمل والحياة ، والشمولية ، والوظائف البحثية المستدامة الصديقة للأسرة.
Brian Cahill
added a research item
La Acción ReMO del programa COST es una red de colaboradores de todos los niveles de la comunidad científica que ha redactado un Manifiesto sobre la salud mental y el bienestar de los investigadores que requiere la evaluación sobre cómo se pueden nutrir y fomentar de la mejor forma la salud mental y el bienestar, a través de acciones e iniciativas a nivel político, institucional, comunitario e individual. Este manifiesto solicita a todos los grupos de interés en el ecosistema científico que se impliquen en el desarrollo de políticas que supervisen, mejoren y mantengan el bienestar y la salud mental en el entorno de la investigación, diseñando indicadores más amplios sobre el éxito y la calidad, que apoyen el equilibrio entre la vida laboral y la personal, la inclusión y carreras de investigación sostenibles y favorables para la familia.
Brian Cahill
added 3 research items
These documents are the result of a series of three online workshops held between 20th and 26th April 2021 by the Researcher Mental Health (ReMO) COST Action. The 2-hour long workshops focussed on engaging the ReMO community through developing recommendations for the Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto based on the specific impact priorities of each of ReMO's three Working Groups: Working Group 1: System level - the ERA working environment Working Group 2: Institutional level - Wellbeing Practices in Research Institutions Working Group 3: Local actors - Promoting researcher well-being on a practical level These workshops were based on the outcomes of a previous process to perform SWOT analyses and Impact analyses.The following procedure was executed: First, the working group chairs introduced the focus of each working group. Participants were randomly assigned to small parallel discussion groups. In four discussion rounds, participants identified actions to prioritise within the Manifesto and the agenda of the Working Group over project lifetime and populated the matrix of the padlet. Subsequently, through a plenary discussion the ideas recorded in the matrix were discussed, duplications and similar items were merged. As a result, the three Manifesto matrices for the three working groups were finalized and synthesized to a project level Manifesto matrix. The process aimed to distill a number of key themes and actions, which are critical for developing a model of doctoral education and more general research culture embracing researcher mental health as a key priority. This process led to the publication of the Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto. The audience’s responses were anonymous, and they were recorded in a padlet, whose contents are available here.
These documents are the result of a series of three online workshops held by the Researcher Mental Health (ReMO) COST Action that focussed on the specific impact priorities of each of ReMO's three Working Groups: Working Group 1: System level - the ERA working environment Working Group 2: Institutional level - Wellbeing Practices in Research Institutions Working Group 3: Local actors - Promoting researcher well-being on a practical level These three-hours long impact workshops were based on the outcomes of a previous process to perform SWOT analyses and followed the guidelines and methodology that the ReMO community adapted from the "Impact+ Exercise” that was originally developed for European Commissions’ Erasmus plus projects (https://www.erasmusplus.org.uk/impact-and-evaluation). In these workshops the following procedure was executed: First, participants established their impact targets for the ReMO network: the network (itself), the researcher, stakeholders, and the research system. These targets were derived from the methodological guidelines of the “Impact+ Exercise”, but participants tailored them to the context of ReMO. Participants, randomly assigned to small discussion rounds for brainstorming, identified the most important issues and topics when it comes to researcher mental health and well-being. They also associated those issues and topics with the impact targets. Outcomes were discussed in a plenary session with duplications and similar items (issues and topics) being merged. Participants went through a voting procedure. Every participant could distribute three votes across all topics and issues identified by all participants. Votes were counted and topics were ranked based on the number of votes they received. Participants discussed the ranking and generated an action plan for the ReMO Action, which also served as a guide for research and intervention development to improve researcher mental health. As a result, the three Impact matrices for the three working groups were finalized and synthesized to a project level Impact matrix. The process aimed to distill a number of key themes and actions, which are critical for developing a model of doctoral education and more general research culture embracing researcher mental health as a key priority. This process led to the publication of the Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto. The audience’s responses were anonymous, and they were recorded in a padlet, whose contents are available here. This work was performed within the framework of COST Action CA19117 - "Researcher Mental Health".
