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Project log

Pavlina Psychouli
added 2 research items
Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the benefit to upper limb function of a home-based version of pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy, which was delivered across 2 months. Methods: Nine children (mean age: 6 years, 9 months) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy participated in this A1-B-C-A2 design, where A1 and A2 were nonintervention phases. In phases B and C, participants wore a splint on the unaffected hand. In phase C, motivating feedback through a computer game was added. Results: The Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function and the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test scores were significantly higher at the end of phases B (P = .037 and P = .006, respectively) and C (P = .001 and P = .001, respectively). Melbourne scores remained higher at the end of phase A2 (P = .001). Conclusions: A nonintensive form of home-based constraint-induced movement therapy was found to be effective. Improvements were larger after the second month of intervention.<br/
The purpose of this study was (1) to identify the most appropriate splint from children's and parents' perspective as reflected by effectiveness and adherence to home-based forced use therapy (FUT). (2) To provide guidance in the development of a practical and effective protocol based on forced use principles. A crossover design with a convenience sample of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and their parents was used to test three types of splint (mitt, short splint and long splint) during home-based FUT. Children wore the splints for a minimum of 1 h/ day during physical activity. Outcome measures included a daily log and a questionnaire (completed by parents), an actometer worn on the affected hand to quantify movement and video recordings to inform quality of movement. The short splint was found to be the most effective and acceptable restraining device. Wearing devices for more than 1 h per day was not considered acceptable by either parents or children. A short splint, worn for 1 h per day was found to be the most acceptable protocol.