Archived project

Physical Activity

Goal: Sit Less, Move More

Date: 1 January 2013

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
17
Reads
0 new
90

Project log

Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
Background The distribution of professional golfing injuries is poorly understood. Objective The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review to describe the epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries in professional golfers. Design A systematic review using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. The databases used were Pubmed, SportDiscus and Embase. The inclusion criteria was published observational research articles relating to the incidence or prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in professional golfers, which were written in the English language and not restricted by age or gender. Setting Professional golf. Main Outcome Measurements Data collected included age, sex, data collection methods, diagnosis, region of injury, side of injury, incidence/prevalence of injury, definition of injury, nature of injury, severity of injury, mechanism of injury, risk factors, length of golfing career, injury management and time to return to sport. Results Of the 1863 studies identified on the initial search, five studies were found to satisfy the inclusion criteria for analysis. The mean age of the golfers in these studies was 34.8 (± 3.6) years. The gender of patients in included studies compromised 72% males and 28% females. Four studies reported that lumbar spine injuries were the most common (range 22–34%). Excluding injuries to the spine (lumbar, thoracic and cervical), the hand/wrist was the next most common region of injury (range 6–37%). The quality of the studies was relatively poor with no study satisfying >50% of the quality assessment tool questions and only one study giving a clear definition of how they defined injury. Conclusions There is a paucity of well-designed epidemiological studies evaluating musculoskeletal injuries affecting professional golfers. Injuries to the spine are the most frequently affected region, followed by the hand/wrist. This study has identified targeted areas of future research that aims to improve the management of injuries among professional golfers.
Imagine your city with more cyclists. What would change? · Less car congestion · Cleaner air · Quieter streets · More green and open space · Healthier people · Safer travel Doesn’t that sound like a vision of the future we all want? We spoke to three people who work and advocate for cycling in our cities about their vision for the future. Published by Shimano eSteps https://shimano-steps.com/e-bikes/europe/en/news/what-would-happen-if-everyone-cycled Chris Oliver - Retired professor of medicine and surgeon “It would be absolutely wonderful to have a city where everyone cycled. More people cycling will have a dramatic effect on city life, health and environmental change. Change will take years and years for many cities, it needs leadership, the political will and a lot of time. In the UK, for example, we are 40-50 years behind the Dutch.” “If you are physically active a day for 30 minutes a day you might live longer - as much as 7 years longer than the average population at the moment. Here the population is less physically active now than it was ten years ago, which is shocking. We have to get more people cycling to reap health benefits.” “More people cycling would have a huge effect on the obesity crisis. If you cycle regularly you can expect to lose up to 10kg in a year. We know if you are a Type 2 diabetic and lose 10kg it could be enough to put you into remission. Gastric bands and gastric bypasses are expensive surgery - it will be an enormous health benefit to individuals and save billions of pounds for health services for people to lose weight through cycling. If you can get Type 2 diabetics back to normal healthy levels it reduces the use of medicine, surgeries and amputations, and improves many other health conditions.” “It can only be good for everyone, not just the cyclist but the rest of the population as well. Pollution levels will drop which will be a great thing for lung health. Mental as well as physical health will improve. You are only one cycle ride away from a good mood! People will arrive happier at work, more energised. But facilities need to be in place - proper shower facilities, bike security.” “The antagonism between cyclists and cars saddens me. With more people cycling there is safety in numbers. It will also mean more road users who understand cycling. It's important to start with children. Children who are safe to walk or cycle to school are more likely to continue to walk or cycle when they are older. It changes attitudes - kids go home and want to cycle more, which encourages their parents too.” “Cycling benefits all of society by creating a healthier environment through less pollution and a safer environment where more people are comfortable walking and cycling. Cycling investment saves a country money by easing the pressure on health services caused by Type 2 diabetes and obesity.”