These documents are the result of a series of three online workshops held by the Researcher Mental Health (ReMO) COST Action that focussed on the specific impact priorities of each of ReMO's three Working Groups: Working Group 1: System level - the ERA working environment Working Group 2: Institutional level - Wellbeing Practices in Research Institutions Working Group 3: Local actors - Promoting researcher well-being on a practical level These 90 minutes long workshops developed SWOT analyses through engaging the ReMO community. In these workshops the following procedure was executed: Working groups were provided with empty SWOT matrices. Participants were randomly assigned to small parallel discussion groups. In four discussion rounds (one for each topic: Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats, each of them 15 mins long) participants populated their matrix. Subsequently, through a plenary discussion the ideas recorded in the matrix were discussed, duplications and similar items were merged. As a result, the three SWOT matrices for the three working groups were finalized and synthesized to a project level SWOT matrix. The process aimed to distill a number of key themes and actions, which are critical for developing a model of doctoral education and more general research culture embracing researcher mental health as a key priority. This process led to the publication of the Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto. The audience’s responses were anonymous, and they were recorded in a padlet, whose contents are available here. This work was performed within the framework of COST Action CA19117 - "Researcher Mental Health".
Brian Cahill
added a research item
The ReMO COST Action is a network of stakeholders from all levels of the research community that has drafted a Researcher Mental Health and Well-being Manifesto that calls for the assessment of how the mental health and well-being of researchers can best be nourished and sustained through actions and initiatives at the policy, institutional, community and individual levels. This manifesto calls for all stakeholders in the research ecosystem to engage in developing policies that monitor, improve, and maintain well-being and mental health in the research environment, delineating more encompassing metrics of success and quality, supporting work-life balance, inclusiveness, and family-friendly sustainable research careers. This work was performed within the framework of COST Action CA19117 - "Researcher Mental Health".
Brian Cahill
added an update
The COST Action on Researcher Mental Health (ReMO) invites you to the launch of the Researcher Mental Health Manifesto on Monday 11th October from 14:00-15:00 CET.
Recent studies show a high prevalence of mental health issues among researchers. The ReMO COST Action involves a growing network of 240 stakeholders, who work together to identify which practices and actions are effective at creating research environments that foster mental health and well-being, reduce mental health stigma, and empower researchers when it comes to well-being in their workplace. In this Researcher Mental Health Manifesto, we present the ReMO COST Action’s call to assess how the mental health and well-being of researchers can best be nourished and sustained through actions and initiatives at the policy, institutional, community and individual levels.
The Manifesto Launch is aimed at an audience of stakeholders that includes institutional leadership, policy makers, academics of all career stages, mental health practitioners, research career advisors and doctoral school directors.
The Researcher Mental Health Manifesto Launch will feature:
  • ReMO Action Chair, Dr. Gabor Kismihók TIB, Germany
  • ReMO Vice Chair, Dr. Stéphanie Gauttier, Grenoble Ecole de Management, France
  • Working Group 1 Chair, Dr. Janet Metcalfe, Vitae, UK
  • Working Group 2 Chair, Dr. Stefan Thomas Mol, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Working Group 3 Chair, Dr. Darragh McCashin, Dublin City University, Ireland.
For more information, please contact the ReMO Grant Manager:
Dr. Brian Cahill, Email: brian.cahill@tib.eu
 
