Project

Organizational Change and Public Sector Work

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42

Project log

Stephen T T Teo
added a research item
Workplace bullying are prevalent among the nursing workforce. Consequences of workplace bullying include psychological stress and workplace accidents and injuries. Psychological hardiness is proposed as a buffer for workplace bullying and psychological stress on workplace accidents and injuries. This study adopted the Affective Events Theory and Conservation of Resources Theory to develop and test a moderated mediated model in two field studies. Study 1 (N = 286, Australian nurses) found support for the direct negative effect of workplace bullying on workplace accidents and injuries with psychological stress acting as the mediator. The mediation findings from Study 1 were replicated in Study 2 (N = 201, New Zealand nurses). In addition, Study 2 supplemented Study 1 by providing empirical support for using psychological hardiness as the buffer for the association between psychological stress and workplace accidents and injuries. This study offers theoretical and empirical insights into the research and practice on psychological hardiness for improving the psychological well-being of employees who faced workplace mistreatments.
Stephen T T Teo
added a research item
This study contributes to Hobfoll's Conservation of Resources theory by testing a moderated mediation model of the relationship between participation in change and senior managers’ hedonic well‐being. Using data collected from 266 Australian senior managers employed in the Commonwealth and State public sector, we tested the interaction of participation in change and change information with job satisfaction, an example of hedonic well‐being at work. Findings from the path analysis produced two new insights. First, both participation in change and information about change are key resources that senior managers can deploy to protect and enhance their job satisfaction. Second, information about change has a buffering effect on the indirect relationship between participation in change and job satisfaction through job control. These two findings have practical implications indicating that it is important to train and equip senior managers in the adoption of effective strategies to acquire job resources in assisting them deal with change induced job demands.
Stephen T T Teo
added 2 research items
The aim of this paper is to examine the relationships between authentic leadership, person-organization fit, workplace incivility, and psychological stress. In doing so we contribute to resolving theoretical and practical questions about how leadership behaviors can improve the job experiences and outcomes of employees. To this end we undertake a two-wave survey of 600 nurses (wave one) and 230 matched responses in wave two. The results suggest significant positive relationships exist between authentic leadership and person-organization fit and between workplace incivility and psychological stress. We also find that person-organization fit mediates the incidence of workplace incivility and its effects on psychological stress. We conclude that these results inform the development of theory about authentic leadership and the work environment.
Stephen T T Teo
added a research item
This study examines how middle managers in public sector organizations experienced ‘New Public Management’ (NPM)-related change initiatives. Data from 486 Australian middle managers in state public sector agencies are analysed and the hypothesized model is tested using partial least squares (PLS) structural equations modelling (SEM) on two samples. The cross-validation model analysis brings a new focus on middle managers experience of change via the linkages between the provision of change information, change-induced stressors and the job satisfaction of employees. The ‘need for information’ is an important element in understanding the consequences of change.
Stephen T T Teo
added a research item
The main aim of this study is to develop a path model to examine the effect of administrative stressors on nursing work outcomes in a sample of Australian public and non-profit nurses. The implementation of managerial reform initiatives has negative consequences on work outcomes. However, less is known about the effects of these stressors in public and non-profit health care organisations. An online, self-completion questionnaire was sent to a random sample of nurses, employed in nursing-related occupations. Useable surveys were received from 251 nurses. The path model was analysed using SmartPLS software (SmartPLS, Hamburg, Germany). Public and non-profit nurses experienced time and resource administrative-related stressors (such as resource shortage and pay not as good as other people doing similar work). They relied on work-related social support to reduce the negative consequences. Resource stressors led to job dissatisfaction while time stressors led to psychological strain. Nursing staff who reported better psychological health reported higher job satisfaction and higher level of commitment towards their organisations. Context-specific administrative stressors have a negative impact on the work outcomes of public and non-profit nurses. Work-related social support mechanisms were found to mediate the negative consequences of administrative resourcing stressors on nursing job satisfaction. Nursing managers have to be sympathetic and care for the negative experiences of nursing staff, especially when there is an increasing level of administrative expectations during organisational change. Senior management should take note of the stressors caused by the lack of resources such as information, staffing and resources, as these were found to lead to an increase in nurses seeking work-related social support from their peers and supervisors. Effective implementation of these strategies would lead to a nursing workforce, which has higher level of psychological health, job satisfaction and organisational commitment.
Stephen T T Teo
added 2 research items
To examine the mediating effect of coping strategies on the consequences of nursing and non-nursing (administrative) stressors on the job satisfaction of nurses during change management. Organisational change can result in an increase in nursing and non-nursing-related stressors, which can have a negative impact on the job satisfaction of nurses employed in health-care organisations. Matched data were collected in 2009 via an online survey at two time-points (six months apart). Partial least squares path analysis revealed a significant causal relationship between Time 1 administrative and role stressors and an increase in nursing-specific stressors in Time 2. A significant relationship was also identified between job-specific nursing stressors and the adoption of effective coping strategies to deal with increased levels of change-induced stress and strain and the likelihood of reporting higher levels of job satisfaction in Time 2. The effectiveness of coping strategies is critical in helping nurses to deal with the negative consequences of organisational change. This study shows that there is a causal relationship between change, non-nursing stressors and job satisfaction. Senior management should implement strategies aimed at reducing nursing and non-nursing stress during change in order to enhance the job satisfaction of nurses.
Scholars have argued that it is necessary develop new theoretical perspectives in order to better understand how managers, as change agents in public sector agencies, react to change. This study is a response to this call by adopting a Social Information Processing theoretical lens to investigate the consequences of managerialist-inspired change initiatives on employee outcomes in public sector organizations. Survey data about experiences of change initiatives, participation in change decision making, and provision of change information, change-induced stressors, and job satisfaction and psychological wellbeing were collected from a cross-sectional sample of 659 public sector managerial employees from agencies across Australia. The dataset was randomly split into a calibration and a validation sample to empirically test a hypothesized model using Partial Least Squares analysis. Statistically significant paths common to the calibration and validation samples showed that public sector agencies implemented flexibility-focus change initiatives that are related to an increase in change-induced stress. There is also evidence to suggest that provision of change information reduced change-induced stressors, but contrary to expectation, participation in change decision-making increased stressors. Overall, the evidence suggests that top management led flexibility-focus change initiatives induces stress, job dis-satisfaction and psychological strain.