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Open Innovation

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Project log

Georges Romme
added a research item
The aim of this paper is to analyze how the governance of an enterprise blockchain ecosystem changes as it matures and increases in size. A review of the literature serves to identify five behavioral drivers of governance, which appear to affect the long-term viability of a blockchain ecosystem: access rights, decision rights, incentives, accountability, and conflict resolution. We subsequently report the findings from a comparative case study of how three large blockchain ecosystems implemented various governance mechanisms to exploit and modify the five behavioral drivers over time. Based on twenty-six interviews and approximately 200 h of participant observations, we propose an analytical framework that consists of three distinctive stages in the life cycle of a blockchain ecosystem. Each stage is characterized by an intricate relationship between off-chain and on-chain governance mechanisms. Based on these findings, various recommendations are provided to increase the long-term viability of blockchain ecosystems.
Georges Romme
added a research item
Transition intermediaries are actors that support socio-technical transition processes by bridging structural deficiencies in a transitioning domain. Previous research has identified what roles transition intermediaries perform and how. However, while transitioning domains are by definition in a state of change, the dynamics of transition intermediaries have hardly been studied. Therefore, we explore what mechanisms are driving change in transition-supportive roles of intermediaries, and what kind of conditions enable an intermediary to be dynamically adaptive in supporting a transitioning domain. These questions are addressed in a longitudinal case study of a major European intermediary in sustainable energy. We find this intermediary changed its transition support activities as a result of the frontline staff continually exploring the needs of transition stakeholders and designing new value offerings in response. These role dynamics are enabled by a structure where the policy principal delegates the choice of support activity and external accountability to the intermediary, which organizes itself in a customer-oriented manner. As such, we conclude that the dynamics in intermediaries’ transition activities arise from the interplay between policy mandate, organizational structure/design, and staff agency.
Georges Romme
added a research item
The development of a suitable public charging system for electric vehicles relies on inputs from many complementary organizations that need to synchronize interdependencies across different activities, organizations, and industries. Research on temporal fit has focused on synchronizing activities within or external to the organization, rather than exploring synchronization across multiple organizations with highly interdependent yet colliding temporal structures and multiple time-givers. Drawing on a case study of a collaborative effort to create a national charging infrastructure for electric vehicles, we theorize the interplay between various highly interdependent actors. The resulting theory posits that actors combine and shift between different innovation practices to organize time and explains how multiple, yet interdependent actors engaging in temporal work attempt to accomplish temporal fit. Three entrainment dynamics are identified: (1) temporal tug-of-war through ecosystem configuration; (2) temporal dictating through group politics; and (3) ecosystem navigation through temporal ambivalence. These dynamics arise both between and within groups of actors when they coordinate innovation practices across multiple temporal structures and time-givers. Together, the simultaneous pursuit of synchronization within and across these different coalitions appears to constrain the realization of the collective goal.
Georges Romme
added 2 research items
Purpose: Knowledge sharing is a process where individuals mutually exchange knowledge to create new knowledge. Understanding the knowledge-sharing process, during which organizations share spaces, facilities and services, is highly important for owners/managers who seek to optimize their business centres and to attract more innovative tenants. For users of business centres, it is interesting to know how, where and what type of knowledge is shared. However, there is hardly any research into sharing different types of knowledge in business centres. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the influence of personal and organizational characteristics on sharing different types of knowledge within and between organizations in business centres. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected using a questionnaire that was completed by 268 users of 53 business centres in The Netherlands. A seemingly unrelated regression analysis was used to simultaneously analyse the influence of personal and organizational characteristics on knowledge sharing in business centres. Findings: The results show that public and private non-codified knowledge is more frequently shared with people from other organizations by those who more frequently use an event space, lounge space, canteen or consultancy services. Knowledge sharing with colleagues within organizations was influenced by the use of individual closed workspaces, meeting spaces and restaurant/canteen and gender. Originality/value: The study suggests that owners and managers of business centres can optimize their business centres by offering specific facilities, services and workspaces to attract a specific group of tenants. In addition, organizations that want to enhance knowledge sharing with other organizations need to stimulate their employees to use shared facilities and services.