Private Profile
added an update
Our virtual networking team currently has an open call for researchers willing to share their stories of wellbeing in academic life in a podcast or blog. For more information, please download a pdf version of the call and feel free to share information about this call and the ReMO project within your networks. The podcast series is being developed by Federica Bressan and our blog is being launched by Anupoma Haque. https://projects.tib.eu/fileadmin/data/remo/docs/ReMOPodcastCall.pdf
- Short-Term Scientific Missions are open for application at https://e-services.cost.eu/stsm Check the ReMO website for further information: https://projects.tib.eu/remo/activities/short-term-scientific-missions/
 
Brian Cahill
added an update
ReMO is collecting stories for a new podcast and a blog. If you would like to contribute, please read the following paragraph. Are you an academic who has experienced a hard time in your work and personal life? Have you struggled with sleep deprivation, lack of motivation, anxiety or any broad symptom related to your personal and mental well-being? We are looking for individuals, at any stage of their career, any gender, research area, to share their story. We understand that talking about issues like these may be uncomfortable for you, so we will respect your right to remain anonymous, if you wish. Sounds like you? To share your story, please fill in this form. You will be asked general information, no details needed. You may be contacted for a follow-up informal chat with our production team. Link to form:
The deadline for submissions is Sept. 25th.
However, we will start reviewing stories as soon as they come. So, don't wait! Should you have questions or doubts, please reach out at: remo.cost.action@gmail.com (or podcast@federicabressan.com)
 
Brian Cahill
added an update
The ReMO COST Action has opened a page on Facebook. You can now follow ReMO at https://www.facebook.com/Researcher-Mental-Health-Observatory-COST-Action-103891998700876
 
Brian Cahill
added an update
EARLI 2021 Conference, Thursday 26th August, 15:45 – 16:45 CET
Type of Session: Panel Discussion
Chair: Brian Cahill
Speakers:
  • Janet Metcalfe of Vitae
  • Inge van der Weijden of Center for Science and Technology Studies of Leiden University
  • Gábor Kismihók of Learning and Skills Analytics Group of Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology University Library
  • Alexander Hasgall of European Universities Association Council on Doctoral Education
Abstract:
This session will discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected early-career researchers and what lessons can be learned for doctoral education and training with a special focus on doctoral programmes in educational research related areas. Since the introduction of lockdowns throughout Europe during March 2020, many researchers have been forced to modify, restrict or reduce their research activity. Home working may suit some researchers but research work often depends on access to laboratories, research infrastructure, field work and archives. For those with parental responsibilities, the lockdown was accompanied by a closure of schools and childcare that reduced the time available to work from home. International researchers have experienced greater isolation. In particular, we will highlight issues related to the mental wellbeing of PhD candidates and discuss survey data showing how the crisis has exacerbated mental health issues among early-career researchers. This session will present and discuss strategies and practices from and for doctoral programs, including shifting PhD supervision, evaluation and promotions online, provision of online doctoral training, improving digital communication in doctoral supervision, securing doctoral funding extensions and handling restrictions in international mobility.
Extended Summary:
The COVID pandemic has had a huge impact on our societies and universities since March 2020. Doctoral candidates are the most junior level of academic researchers and have been more exposed to insecurity during the pandemic.
This session will depart from the currently available evidence of pitfalls in doctoral education and assessing the prevalence of mental health issues among early-career researchers before the pandemic. Often those most affected are those, who experience inequality, such as, younger researchers, female researchers, international researchers and those with caring responsibilities. The session will discuss the evidence of the prevalence of mental health issues among doctoral candidates, how COVID-19 exacerbated such mental health issues and discuss the effectiveness of interventions.
There will be a discussion of how existing EARLI research sheds light on a particular theme, or by considering new lines of research that need to be pursued.
During the session we will cover 4 important viewpoints:
1. Pre-Pandemic Assessment of Researcher Wellbeing. The emergence of lower levels of mental health among researchers predates the COVID pandemic. Inge van der Weijden is a leading researcher on the motivation, selection and evaluation of researchers in order to better understand their career development and to provide insight to policymakers and institutional stakeholders on higher education policy. She co-authored the report, The Mental Well-Being of Leiden University PhD Candidates, that proposed concrete measures for institutions to support the mental health of early-career researchers by:
  • appointing independent psychologist for PhD candidates,
  • establishing a supervision team for international PhD candidates,
  • providing career coaching for both non-academic and academic careers,
  • providing supervisor training for both new and experienced supervisors,
  • providing transparency with regard to the requirements PhD candidates must meet,
  • supporting independent PhD mentoring groups,
  • frequently monitoring of the well-being of PhD candidates and
  • evaluating chosen interventions.
2. Impact of COVID-19 Crisis on Researcher Wellbeing. We will examine the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the research work, mental wellbeing and social connection of early-career researchers and research staff as evidenced by Janet Metcalfe’s work as part of the SMARTEN/VITAE survey. This survey examined changes to employment outside of academia, living arrangements, caring arrangements and support by supervisors and by universities. The survey found that inequalities in research were a clear predictor of being more impacted by the COVID pandemic with females, caregivers, researchers with a physical disability or long-term illness and international researchers being more likely to be struggling with their mental wellbeing.
3. Digitization of the research environment. Although conferences, physical training courses and university lectures have been greatly restricted, there has been a strong increase in the uptake of digital transferable skills training during the last 12 months. Personalization of researcher training is not a novel discussion, however, the current COVID situation put this issue - together with the digitization of research environments - into the spotlight as well. Gábor Kismihók will contribute to the discussion from the point of view of learning and skills analytics, and showcase how to support early-career researchers in improving their career perspectives by assessing their skills gaps and recommending personalized training opportunities.
4. Institutional Adoption. Doctoral Programmes have adapted their programmes to meet the demands of COVID and the EUA Council of Doctoral Education has played a strong role supporting universities to make changes that will support the mental wellbeing of doctoral candidates. In particular, the EUA-CDE worked with European doctoral programmes in providing guidance and examples of good practice in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with regard to:
  • Online assessment and doctoral dissertation defence
  • Online skills training and supervision
  • Supporting doctoral candidates' mental health and well-being
  • The effect of the pandemic on collaborations and funding of doctoral education
In the aftermath of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental wellbeing of doctoral candidates, this session suggests actions and practices that institutions can take not just to respond to this crisis but to improve the outcomes of doctoral education in general
 