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Long spells cycling in the saddle can put our nether regions in jeopardy – but most of the risks can be prevented or at least managed. Discusses erectile dysfunction and other perineal issues. Cycling Weekly - 7th April 2022 https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitness/herpes-numbness-erectile-dysfunction-cyclists-bare-all-on-uncomfortable-issues-down-there
Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
Stairs climibing article SMSA Health Matters Mar 2020
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Endorsement in book: Find Time for Exercise How to Challenge Yourself and Enjoy the Benefits of Regular Exercise. Mike Dales. www.findtimeforexercise.com Find Time for Exercise offers an achievable solution – regular exercise – to one of the biggest health issues facing the world today: physical inactivity and its consequent problems, including obesity, reduced life expectancy and a wide range of physical and mental health issues. Part 1 sets the scene by describing the worldwide scale of the problem, then focuses on the benefits of exercise and finding the inspiration to increase your own activity levels. Part 2 shares the author’s own exercise challenge and how he began an unbroken eight-year streak of moving at least 5 kilometres per day – walking, running, cycling, kayaking, canoeing or skiing. Part 3 tells the personal stories of ten brave men and women who took on their own challenges to improve their health and well-being, and make positive changes in their lives. Part 4 of the book looks at a range of other challenges, including The Daily Mile and parkrun, and goes on to discuss the health benefits of active commuting, workplace activity and owning a dog. This builds a motivating case for Part 5, which helps the reader set and achieve their own challenge, with suggestions for how to find time for exercise in their busy lives. The final chapter draws together a list of ten principles aimed at helping the reader to choose and succeed in their own challenge. By making regular exercise an achievable activity, focused on the individual’s own goals, however modest, this book shows how everyone can find time for exercise and reap the benefits. ISBN: 978-1-80046-436-0 https://www.troubador.co.uk/bookshop/self-help/find-time-for-exercise/
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Stress fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges are extremely rare injuries. They occur almost universally in adolescents. Metacarpal stress fractures are typically associated with racquet or grip sports, and phalangeal fractures typically occur in rock climbers. Symptoms can be subtle, but magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals the injury. Treatment is nonoperative, with high levels of return to sport, and minimal morbidity.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Invited Gold Medal lecture. "How not to be a surgeon!" Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire, UK. Closed virtual event. 2021. The pdf file is only pictures. The original presentation has sound and video, the file is too big for ResearchGate, contact me for a DropBox Link.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
The e-bike revolution has built momentum over the past few years, and what was once a rare sight on the roads and cycleways of Europe is now becoming more and more common as e-bike attitudes and awareness shifts. A new pan-European report of over 13,000 people from 11 countries for SHIMANO shows an impressive headline; a quarter of Europeans (24%) already own an e-bike or are likely to buy or use an e-bike more this year than last year. This statistic comes from the SHIMANO STEPS E-bike Index 2020 which aims to compare attitudes towards e-bikes across major European countries and explore people’s motivations or hesitations towards using e-bikes for commuting, leisure and transportation. The findings show many fascinating figures. For example: the UK has the smallest amount of people saying they will try an e-bike (7%), whilst almost one in three (30%) in Italy said they would buy or use an e-bike this year. In some countries like Denmark, Switzerland and the UK, there are promising signs amongst the younger generation as 18-24-year-olds have said they are more likely to use one than any other age groups. As to why there is a shift towards e-bikes, the benefits affecting the physical activity and health of individuals is almost universally recognised. The majority (31%) of those who were likely to use or already owned one say they would mainly use an e-bike for leisure or family activities, hinting that an e-bike’s appeal isn’t just limited to commuting (although over a quarter - 28% - would commute on their e-bike). A third (32%) have said they would buy or use an e-bike this year to conquer longer distances or steeper climbs, and many would use one to improve their physical (30%) and mental (22%) health. In some countries, the reasons for using an e-bike differ quite dramatically. In the Netherlands - where a whopping 78% of the population ride a bike at least once a month, the main reason (39%) given by those wanting to ride an e-bike this year was that they would do because it looks like less effort - and with most e-bikes providing up to 25km/h of pedal-assisted motion who can blame them! There is also a nod to environmental reasons for using an e-bike - one in five (18%) adults in the countries surveyed say they are likely to start using an e-bike because they are concerned about the environmental impact of their travel. With young adults (18-24), this rises to over a quarter (26%). Full report https://www.shimano-steps.com/e-bikes/europe/en/state-of-the-nation-report
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Health Benefits of cycling and the way that active travel is affected by the pandemic
Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
Shed on clouds. How Men's Shed St Andrews, Fife, Scotland stayed connected during the coronavirus pandemic using virtual videoconferencing.
