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Nancy Snow
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"The Edward Bernays Reader: From Propaganda to the Engineering of Consent," is the first comprehensive volume of the writings of this influential and controversial figure. In addition to featuring extended excerpts from "Crystallizing Public Opinion" and "Propaganda," this book also includes the full text of Bernays’ classic 1947 essay, “The Engineering of Consent,” on the application of scientific principles and practices to the task of getting people to support ideas and programs, as well as extensive selections of his other writings on subjects including education, war propaganda, and polling. Taken together, the material in this book offers the most complete look to date at the work of a man whose ideas are considered the single most important influence on modern propaganda, public relations, and spin. Featuring an introduction by Nancy Snow.
Nancy Snow
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The SAGE Handbook of Propaganda unpacks the ever-present and exciting topic of propaganda to explain how it invades the human psyche, in what ways it does so, and in what contexts. As a beguiling tool of political persuasion in times of war, peace, and uncertainty, propaganda incites people to take, often violent, action, consciously or unconsciously. This pervasive influence is particularly prevalent in world politics and international relations today. In this interdisciplinary Handbook, the editors have gathered together a group of world-class scholars from Europe, America, Asia, and the Middle East, to discuss leadership propaganda, war propaganda, propaganda for peace marketing, propaganda as a psychological tool, terror-enhanced propaganda, and the contemporary topics of internet-mediated propaganda. Unlike previous publications on the subject, this book brings to the forefront current manifestations and processes of propaganda such as Islamist, and Far Right propaganda, from interdisciplinary perspectives. In its four parts, the Handbook offers researchers and academics of propaganda studies, peace and conflict studies, media and communication studies, political science and governance marketing, as well as intelligence and law enforcement communities, a comprehensive overview of the tools and context of the development and evolution of propaganda from the twentieth century to the present: Part One: Concepts, Precepts and Techniques in Propaganda Research Part Two: Methodological Approaches in Propaganda Research Part Three: Tools and Techniques in Counter-Propaganda Research Part Four: Propaganda in Context
Nancy Snow
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Propaganda is sponsored information that uses cause‐ and emotion‐laden content to sway public opinion and behavior in support of the source's goals. Propaganda utilizes mass media to cultivate a propaganda mind, that is, the individual in relationship to the masses, such as society or large groups. The majority view of propaganda today is neutralist: it is generally accepted that propaganda is here to stay and the need now is to figure out how to delineate the good from the bad. In the twenty‐first century, the rise of fake news and disinformation campaigns have expanded the continuum of what constitutes the darker forms of propaganda. On its face, the ethics and standards of respectable journalism eschews propaganda goals altogether, but increasingly treads into its path through the rising waters of credibility, narrativity, opinion shaping, entertainment, and storytelling that have increasingly replaced the higher standard of objective, facts‐centric truth. To various degrees, the influencers and respectable journalists are immersed in propaganda channels, much more so than the general population, which has neither the means nor interest in distinguishing information from propaganda. The propaganda that we so often disdain is here to stay.
Nancy Snow
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Book Review of Propaganda and American Democracy edited by Nancy Snow James J. Kimble
Journal of Communication Inquiry Vol 39, Issue 2, pp. 187 - 189
First Published April 30, 2015
 
Nancy Snow
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The most effective propaganda is simple, direct and repetitive. The reporter-turned-captive narrative does not require some lengthy textbook to explain: the captive makes a statement of his last will and testament that directly ties the accompanying violent act to his indictment. The US and UK military-media-industrial complex is made to look impotent in its response. The propagandists come across as a credible threat to a secular, pluralistic way of life that far too many of us, apparently, take for granted.
Nancy Snow
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Propaganda has become an inescapable part of modern American society. On a daily basis, news outlets, politicians, and the entertainment industry -- with motives both dubious and well-intentioned - launch propagandistic appeals. In Propaganda and American Democracy, eight writers explore various aspects of modern propaganda and its impact. Contributors include leading scholars in the field of propaganda studies: Anthony Pratkanis tackles the thorny issue of the inherent morality of propaganda; J. Michael Sproule explores the extent to which propaganda permeates the U.S. news media; and Randal Marlin charts the methods used to identify, research, and reform the use of propaganda in the public sphere. Other chapters incorporate a strong historical component. Mordecai Lee deftly analyzes the role of wartime propaganda, while Dan Kuehl provides an astute commentary on former and current practices, and Garth S. Jowett investigates how Hollywood has been used as a vehicle for propaganda. In a more personal vein, Asra Q. Nomani recounts her journalistic role in the highly calculated and tragic example of the ultimate act of anti-American propaganda perpetrated by al-Qaeda and carried out against her former colleague, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. Propaganda and American Democracy offers an in-depth examination and demonstration of the pervasiveness of propaganda, providing citizens with the knowledge needed to mediate its effect on their lives.Edited by Nancy Snow. © 2014 by Louisiana State University Press. All rights reserved.
Nancy Snow
added 7 research items
In the hands of motion picture makers lies a gigantic obligation, honorable but frightening. We must have the courage and the wisdom to make pictures that are forthright, revealing and entertaining, pertinent to the hour and the unpredictable future. 2 —Harry Warner The motion picture industry could be the most powerful instrument of propaganda in the world, whether it tries to be or not. 3 —Franklin D. Roosevelt Harry Warner was Roosevelt's man in Hollywood. He was not the bold, brash, bombastic and ever-tan brother Jack Warner, the public face of Warner Bros., who made up a story about being offered a diplomatic post after Roosevelt's victory in 1932, to which he replied, " I think I can do better for your foreign relations with a good picture about America now and then. " 4 More than Jack, Harry displayed a genuine passion and commitment to lofty ideas that promoted America's national security and vital interests. The moral conscience of Warner Bros., Harry became President Franklin D. Roosevelt's chief persuader in Hollywood, a valiant and courageous advocate for U.S. involvement against the rise of national socialism bellicosity abroad at a time when many in the United States remained isolationist. 5