Project

Research Group Maria Rauschenberger

Goal: How to solve social issues with computer science techniques

Together with my colleagues, we have a bigger picture which is presented in our Reserach Group on: https://www.researchgate.net/lab/Research-Group-for-Agile-Software-Development-and-User-Experience-Joerg-Thomaschewski

Here we have current Rearch from my active members: Andreas M. Klein, Kristina Kölln and Anna Weigand.

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Project log

Kristina Kölln
added a research item
Gamification is widely known and implemented for various purposes. But it is also criticized for recurring lack of quality. Many researchers developed gamification frameworks and tools to ensure a purposeful gamification, but these theoretical frameworks are used by less than half of gamification research. There are numerous gamification frameworks and it is difficult to find a specific one. Our research aims to tackle this problem by providing a fast and easy process, that allows finding a gamification framework for a specific use case. We want to achieve this, by identifying selection and quality criteria and developing a method to match these criteria to a gamification framework. Succeeding this we will develop a tool, that allows the user to identify the most suited gamification frameworks for any combination of the selection criteria.
Maria Rauschenberger
added 7 research items
This is the user data that was collected with the game MusVis as well as analyzed and published in different publications. We designed the game content taking into consideration the analysis of mistakes of people with dyslexia in different languages and other parameters related to dyslexia like auditory perception as well as visual perception. We collected with the online experiment in total 313 participants. We separated our data into three data sets: one for the Spanish participants (ES, n = 153), a second for the German participants (DE, n = 149), and one for all languages (ALL, n = 313) in which we included participants that spoke English (n = 11). Participants ranged in age from 7 to 12 years old.
Children with dyslexia have difficulties learning how to read and write. They are often diagnosed after they fail school even if dyslexia is not related to general intelligence. Early screening of dyslexia can prevent the negative side effects of late detection and enables early intervention. In this context, we present an approach for universal screening of dyslexia using machine learning models with data gathered from a web-based language-independent game. We designed the game content taking into consideration the analysis of mistakes of people with dyslexia in different languages and other parameters related to dyslexia like auditory perception as well as visual perception. We did a user study with 313 children (116 with dyslexia) and train predictive machine learning models with the collected data. Our method yields an accuracy of 0.74 for German and 0.69 for Spanish as well as a F1-score of 0.75 for German and 0.75 for Spanish, using Random Forests and Extra Trees, respectively. We also present the collected user data, game content design, potential new auditory input, and knowledge about the design approach for future research to explore universal screening of dyslexia. Universal screening with language-independent content can be used for the screening of pre-readers who do not have any language skills, facilitating a potential early intervention.
Voice User Interfaces (VUIs) are becoming increasingly available while users raise, e.g., concerns about privacy issues. User Experience (UX) helps in the design and evaluation of VUIs with focus on the user. Knowledge of the relevant UX aspects for VUIs is needed to understand the user’s point of view when developing such systems. Known UX aspects are derived, e.g., from graphical user interfaces or expert-driven research. The user’s opinion on UX aspects for VUIs, however, has thus far been missing. Hence, we conducted a qualitative and quantitative user study to determine which aspects users take into account when evaluating VUIs. We generated a list of 32 UX aspects that intensive users consider for VUIs. These overlap with, but are not limited to, aspects from established literature. For example, while Efficiency and Effectivity are already well known, Simplicity and Politeness are inherent to known VUI UX aspects but are not necessarily focused. Furthermore, Independency and Context-sensitivity are some new UX aspects for VUIs.
Maria Rauschenberger
added 6 research items
When discussing interpretable machine learning results, researchers need to compare results and reflect on reliable results, especially for health-related data. The reason is the negative impact of wrong results on a person, such as in missing early screening of dyslexia or wrong prediction of cancer. We present nine criteria that help avoiding over-fitting and biased interpretation of results when having small imbalanced data related to health. We present a use case of early screening of dyslexia with an imbalanced data set using machine learning classification to explain design decisions and discuss issues for further research.
Maria Rauschenberger
added 10 research items
Protocol for Comparing Voice Assistant Risks and Potential with Technology-Based Users: A Study from Germany and Spain. Version 3.0 / 2021.
Research in progress: The Gamification Codebook contains a catalogue of Gamification components, which are modulized within Gamification themes. In addition it contains criteria to apply these components in practice in a user-centered way. The Gamification Codebook can be used in three ways: As an analysis tool to identify the Gamification character within digital products. As a design tool to create customized Gamification concepts and integrate them practically within digital products. As a quality assurance tool during the Gamification design to ensure a user-centered approach. The current state is research in progress. Feel invited to reach out to the author for advice on usage.
The dynamically growing research area of gamification is loaded with a lack of consensus on definitions, a variety of non-validated frameworks, and few practical insights. Hence, we conducted a literature review to explore current best practices in applying gamification for integration in a practical use case. Instead, we found a narrow focus on theoretical discussions. For a stronger representation of practical research, standards need to be established for transferring gamification concepts to practical application. To fill this research gap, we designed a process and tools for a practical, human-centered, and context-related gamification application. We derived the process and tools from insights of our literature review as well as the realization of a gamification use case on a German online comparison platform. In addition, we incorporated standards such as the Human-Centered Design Process to maintain the established quality level of the field of user experience. In this paper, we present the Human-Centered Gamification Process (HCGP) and provide tools as practical guidance to lower the barrier for researchers and professionals to conduct theoretical and practical gamification projects.
Maria Rauschenberger
added a project goal
How to solve social issues with computer science techniques
Together with my colleagues, we have a bigger picture which is presented in our Reserach Group on: https://www.researchgate.net/lab/Research-Group-for-Agile-Software-Development-and-User-Experience-Joerg-Thomaschewski
Here we have current Rearch from my active members: Andreas M. Klein, Kristina Kölln and Anna Weigand.