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PriSciNet

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Project log

Suzanne Gatt
added 3 research items
This document is a compilation of 15 out of 45 IBSE activities which have been developed within the Pri-Sci-Net project for the free use by teachers across Europe. They are designed specifically for primary teachers and can be implemented with children in the age-range of 9-11 years. The activities are designed mainly to provide inspiration for inquiry activities which can be organised for children in normal classrooms and it is not necessary to implement them exactly in the way that they are presented. No special scientific apparatus is required and there is no need to be science specialists to do them. What is important is to promote the inquiry process. This project Pri-Sci-Net has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7 2007 /13) under grant agreement No.266647
This document is a compilation of 15 out of 45 IBSE activities which have been developed within the Pri-Sci-Net project for the free use by teachers across Europe. They are designed specifically for primary teachers and can be implemented with children in the age-range of 6-8 years. The activities are designed mainly to provide inspiration for inquiry activities which can be organised for children in normal classrooms and it is not necessary to implement them exactly in the way that they are presented. No special scientific apparatus is required and there is no need to be science specialists to do them. What is important is to promote the inquiry process. This project Pri-Sci-Net has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7 2007 /13) under grant agreement No.266647
This document is a compilation of 15 (from 45) IBSE activities which have been developed within the Pri-Sci-Net project for the free use by teachers across Europe. They are designed specifically for primary teachers and can be implemented with children in the age-range of 3-5 years. The activities are designed mainly to provide inspiration for inquiry activities which can be organised for children in normal classrooms and it is not necessary to implement them exactly in the way that they are presented. No special scientific apparatus is required and there is no need to be science specialists to do them. What is important is to promote the inquiry process.
Marianna Kalaitsidaki
added a research item
This paper combines 4 presentations making up a symposium. Inquiry-based learning in science has been advocated by the European Commission at both primary and secondary level of education (Rocard et al, 2007) However, changes in science pedagogy across Europe has proved to be a challenge. In addition cultural and linguistic contexts of learning and education systems across Europe vary and make the transfer of educational resources and pedagogical approaches difficult. The Pri-Sci-Net project is an FP7 Coordination and Supporting Action funded by the European Commission which works to promote the Inquiry-Based approach in Science Education (IBSE) with young primary level children across Europe. One approach through which the project is trying to promote inquiry science is through producing educational material (in the form of 45 IBSE activities) which are to be translated in different European languages. Recognising European diversity, some of these activities were then tested for cultural and language adaptation in the partner countries. This paper provides the research results of an evaluation exercise carried out by some of the partners. The results provide insights into the barriers which students and teachers face in implementing the new inquiry-based approach. The evaluation exercise showed that while there were few cultural and linguistice differences, the main difficulties encountered related more to general education issues such as: teachers' inexperience and lack of confidence in implementing the inquiry-based learning approach; the children's expectations of how learning in science should be; the structured aspect of some curricula which allowed little space for inquiry activities; and teachers' and students' uneasiness in getting used to a new mode of learning. All these aspects highlight the need for time to allow systems, teachers and students to adapt to the inquiry-based learning approach. Curricular and pedagogical changes thus need to be introduced slowly such that adjustment takes place gradually. In addition, during this process, schools and teachers need to have continuous professional support.
Marianna Kalaitsidaki
added a research item
This paper combines 4 presentations making up a symposium. Inquiry-based learning in science has been advocated by the European Commission at both primary and secondary level of education (Rocard et al, 2007) However, changes in science pedagogy across Europe has proved to be a challenge. In addition cultural and linguistic contexts of learning and education systems across Europe vary and make the transfer of educational resources and pedagogical approaches difficult. The Pri-Sci-Net project is an FP7 Coordination and Supporting Action funded by the European Commission which works to promote the Inquiry-Based approach in Science Education (IBSE) with young primary level children across Europe. One approach through which the project is trying to promote inquiry science is through producing educational material (in the form of 45 IBSE activities) which are to be translated in different European languages. Recognising European diversity, some of these activities were then tested for cultural and language adaptation in the partner countries. This paper provides the research results of an evaluation exercise carried out by some of the partners. The results provide insights into the barriers which students and teachers face in implementing the new inquiry-based approach. The evaluation exercise showed that while there were few cultural and linguistice differences, the main difficulties encountered related more to general education issues such as: teachers’ inexperience and lack of confidence in implementing the inquiry-based learning approach; the children’s expectations of how learning in science should be; the structured aspect of some curricula which allowed little space for inquiry activities; and teachers’ and students’ uneasiness in getting used to a new mode of learning. All these aspects highlight the need for time to allow systems, teachers and students to adapt to the inquiry-based learning approach. Curricular and pedagogical changes thus need to be introduced slowly such that adjustment takes place gradually. In addition, during this process, schools and teachers need to have continuous professional support