Brian Cahill
added an update
The ReMO YouTube channel currently features 8 videos from ReMO online events: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk2Bbj2eVm-AixJHOU_8jqQ/
 
Brian Cahill
added an update
Brian Cahill
added an update
Fill in this survey, so we can send you our announcements and so Working Group leaders are aware of your profile: https://forms.gle/u2LCdXcKeVocp8cG8
 
Brian Cahill
added a research item
The ongoing ‘refugee crisis’ of the past years has led to the migration of refugee researchers (RRs) to European countries. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, RRs often had to work from home and/or to continue their social, cultural and economic integration process under new conditions. An online survey carried out to explore the impact of the pandemic on the refugee researchers showed that RRs found it difficult to adapt their everyday working life to the ‘home’ setting. The majority have had neither a suitable work environment at home nor the appropriate technology. Although they stated that they are rather pleased with the measures taken by the public authorities, they expressed concern about their vulnerability due to their precarious contracts and the bureaucratic asylum procedures, as the pandemic has had a negative impact on these major issues. The majority of RRs working in academia seem not to have been affected at all as far as their income is concerned, while the majority of those employed in other sectors became unemployed during the pandemic (58%). Recommendations are provided to the public authorities and policy makers to assist RRs to mitigate the consequences of the pandemic on their life.
Brian Cahill
added an update
More details about the ReMO COST action are available at http://www.remo-network.eu/
 
Brian Cahill
added an update
Article on Researcher Mental Health in Nature features interviews with Katia Levecque and Gábor Kismihók: Nature 595, 135-137 (2021)
 
Brian Cahill
added a project goal
The ReMO COST Action focuses on wellbeing and mental health within academia, a theme of strategic importance for the European Research Area. Previous research shows that low levels of wellbeing and mental health problems have a negative impact on individual, team and organizational performance, triggering significant costs. In addition, institutional context, organizational structure and culture, as well as managerial practices have significant impact on wellbeing and health of employees. Therefore, general insights on the causes of workplace wellbeing and mental health need to be refined with contextual specifics (i.e. in academia) in order to develop tailored, effective and efficient prevention and action programs.