Health Benefits of sharing your life with a dog
Chris Oliver
added a research item
The science and fun of making wooden spoons
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Personal story about Prof Chris Oliver and his retirement from surgery. His role as a trustee of the Scottish Men's Shed Association and plans for research of impact and outcomes of the Men's Shed movement.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Studying online requires well-developed self-regulated learning skills to properly manage one’s learning strategies. Learning analytics research has proposed novel methods for extracting theoretically meaningful learning strategies from trace data originating from formal learning settings (online, blended, or flipped classroom). Thus identified strategies proved to be associated with academic achievement. However, automated extraction of theoretically meaningful learning strategies from trace data in the context of massive open online courses (MOOCs) is still under-explored. Moreover, there is a lacuna in research on the relations between automatically detected strategies and the established psychological constructs. The paper reports on a study that (a) applied a state-of-the-art analytic method that combines process and sequence mining techniques to detect learning strategies from the trace data collected in a MOOC (N=1,397), and (b) explored associations of the detected strategies with academic performance and personality traits (Big Five). Four learning strategies detected with the adopted analytics method were shown to be theoretically interpretable as the wellknown approaches to learning. The results also revealed that the four detected learning strategies were predicted by conscientiousness, emotional instability, and agreeableness and were associated with academic performance. Implications for theoretical validity and practical application of analytics-detected learning strategies are also provided.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Why climb the stairs? Stair climbing may seem onerous but the effort and hopefully not discomfort is worthwhile. Regular stair climbing can lower resting heart rates and improve balance. Each trip up and down stairs helps shape and tone different muscles in your legs and lower body. Overall, being able to climb stairs is a good marker of general health.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Lessons learnt from being a cycle campaigner. Prof Chris Oliver's experience of cycle campaigning. Powerpoint has speaker notes included.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Did you know there are guidelines for physical activity? How much activity is enough? What activity should you perform? For how long? Scottish Mens Shed Association - Health Matters Newsletter. 12th November 2019. Edition 10. Page 14. https://scottishmsa.org.uk/ https://scottishmsa.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/ShedderEdition10-Nov2019DIGITAL.pdf
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Invited Opinion Platform piece. Edinburgh Evening News. 30th Sept 2019 https://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/news/opinion/lower-road-speeds-can-help-to-save-more-cyclists-lives-prof-chris-oliver-1-5013190/amp
Chris Oliver
added a research item
King James IV Professorial Lecture. Prof Chris Oliver shares insights into improving data visualisation and knowledge transfer. Publication in Surgeons News. Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. https://www.rcsed.ac.uk/news-public-affairs/surgeons-news/september-2019 pages 28-32
Chris Oliver
added a research item
We know there are many health benefits of sharing your life with a dog.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Published in The Scotsman newspaper as an platform opinion piece 8th May 2019. With the declaration by Nicola Sturgeon of a "climate emergency" we outline why sustainable transport must be understood as critical in any strategy for Scotland to go "further and faster" in tackling climate change. The Scottish Government must achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2045. Net-zero is the point where the same volume of greenhouse gases is being emitted as is being absorbed through offsetting techniques like forestry. Although Scotland has been innovative in carbon reduction, transport remains an Achilles heel. Sustained and strong political leadership in delivering nothing less than transformational change is required. Drawing on robust international evidence a study out this week for Sport England says that town and city-wide active travel interventions are the most effective at increasing walking, cycling and overall physical activity. Taking a UK example from the study, the Sustainable Travel Towns (2004-09 in Peterborough, Darlington and Worcester/Redditch), all three towns put in place a range of initiatives aiming to encourage more use of non-car options-in particular, bus use, cycling and walking-and to discourage single-occupancy car use. Cycle trips per head across the three towns increased by 26-30% and walking between 13-18%. Between 2008-09 and 2013, both the higher cycling and walking levels were maintained. Key to this success was scale and funding: these programmes were funded at a level that enabled significant changes to be made to the physical environment for walking and cycling supported by behaviour change programmes. This created a synergistic effect of the wide range of interventions. Critically, there was a 7-10% reduction in the number of car driver trips per resident. And all for £10Million shared across the three