Project

PLUSS-Mathematics

Goal: An empirically grounded framework for ‘Pedagogical Listening’ to be used as a tool for teachers and teacher educators for improving how teachers listen to students.

P.L.U.S.S. = Pedagogical Listening for Understanding and supporting Student Struggle

For our Spencer Foundation supported project, PLUSS-Mathematics, we have developed an empirically grounded ‘Pedagogical Listening Framework’ for understanding and supporting students' struggle during mathematical discussions. We are continuing to develop the Pedagogical Listening Framework as a tool that can be used by teachers and teacher educators for improving teachers’ listening practices (with funding from the University of Edinburgh).


The framework is based on our empirical investigations of the role of teacher listening in supporting students’ verbalized struggles during mathematics discussions in schools in the US and Scotland. Our project builds on our collaborative philosophical and empirical research on listening within the Listening Study Group, an extensive international research group (led by Dr. English).

Date: 1 July 2016

Updates
0 new
6
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
5
Reads
0 new
249

Project log

Andrea R. English
added 2 research items
This inquiry explores the educative meaning of interruptions or breaks in teacher’s experiences by looking at their role in reflection and listening. Reflection and listening are not only two vital and distinct aspects of teaching, but are also interrelated and as such can serve to productively inform one another. In this context, I develop the notion of negativity of experience to describe the space that opens up when our experience has been in some way interrupted, the space where we dwell between old and new experiences and where new thoughts and ideas emerge. I demonstrate throughout my discussion that it is in this space that listening and reflection take place. To begin, I analyze the works of John Dewey and Donald Schön to take up a few particular aspects of reflective thinking and its relation to the practice of teaching. In this context, I point out similarities and important learning-theoretical differences between the notion of ‘negativity of experience’ and Schön’s notion of ‘messy situations’. The second section examines the role of negativity of experience in listening. Here, I seek to explore ways to include listening in the contemporary discussion on reflective teaching and practice. The inquiry concludes by considering the meaning of reflection, listening and negativity for the education of professional teachers.
In this groundbreaking book, Andrea English challenges common assumptions by arguing that discontinuous experiences, such as uncertainty and struggle, are essential to the learning process. To make this argument, Dr. English draws from the works of two seminal thinkers in philosophy of education - nineteenth-century German philosopher J. F. Herbart and American Pragmatist John Dewey. English's analysis considers Herbart's influence on Dewey, inverting the accepted interpretation of Dewey's thought as a dramatic break from modern European understandings of education. Three key concepts-- transformational learning, tact in teaching, and perfectibility-- emerge from this analysis to revitalize our understanding of education as a transformational process. Dr. English's comparative approach interweaves European and Anglo-American traditions of educational thought with a contemporary scholarly perspective, contributing to a work that is both intellectually rewarding and applicable to a classroom setting. The result is a book that is essential reading for philosophers and scholars of education, as well as educators.
Andrea R. English
added an update
We are currently working with Laura Tuohilampi on an extension Project: 'Listen to Me'. This project will be working with 4 Finnish school teachers, utilizing our 'Pedagogical Listening Framework' as a tool to support these teachers' active development of the types of listening that support students' mathematical thinking and doing.
The project involves University of Edinburgh and University of Helsinki and the Swedish speaking section of the Finnish National Agency of Education.
 
Andrea R. English
added an update
Our paper was entitled: 'Pedagogical Listening: Hearing and Responding to Student Struggle' (Washington DC, Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Wednesday April 24, 11:30-12:45.)
We received great audience feedback that we are currently working into our paper.
Our next steps include:
●Continuing to embed the work in equity and
rehumanization discourses in Mathematics
education
● Deeper investigation of the connection
between rigorous mathematical tasks and
pedagogical listening
● Co-develop our tools with and for teachers
to deepen our understanding of Pedagogical
Listening
 
Andrea R. English
added 5 research items
In this groundbreaking book, Andrea English challenges common assumptions by arguing that discontinuous experiences, such as uncertainty and struggle, are essential to the learning process. To make this argument, Dr English draws from the works of two seminal thinkers in philosophy of education - nineteenth-century German philosopher J. F. Herbart and American pragmatist John Dewey. English's analysis considers Herbart's influence on Dewey, inverting the accepted interpretation of Dewey's thought as a dramatic break from modern European understandings of education. Three key concepts - transformational learning, tact in teaching, and perfectibility - emerge from this analysis to revitalize our understanding of education as a transformational process. Dr English's comparative approach interweaves European and Anglo-American traditions of educational thought with a contemporary scholarly perspective, contributing to a work that is both intellectually rewarding and applicable to a classroom setting. The result is a book that is essential reading for philosophers and scholars of education, as well as educators. http://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/psychology/educational-psychology/discontinuity-learning-dewey-herbart-and-education-transformation?format=AR#TArb37pxSfzDrJym.97
This response to Dr. Crystal Kalinec-Craig’s article on “The Rights of the Learner (RotL)” aims to take up and build on the author’s ideas about how the RotL framework can promote equitable mathematics teaching and learning. Specifically, this response examines how listening is implied in the work of teachers who support young mathematicians as they exercise their rights to be confused, claim mistakes, listen, and say and write what makes sense. In doing so, we seek to highlight some of the opportunities and challenges that can emerge for teachers attempting to support all learners to actualize these Rights.
Andrea R. English
added an update
Next Week we will present our findings at The American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting in New York (Research in Mathematics Education SIG), http://tinyurl.com/y992tvqd :
"Pedagogical Listening: Rehumanizing mathematics by decentering talk and listening for humanity"
Abstract: What does it mean to be heard and why does it matter for learning mathematics? We conceptualize the rehumanization of mathematics through the lens of teacher as listener. The work of rehumanizing mathematics with students who have been underserved by a system that has been engineered by and for dominant culture, requires a shift in understanding what it means to teach and learn mathematics. We contend this change requires a recentering from a focus on talk to a focus on listening. Teachers who have a pedagogy of listening that goes beyond listening for “the right answer” to listening for the voices, identities, understandings and resources of previously silenced voices support children, through their humanity, to make mathematics their own.
Our talk will be on the Roundtable: "Strategies and Tools for Supporting the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics", on Tue, April 17, 10:35am to 12:05pm, at New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Trianon Ballroom.
 
Andrea R. English
added a project goal
An empirically grounded framework for ‘Pedagogical Listening’ to be used as a tool for teachers and teacher educators for improving how teachers listen to students.
P.L.U.S.S. = Pedagogical Listening for Understanding and supporting Student Struggle
For our Spencer Foundation supported project, PLUSS-Mathematics, we have developed an empirically grounded ‘Pedagogical Listening Framework’ for understanding and supporting students' struggle during mathematical discussions. We are continuing to develop the Pedagogical Listening Framework as a tool that can be used by teachers and teacher educators for improving teachers’ listening practices (with funding from the University of Edinburgh).
The framework is based on our empirical investigations of the role of teacher listening in supporting students’ verbalized struggles during mathematics discussions in schools in the US and Scotland. Our project builds on our collaborative philosophical and empirical research on listening within the Listening Study Group, an extensive international research group (led by Dr. English).