Project

Product Counterfeiting and Illicit Markets

Goal: This research explores the nature of and response to product counterfeiting and illicit markets.

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Jeremy M. Wilson
added 21 research items
Considering the steady and rapid growth of product counterfeiting and the damage it causes to society, it is important for criminology and criminal justice scholars to assist criminal justice officials, industry practitioners, and law makers in understanding the product counterfeiting problem and developing strategies to combat it. However, for researchers to be effective in their advisory role they must first establish what is known about product counterfeiting. As a first step in this process, we investigated relevant published research through a content analysis of 47 articles discussing product counterfeiting published in criminal justice and criminology journals through 2014. We analyzed various characteristics about the articles themselves, their authors, the journals they appeared in, and the nature and extent of their focus on product counterfeiting. We conclude this study with an evaluation of the state of product counterfeiting research and recommendations for future research.
The growing pace of e-commerce has facilitated the sale and distribution of counterfeit products. One reason may be that consumers cannot fully validate goods for sale online, thus creating tremendous opportunities for fraud. Despite the growth of online product counterfeiting specifically, little research has examined this crime which limits our basic understanding of the problem and victim reporting. Drawing on 2009 and 2010 complainant data from the Internet Crime Complaint Center, we examine the characteristics, costs, and reporting of online auction and non-auction product counterfeiting incidents. In light of the limitations of this study, we discuss the contribution of our findings for advancing theory and future research.
Due to its considerable negative consequences, product counterfeiting is a global problem that is a growing concern for consumers, government entities, law enforcement, and businesses. Unfortunately, current assessments of the nature and extent of the problem are largely unreliable and based on methodologies with significant limitations. This article examines the current approaches to measuring product counterfeiting, complementing those with a review of methods used to examine other crimes. It concludes by discussing the applicability of both commonly used and novel research methodologies, as they might apply to the study of product counterfeiting.
Jeremy M. Wilson
added a project goal
This research explores the nature of and response to product counterfeiting and illicit markets.