towns-roughly equivalent to a mile of a new road scheme. We are about to see more car free days in our Scottish cities, increased pedestrianisation and businesses being supported to transport goods by cargo bikes. This and much more is needed including low speed streets with safe routes to school for children. Bus lanes, signal priority, park and ride and Workplace Parking Levies in Low Emission Zones, also form part of a synergetic package. So fund what we want to see delivered: although the Active Travel budget was doubled from £40 to 80 million in 2017 this funding needs redoubling in gearing up to achieve the 2045 carbon emission reductions target. The major mode share for sustainable travel across much of continental Europe is not culturally driven. It is because decade in, decade out funding has been at over £10 per head of population.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Throughout my career I have extensively supported surgical informatics and have used various and complex methods of data visualisation to research and improve knowledge transfer and outcomes to patients care. This Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh King James IV professorial lecture outlines my innovative and lifelong contribution to data visualisation, surgery and patient care. Highlights • Many ways to present complex data and simplify it. • Graphs and charts are pictorial and highlight trends. • Choosing correct data visualisation is crucial. • It’s easy with modern software to make data rich visualisations such as infographics. • Data visualisation give a deeper understanding of both simple and complex data. See also PowerPoint with Speaker Notes and References
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Infogram accompanies Tomorrow's doctors want to learn more about physical activity for health
Chris Oliver
added 16 research items
Infographics is an abbreviated term for an information graphic. Information is presented in a logical manner, similar to storytelling, using data visualisations, text and pictures.1 Statistically, the most successful infographics, in terms of number of ‘shares’ on social media, contain an average of 396 words2 and a combination of data visualisations (bar graphs, line graphs and pie charts) and illustrations. Although 396 words may seem like an inadequate amount of text for researchers to convey their findings comprehensively, when considering this in the infographics context, the saying, ‘a picture tells a thousand words’, comes to mind. Three days after learning new information, we are likely to remember up to 6.5 times more through learning from an infographic than by reading text alone.1 Many industries, such as the business, food, …
Chris Oliver
added a project goal
Sit Less, Move More
 
Chris Oliver
added 4 research items
Chris Oliver contributed to the expert opinion forming some of the basis of the opinion. Bicycle Network is calling for a change to Australia’s bicycle helmet laws that would allow adults to decide whether they should wear a helmet when they’re not riding on the road. In all Australian states and territories (excluding Northern Territory), it is currently mandatory for people to wear a helmet whenever and wherever they ride a bike. Bicycle Network is recommending that these laws be relaxed with a five-year trial permitting people older than 17 to choose whether they wear a helmet when riding on footpaths or off-road cycle paths. Bicycle Network has been a supporter of mandatory helmet laws since they were introduced in the 1990s, however after a 14-month policy review has decided to call for change. Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards said that bike riding is languishing in Australia and we need to rethink our helmet policy. “Australia is one of only two countries in the world with fully enforced mandatory helmet law. The number of people who ride a bike isn’t increasing and there has been no decrease in the number of bike rider fatalities. It’s clear that our bike policies aren’t working, so it’s important that we review everything,” Mr Richards said. “Our recommendation is to give people the freedom to choose if they wear a helmet in low risk circumstances, because that’s what bike riding is ultimately all about – freedom.” “60% of bike riders called for change. They don’t believe they need someone to tell them whether to wear a helmet when they’re going down the beach or going for a slow Sunday pedal on a bike path.” While Bicycle Network believes that in low risk, off-road riding environments people should be able to choose whether they wear a helmet, they also believe that Australia’s road networks have not been developed to a stage where they can confidently recommend a full repeal of mandatory helmet laws. “More than 80 per cent of bike rider crashes are caused by someone driving a car, but sadly, we haven’t seen enough done to reduce interaction between bike and cars,” added Mr Richards. “Instead of removing the risks and causes of bicycle crashes, the solution has been helmets which, like all personal protection equipment, is the least effective way to prevent injury and reduce risk.’ Making helmets optional for off-road riding would match legislation in the Northern Territory which is the only place in Australia without a blanket mandatory helmet law. Bicycle Network’s three-part helmet policy review began in August 2017 when nearly 20,000 people completed a survey about Australia’s current helmet laws. Bike riding and medical industry experts were also asked to make submissions and a rapid review of more than 2,500 academic studies was conducted.
