Archived project

Raising Awareness, Raising Aspiration

Goal: RARA is a project funded by the HEFCE Catalyst Fund, dedicated to improving personal tutoring as a means for narrowing gaps in student achievement.

We represent a diverse coalition of universities committed to closing our attainment gaps, specifically for students from BME groups, and lower socio-economic backgrounds.

Through this project we are going to draw on existing best practice, pilot a targeted approach to personal tutoring, in a diverse range of faculties: Engineering (Sheffield), Dentistry (King’s), and Creative and Cultural Industries (Portsmouth).

We know the difference effective personal tutoring might make to students’ personal and education outcomes: the project hopes to capture this learning so universities can make evidence-informed decisions about personal tutoring.

What are we going to do

Learning from the pilots we engage with we will share our experience and knowledge with the sector through:

1) An evidence-based best practice toolkit and CPD package to tackle closing the attainment gap, which can be rolled out nationally to support PT (personal tutoring), aligned to national HE CPD frameworks.

2) A National Best Practice Support Menu, which will provide ‘courses’ of reflection drawn from the three diverse institutions and subject areas, enabling scalability, and empowering staff to ‘test’ varied approaches. Each ‘course’ on the menu will tackle a ‘wicked issue’ connected to deploying personal tutoring frameworks that work to reach all students.

3) Added-value research, evaluation into attainment gaps and personal tutoring. With a big data set being generated, and a team of leading and talented HE researchers supporting the project, the opportunities for sharing additional research and insight with the sector are numerous!

More information can be found at: www.raratutor.ac.uk

Date: 1 March 2017 - 31 March 2019

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
0
Reads
0 new
27

Project log

Samuel Dent
added 4 research items
This paper considers the experience of students groups known to have unexplained attainment gaps in the context of personal tutoring. We seek to understand from the student’s perspective the specific nature of these roles and relationships. Considering the ways in which these roles can and do impact the factors which contribute to gaps in attainment. We explore the ways in which students from BME and lower socio economic backgrounds, experience one-to-one pedagogical relationships. We suggest that these students reflections highlight the way in which one-to-one pedagogical relationships can be vital to support students to divine, and realise their potential. We suggest that these relationships carry complex messages of institutionalised values, which when recognised can have the potential to make significant progress to tacking social inequalities in HE, such as reducing gaps in attainment. (less)
Attainment gaps for some students, such as those from BME or lower socio-economic backgrounds have been acknowledged in UK higher education for quite some time (Brocke & Nichols, 2006; ECU, 2016). As these gaps exist despite controlling for prior attainment, we know they emerge once students enter HE. Existing research highlights how these gaps can be the influenced by a lack of ‘mattering’ and ‘belonging’, leading to a sense of ‘othering’ which can impact on students’ sense of entitlement to support. Such research recommends acknowledging the importance of power sharing betweenstaff and students (Stevenson, 2012), and the way staff can act as ‘agents of change’ in reducing these attainment gaps (Mountford-Zimdars et al, 2015). Building on these recommendations, this paper explores factors which may contribute to attainment gaps in the context of personal tutoring. This paper presents interim findings from students’ reflections on personal tutoring and we suggest that their experiences highlight the way in which one-to-one pedagogical relationships can be vital to support students to realise their potential. We also suggest that these relationships carry complex messages of institutionalised values, which may contribute to tackling social inequalities in HE, such as reducing gaps in attainment.
Unexplained attainment gaps exist for BME students, 17.7% nationally controlling for prior attainment (ECU, 2017). Existing research suggests this is contributed to by a number of factors which staff can be change agents for (Mountford-Zimdars et al, 2015) build relationships of power-sharing with students (Stevenson, 2012). I present the initial findings of a HEFCE-funded-project, which applies these findings to developing an approach to personal tutoring in three disciplines and institutions to support the closure of attainment gaps. This paper presents interim findings from the ‘before’ phase of project, drawing on a series of surveys and focus groups with students and staff from the project. Mobilising Frasers (2001) theories of recognition, I deconstruct the ways in which students and staff conceptualise personal tutoring exploring its potential to perpetuate/remedy social-inequalities. I argue that reconceptualising existing working practices, with a robust theoretical framework to support the ‘participatory parity’ of different groups of students.
Samuel Dent
added a research item
Official launch presentation of the RARA project.
Samuel Dent
added a project goal
RARA is a project funded by the HEFCE Catalyst Fund, dedicated to improving personal tutoring as a means for narrowing gaps in student achievement.
We represent a diverse coalition of universities committed to closing our attainment gaps, specifically for students from BME groups, and lower socio-economic backgrounds.
Through this project we are going to draw on existing best practice, pilot a targeted approach to personal tutoring, in a diverse range of faculties: Engineering (Sheffield), Dentistry (King’s), and Creative and Cultural Industries (Portsmouth).
We know the difference effective personal tutoring might make to students’ personal and education outcomes: the project hopes to capture this learning so universities can make evidence-informed decisions about personal tutoring.
What are we going to do
Learning from the pilots we engage with we will share our experience and knowledge with the sector through:
1) An evidence-based best practice toolkit and CPD package to tackle closing the attainment gap, which can be rolled out nationally to support PT (personal tutoring), aligned to national HE CPD frameworks.
2) A National Best Practice Support Menu, which will provide ‘courses’ of reflection drawn from the three diverse institutions and subject areas, enabling scalability, and empowering staff to ‘test’ varied approaches. Each ‘course’ on the menu will tackle a ‘wicked issue’ connected to deploying personal tutoring frameworks that work to reach all students.
3) Added-value research, evaluation into attainment gaps and personal tutoring. With a big data set being generated, and a team of leading and talented HE researchers supporting the project, the opportunities for sharing additional research and insight with the sector are numerous!
More information can be found at: www.raratutor.ac.uk
 
Samuel Dent
added a research item