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Psychological test adaptation

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Petru Constantinescu
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In this applied research study, we demonstrate the capacity of stressful life events as well as coping styles and strategies to predict emotional well-being and ill-being. We conducted a two-step hierarchical regression analyses, involving an objective component of lived experience (stressful events) and a subjective component of coping responses. The results showed not only that Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS) scores could alone predict emotional well-being, but that when stressful events as captured by the SRRS and coping styles and strategies as measured by the COPE are combined, the prediction of emotional well-being and ill-being provide a useful model for clinicians to use in assessing, conceptualizing, and designing interventions to improve the capacity of clients to successfully manage the emotional outcomes of stress.
Petru Constantinescu
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THE FACTORIAL STRUCTURE OF THE ROMANIAN CENTER OF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES DEPRESSION SCALE: A SINGLE MEASUREMENT OF WELL-BEING AND DEPRESSION ON A CONTINUUM Petru Mădălin Constantinescu 1 , Cristina (Neacsa) Glonț 2 , Michael Stevens 3 1 University of Hagen, Germany, petru-madalin.constantinescu@studium.fernuni-hagen.de 2 Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania, contact@cabinetpsihologie.net 3 The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania, michaelstevens@thechicagoschool.edu Abstract: Since the creation of the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the international popularization of the questionnaire, its factor structure has been the focus of much research. Different factorial structures in studies have been proposed, and much of the research has agreed that CES-D is not unifactorial, thus not measuring the single construct of depression. However, new directions proposed by Positive Clinical Psychology that involve an alternative theoretical conceptualization and advanced Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) techniques have discovered that the CES-D actually measures a bipolar emotional continuum, ranging between emotional well-being and depression. The scale is proving to be unifactorial. This new research direction has not yet been applied tot he Romanian version of the CES-D. Using sophistoicated CFA procedures, we were able to replicate other recent international findings in a Romanian sample. We situate our results within the Positive Clinical Psychology framework and describe ways of using the Romanian version of the CES-D as an index of emotional well-being and emotional ill health. The instrument could be actually used in research and in clinical practice. Keywords: Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), factorial structure,
Petru Constantinescu
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The Penn State Worry Questionnaire(PSWQ) is an important instrument for the assessment of worry symptoms, which was translated and adapted in many countries around the world. We sought to translate and adapt the PSWQ in Romania for clinical and nonclinical purposes. For that purpose, we conducted two studies. In the first study, we translated and back-translated the PSWQ and tested the translation on 35 bilingual participants. Additionally, we assessed the temporal stability of the instrument along with its internal consistency. Results indicated a good translation and adequate initial psychometric properties of the instrument. In the second study, in a more heterogeneous sample of 116 participants, we assessed the factorial validity of the Romanian PSWQ by fitting three competing Confirmatory Analysis Models, according to prior research on PSWQ, using new developed corrections to traditional CFA in low samples and that allow taking into account the correlated errors due to method effects. We then analyzed again the internal consistency of the instrument and assessed its convergent validity with validated anxiety, depression, and well-being measures. Results indicated that the instrument has excellent reliability, is unidimensional and has adequate convergent validity, being significantly related to anxiety and depression measures as well as to satisfaction with life. The potential clinical and nonclinical uses of the Romanian PSWQ are highlighted and the results are situated in the main research trend concerning the instrument, recent development of “positive clinical psychology” and cross-culturally, with respect to the particular Romanian socio-cultural context.
Petru Constantinescu
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Abstract: The Penn State Worry Questionnaire(PSWQ) is an important instrument for the assessment of worry symptoms, which was translated and adapted in many countries around the world. We sought to translate and adapt the PSWQ in Romania for clinical and nonclinical purposes. For that purpose, we conducted two studies. In the first study, we translated and back-translated the PSWQ and tested the translation on 35 bilingual participants. Additionally, we assessed the temporal stability of the instrument along with its internal consistency. Results indicated a good translation and adequate initial psychometric properties of the instrument. In the second study, in a more heterogeneous sample of 116 participants, we assessed the factorial validity of the Romanian PSWQ by fitting three competing Confirmatory Analysis Models, according to prior research on PSWQ, using new developed corrections to traditional CFA in low samples and that allow taking into account the correlated errors due to method effects. We then analyzed again the internal consistency of the instrument and assessed its convergent validity with validated anxiety, depression, and well-being measures. Results indicated that the instrument has excellent reliability, is unidimensional and has adequate convergent validity, being significantly related to anxiety and depression measures as well as to satisfaction with life. The potential clinical and nonclinical uses of the Romanian PSWQ are highlighted and the results are situated in the main research trend concerning the instrument, recent development of “positive clinical psychology” and cross-culturally, with respect to the particular Romanian socio-cultural context.
Key-words: The Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Worry, bilingual test-retest method, corrected CFA,
validity, reliability
@Michael J. Srevens @Iris Dahl
 
Petru Constantinescu
added an update
The Romanian PSWQ: instrument validation and cross-cultural specifity
The main purpose of the present studies are the validation of the original Penn State Worry Questionnaire in Romania using scientifically sound methodology as well as establish psychometric properties and situate the findings in the cross-cultural area concerning PSWQ research.
 
Petru Constantinescu
added 6 research items
Besides the proprietary questionnaires that asses the five traits of the Big Five Model, that are world wide available, there is also an international scientific collaborative public domain project that developed IPIP-50 questionnaire that measures the five traits of the model. IPIP-50 has been translated and validated in Romania. The study had some methodological limitations but the instrument appeared psychometrically sound. Thus, we conducted two studies for the improvement of the Romanian IPIP-50, in which the translation has tested, psychometric properties of Romanian IPIP-50 were further tested and we replicated to a large degree some of the findings of the previous study of Romanian IPIP-50 adaptation.
After developing Consciousness Quotient Inventory - CQI (Brazdau, 2009), research showed the need for improvement. The purpose of the current studies was to adapt and improve the CQI by revealing how demographically heterogeneous participant group (N=12) cognitively evaluate the life situations described by the CQI items. The CQI was revised two times in the light of the newest literature on conscious experience (Study #1) and using Willis’ cognitive interviewing methodology (1999), by conducting individual Cognitive interviews and further improved the CQI (Study #2). As a result, the format and the content of all 62 the items have been improved significantly.