Cycling is one of the easiest ways to fit exercise into your daily routine: saves you money, gets you fit and helps the environment. Cycling is not a technically demanding skill to learn and is a low-impact type of exercise. Cycling is easier on your joints than running or other high-impact aerobic activities. But it helps you get into shape. To build your cardiovascular fitness on the bike ride for at least 150 minutes every week and follow the Chief Medical Officers Guidelines for Physical Activity. Cycling is a great way to increase your longevity, as cycling regularly has been associated with increased 'life-years', even when adjusted for risks of injury through cycling. A study of 30,640 people living in Copenhagen showed that people who did not cycle to work were 39% more likely to die during the 15-year study. The health benefits of cycling outweigh the injury risks by between 13:1 and 415:1, according to studies. The figure that is most often quoted-and endorsed by the UK Government-is 20:1 (life years gained due to the benefits of cycling v the life-years lost through injuries). People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy is two years above the average. Cycling must be combined with a healthy diet. Cycling is a comfortable form of exercise and you can change the duration and intensity, it can be built up slowly and varied to suit you. Research suggests you should be burning at least about 2,000 calories a week through exercise. Steady cycling burns about 300 calories per hour. If you cycle twice a day, the calories burnt soon add up. Half-hour bike ride every day will burn nearly five kilograms of fat over a year. Cycling has the added benefit of ramping up your metabolism, even after the ride is over. Mental health conditions such as depression, stress and anxiety can be reduced by regular bike riding. This is due to the effects of the exercise itself producing endorphins and because of the enjoyment that riding a bike can bring. Many researchers have studied the relationship between exercise and cancer, especially colon and breast cancer. Research has shown that if you cycle, the chance of bowel cancer is reduced. Some evidence suggests that regular cycling reduces the risk of breast cancer by inducing the immune system. There is no evidence to suggest prostate cancer is linked to cycling.The rate of type II maturity onset diabetes is dramatically increasing and is a serious public health concern. Lack of physical activity is thought to be a major reason why people develop this condition. Large-scale research in Finland found that people who cycled for more than 30 minutes per day had a 40 per cent lower risk of developing diabetes. Without action, 60% of men, 50% of women and 25% of children will be obese by 2050 in the UK-and cost the NHS £10 billion per annum. Cycling improves strength, balance and coordination. It may also help to prevent falls and fractures. Riding a bike is an ideal form of exercise if you have osteoarthritis, because it is a low-impact exercise that places little stress on joints. Around 70% of body weight goes through the saddle and handlebars instead of through your ankles. The bigger you are, the more important that will be. Cycling does not specifically help osteoporosis (bone-thinning disease) because it is not a weight-bearing exercise.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Physical Activity is recognised as a major global pandemic and a modifiable risk factor in several health outcomes. Evidence suggests that medical students lack knowledge of the physical activity guidelines. Limited curriculum space and available staff expertise in medical faculty. To address this, a flipped classroom was used to encourage the students to be familiar with the physical activity guidelines and to appreciate the role that will have as a doctor to prescribe physical activity.
Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
Active Scotland Outcomes which this abstract contributes to:  We encourage and enable the inactive to be more active  We encourage and enable the active to stay active throughout life  We improve our active infrastructure-people and places  We support well-being and resilience in communities through physical activity and sport This abstract presents a project aimed at increasing tomorrow's doctors' knowledge of the potential for prescribing PA to their patients for both disease prevention and treatment. As such it speaks to a number of the Active Scotland Outcomes by contributing to a philosophy that physical activity is promoted to all throughout both primary and secondary care. Abstract: Background. Despite a growing appetite for providing medical professionals with physical activity (PA) education, there has to date been no dedicated curriculum time for medical students (MBChB) at the University of Edinburgh to be taught about the role of PA in preventing and treating ill health. Progress is hampered by space in the curriculum and available staff expertise in the medical faculty. Through a collaboration between staff and students, we secured internal funding to develop an opportunity for 1st year medical students to explore this topic, and proposed a flipped classroom approach as a single timetabled session within the Health, Ethics and Society module. Aim. To trial a flipped classroom (January 2017) to introduce 1st year medical students to the importance of PA and encourage them to start thinking about the role of the doctor in promoting health enhancing PA behaviour. Method. The pilot flipped classroom consisted of 1) an on-line learning component, which directed the students to pre-learning videos and tasks 2) a one hour faculty led interactive work shop/lecture and 3) going forward resources. Following the workshop, the students were sent a link to provide feedback on the approach and the content. Results. 82 of 206 students enrolled on the module completed the feedback. Of those, 80 students watched the pre-learning videos, of whom 60 students rated the materials either excellent or very good. 97% of the open response comments (n=60) were positive. 71 of the students responded 'yes' or 'somewhat' to the question
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Cycling infrastructure and, in particular, a well maintained pavement surface contributes to a safe and comfortable ride. However, defective pavement surfaces and insufficient maintenance can expose cyclists to excessive hand-arm vibration. Regular exposure to vibration transmitted from work processes is well documented, regulated and controlled in construction and civil engineering industries. Limited data is available regarding commuter and recreational cyclists' exposure to hand-arm vibration. The equipment required to measure and monitor hand-arm vibration is often costly. However, advances in low-cost electronics engineering has provided a range of vibration sensors and recording media. Instrumented probe bicycles can be constructed with low cost apparatus to allow a broad range of data to be collected. For example, recording vibration, geospatial positioning, lighting lux levels and HD video. Applying the procedures adopted for railway and road maintenance to cycle path maintenance is not common practice in Scotland. Measuring cyclist's vibration exposure and examining the health implications of such exposure may provide a medical rationale for improvements to pavement surfaces. A survey of Scottish cyclists vibration exposure symptoms was conducted (n=508). The online questionnaire survey instrument was designed to screen participants for hand-arm vibration symptoms. The results show that a considerable amount of Scottish cyclists who commute or undertake recreational cycling are experiencing symptoms. The results of the questionnaire survey are presented. Furthermore, design and analysis methods for a low-cost hand-arm vibration measurement system are provided. Measurements comply with EN ISO 5339-1:2001 with a sample rate of 5 kHz and the application of frequency weighting filters (W h). Partial and total eight hour equivalent exposure data (A(8) m/s 2 r.m.s.) are provided for a range of cycling infrastructure surfaces in Edinburgh and Glasgow. These preliminary findings demonstrate that there is a potential public health issue associated with active travel and unsuitable pavement surfaces. Results may contribute to the development of pavement engineering design standards for cycling through considering vibration exposure data. https://www.ukhrv2018.uk/
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Update Obesity – Scotland; Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, University of Edinburgh
Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
We, as physical activity researchers, clinicians, transport specialists and advocates, call on you to use your powers as a transport minister to drastically step up your programme of infrastructure and behaviour change. This is to help children travel safely and actively for local journeys within their communities by addressing parental/carer fears for their safety.Such a change requires dedicated funding of at least 10% of the national transport budgets to pay for infrastructure interventions supported by a behaviour change programme. This was first proposed and justified in a report by the Association of Directors of Public Health as long ago as 2008, endorsed by over 100 concerned academic, health, transport and other organisations. Scotland has made a very welcome start with the doubling of funding for active travel from the Scottish Government, announced in 2017. Free full text https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/53/6/334.full?ijkey=AnjEiMhMyoISO8b&keytype=ref
In 1971, a study of children’s travel to and from school focused on five English primary schools. The schools’ locations ranged from inner-urban London to a village primary school (ages 4–11). In 1990, the Policy Studies Institute published a follow-up study with the same schools and added linked secondary schools (ages 11–16). The results were alarming. Independent active travel was declining steeply—on average, a child in 1990 had to be 2.5 years older than in 1971 to be allowed permissions such as to cross local roads and to travel the school journey without an adult. A further study in 2013 reported further significant shrinkage. We are concerned about the effects this will have for Alex and all young people. The school journey.The drivers of children being kept on a leash are multifaceted, but implicated above all is the dominance of the ‘windscreen perspective’—politicians and highway engineers have a driver’s perspective. Free Full text https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/53/6/323.full?ijkey=OTytIjur8Rz28It&keytype=ref
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Physical Activity and wearable tech; Is it reliable?
Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
Healthy Workers, Happy Team: Promoting Positive Lifestyle Change. Teams, Development of teams in healthcare. Belbin. Dependence and intra/interdependence. Tema failure. Role of physical activity in health teams.
Cycling provides a myriad of health benefits; studies have shown that the positive health outcomes outweigh risk by 20:1 and regular cycling drastically reduces the risk of heart disease and cancer. Cycling UK has a full policy briefing on the benefits of cycling for health. Because cycling is good for our health, Cycling UK would like to bring public health professionals together with active travel projects to help enable more people to ride a bike in Scotland. We would like this day to spark conversation and ideas around projects and activities. This could include things like GP referrals, projects for groups of people needing extra support to get physically active, or the breaking down of barriers to building relationships between public health practitioners, patients and cycling projects. This event aims to bring public health practitioners together with active travel professionals and volunteers. The event is for primary care practitioners including GPs and practice nurses, public health professionals, projects and organisations interested in delivering cycling activities and volunteers/staff who would like to join up cycling with health outcomes. The event's chair is Margaret McCartney, a regular contributor for the British Medical Journal and broadcaster for Radio 4’s Inside Health. Keynote speakers include Professor Chris Oliver, Honorary Professor of Physical Activity for Health at the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre (PAHRC), University of Edinburgh; and Dr Katie Walter, GP at Cairn Medical Practice in Inverness. Workshops: How to engage with health professional teams (GPs, nurses) with a presentation from Ferga Penny of Velocity in Inverness and co-facilitator Cameron MacFarlane of ALISS Programme Working with community projects with a presentation from Graham McQueen Forth Environment Link/ Stirling Cycle Hub Embedding Health policy into a cycling project with a talk from Hannah Chivers of Cycling UK on the Cycling 4 Health programme in West Yorkshire. Monitoring health outcomes with a presentation from Emma Razi of Glasgow based community group, Common Wheel Engagement with minority groups with a talk from Lynn Speed of Pedal 4th based at Hawkhill Community Centre in Clackmannanshire Marketing a health cycling project with a presentation from Victoria Leiper of Bike for Good on their Wheelbeing project and co-facilitator Cameron MacFarlane of ALISS Programme Cost. This event is free to attend.
Chris Oliver
added a research item
NHS Scotland Open Innovation Collaboration Programme - Organiser of An Innovation Civic Challenge: Healthy Ageing. The NHS Scotland Open Innovation Collaboration Programme has been set up with funding from Scottish Enterprise, and has organised this Scotland wide event in collaboration with: Heriot Watt University, Napier University, Queen Margaret University, and University of Edinburgh, Interface. City of Edinburgh Council, The Edinburgh Living Lab
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Introduction: Understanding of tram-system related cycling injuries (TSRCI) is poor. The aim of this study was to report the spectrum of injuries, demographics and social deprivation status of patients. Secondary aims included assessment of accident circumstances, effects of TSRCI on patients' confidence cycling, together with time off work and cycling. Methods: A retrospective review of patients presenting to emergency services across all hospitals in Edinburgh and West Lothian with tram related injuries between May 2009 and April 2016 was undertaken. Medical records and imagining were analysed and patients were contacted by telephone. Results: 191 cyclists (119 males, 72 females) were identified. 63 patients sustained one or more fractures or dislocations. Upper limb fractures/dislocations occurred in 55, lower limb fractures in 8 and facial fractures in 2. Most patients demonstrated low levels of socioeconomic deprivation. In 142 cases, the wheel was caught in tram-tracks, while in 32 it slid on tracks. The latter occurred more commonly in wet conditions (p = 0.028). 151 patients answered detailed questionnaires. Ninety-eight were commuting. 112 patients intended to cross tramlines and 65 accidents occurred at a junction. Eighty patients reported traffic pressures contributed to their accident. 120 stated that their confidence was affected and 24 did not resume cycling. Female gender (p < 0.001) and presence of a fracture/dislocation (p = 0.012) were independent predictors of negative effects on confidence. Patients sustaining a fracture/dislocation spent more time off work (median 5 days vs 1, p < 0.001) and cycling (median 57 days vs 21, p < 0.001). Conclusions: TSRCI occur predominantly in young to middle-aged adults with low levels of socioeconomic deprivation, most commonly when bicycle wheels get caught in tram-tracks. They result in various injuries, frequently affecting the upper limb. Traffic pressures are commonly implicated. Most patients report negative effects on confidence and a sizeable minority do not resume cycling. TSRCI can result in significant loss of working and cycling days.
Chris Oliver
added 2 research items
https://www.cyclinguk.org/blog/olivercw/boy-stuff-cycling-prostate-and-erectile-dysfunction Cycling, the prostate and erectile dysfunction Riding a bicycle can aggravate the prostate and cause other health problems in men. The design of the standard bicycle seat can rub against the prostate during the pedalling process. A comforatble saddle is key. Prostate anatomy and problems in cyclists A healthy human prostate is classically said to be slightly larger than a walnut. It surrounds the urethra just below the urinary bladder. The prostate can enlarge to the point where urination becomes difficult. Symptoms include needing to urinateoften (frequency) or taking a while to get started (hesitancy). If the prostate grows too large, it may constrict the urethra and impede the flow of urine, making urination difficult and painful and, in extreme cases, completely impossible. Prostate problems and benign prostate (BPH) enlargement affect nearly fifty percent of men over the age of fifty. As many as ninety percent of men in their eighties may have some symptoms of BPH. Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men. However, there does not appear to be any evidence in the literature that there is any link between cycling, prostate enlargement or prostate cancer. There is weak evidence that trauma from bicycle riding can irritate the prostate and could exacerbate, and perhaps lead, to prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate) or chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Only a small number of riders get prostatitis from riding their bikes. If you are having prostate symptoms, visit your doctor or practice nurse. It is known that cycling may transiently increase a man's prostate specific antigen (PSA) level. PSA levels are often used as a key test of possible prostate problems, so men who are due to have a prostate test should avoid significant levels of cycling beforehand to avoid a possible false reading. In experimental studies, cycling causes an average 9.5% increase in PSA in healthy male cyclists greater than 50 years old, when measured within 5 minutes post-cycling. Based on the research published to date, it is suggested that a 24-48 hour period of abstinence from cycling and ejaculation before a PSA test will help avoid spurious results. Some evidence suggests than men should consider avoiding cycling during episodes of prostatitis (inflammation) or chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The main issue in regard to cycling and prostate problems is to find ways of reducing pressure on the
https://www.cyclinguk.org/blog/olivercw/why-increasing-physical-activity-important-1 Cycling can contribute to increasing physical activity and has a number of significant health benefits. There has been considerable progress promoting physical activity in Scotland.
Chris Oliver
added 16 research items
Using the concept of Lego to develop networking and research concepts in Physical Activity
Chris Oliver, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon at Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh story of getting back to cycling after bariatric surgery and how his life has become involved with physical activity advocacy and research..
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Expedition report of the 1983 British Univerisites Whitewater Kayak Expedition to the River Zap (Zab), Kurdistan, Turkey YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj_mZK7nRWk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNySl4PTvvQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvTxynA6M_0
Chris Oliver
added 3 research items
Healthcare students across the UK will recognise the profound impact of adult and childhood obesity upon the physical and psychological health and wellbeing of millions of patients and their families. Indeed, obesity and obesity-induced disease represent one of the most significant and important challenges facing our society today. In November 2016, the Obesity Action Campaign launched its National Student Health Programme (NSHP) to support health schools in the UK to better provide an environment, not only for educational excellence, but also, one that promotes the physical and psychological health and wellbeing of their students. The aim is to ensure that the next generation of healthcare professionals are equipped with the knowledge and skills they need to effectively tackle obesity in both adults and children throughout in their clinical practice.
Edinburgh Cyclists’ Tram Injuries PechaKucha - Cycling Scotland Conference 2017. 20 slides, one every twenty seconds
Chris Oliver
added a research item
Hosted by Scottish Natural Heritage in association with NHS Health Scotland and the Forestry Commission. Scotland's natural environment is an under-utilised asset for the promotion and improvement of physical and mental health and wellbeing. In particular, green exercise which denotes an active and passive engagement in the outdoors to foster better health outcomes has a significant role to play in tackling pressing health issues. The context The significance of nature to human welfare is increasingly recognised with a range of positive psychological, cognitive and physiological health outcomes achievable by using the outdoors as our 'natural health service'. A growing evidence-base for action to link the environment and the public’s health, a changing health and social care landscape and complex population needs make now an ideal time to develop and mainstream the use of Scotland's abundant natural resources across rural and urban settings to improve health and wellbeing. The event Join us to explore how developing our natural health service can help support and complement the NHS and wider healthcare delivery. We will examine the policy context, programme of interventions already underway and opportunities for organisations to work together to maximise, up-scale and co-ordinate current and future approaches. Follow #OurNaturalHealthService on Twitter
Chris Oliver
added a research item
General lecture on Physical Activity and also discussing if Pilates has a role in health promotion