In many urban environments, so-called Living Labs have been created. A Living Lab (LL) is an emerging innovation methodology that may serve to reduce the gap between new technology development and the adoption of this new technology by users, by bringing together all key actors in the innovation process: public administration, education institutes, companies, and citizens. However, a substantial number of LLs struggle to translate the customer value created into a sustainable business model. As a result, many LLs are financially not sustainable. Several previous studies found that most LLs primarily rely on public grants; thus, they often stop their activities when public funding ends. In this paper, we draw on a comprehensive literature review and practical evidence from three cases, to develop a framework of various funding options which can be employed by any LL that seeks to become more financially sustainable.
Georges Romme
added a research item
Technology-driven companies, local governments, research institutes and universities are looking increasingly for opportunities to collaborate in so-called innovation ecosystems to fuel economic growth, international competitiveness, and social well-being. The Brainport-Eindhoven region in the Netherlands is a prime example of a well-functioning innovation ecosystem. Eindhoven was praised by Forbes in 2013 as the most inventive city in the world, and Business Insider and The New York Times described the Eindhoven region as a role model for design and technology experimentation. Historically, the region’s current success has been driven by companies like Philips and DAF, but also by cutting-edge technology manufacturers like ASML and NXP, the availability of high-end research facilities, and various top-level universities and schools such as TU/e and Design Academy Eindhoven. Most innovation work in this region is done on campus-locations such as the High Tech Campus Eindhoven (HTCE), TU/e Campus, Automotive Campus, and Strijp S. Especially the HTCE is often praised as “the smartest square kilometer in the world.” However, the past and current level of performance of the Eindhoven region does not give any guarantee of its success in the future. Moreover, due to globalization and scarcity of resources, regions are increasingly competing for talent and resources. As a result, it will become more and more difficult to survive and stand out. In this white paper, we therefore explore how the Eindhoven region can be made more future proof. Or more specifically: what are the conditions, to be created in the next few years, which enable the regional ecosystem to become more future proof and viable in the long run?
Georges Romme
added 7 research items
The gap between theory and practice is a persistent problem in management and organization research. In this respect, several scholars have suggested that ‘design’ is an ideal-typical form of mode 2 knowledge production. Design research develops knowledge in the service of action and problem solving in organizational settings. In this paper, we connect two perspectives on design that can be considered to be largely complementary but have hardly been combined and integrated in practice: science-based design drawing on design propositions grounded in research and human-centred design emphasizing an active and systematic participation by users and other stakeholders. An integrated approach that builds on both perspectives is developed and subsequently applied to designing and developing a portal for mapping competencies in an information technology cluster. This project involves creating problem awareness and articulating design propositions as well as developing scenarios of use, experimenting with prototypes, and organizational transformation. As such, this methodology addresses the dual challenge of rigour and relevance by producing both scientific and practical knowledge.
Path-breaking innovations are increasingly developed and commercialized by networks of co-creating actors, so-called innovation ecosystems. Previous work in this area has demonstrated that, to create and appropriate value, ecosystem actors should align their activities. The effort of a focal venture to bring its ecosystem actors to alignment can be coined the internal development of the ecosystem. However, literature has largely overlooked that the success of the innovation ecosystem also depends on its external viability in the socio- technical environment. Path-breaking innovations inherently challenge the prevailing socio-technical regime (e.g., established infrastructure, rules and artifacts) that is resistant to change. We develop a systemic multi- level perspective on how a focal venture develops an innovation ecosystem for path- breaking innovation so that it is both internally aligned and externally viable. NB: This paper was later revised and accepted for publication in Technological Forecasting & Social Change: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316240226_A_multi-level_perspective_on_innovation_ecosystems_for_path-breaking_innovation
Path-breaking innovations are increasingly developed and commercialized by networks of co-creating actors, called innovation ecosystems. Previous work in this area demonstrates that the ‘internal’ alignment of actors is critical to value creation in the innovation ecosystem. However, the literature has largely overlooked that the success of an innovation ecosystem also depends on its ‘external’ viability, determined by the broader socio-technical environment. That is, path-breaking innovations inherently challenge the prevailing socio-technical regime in a domain (e.g., established rules, artifacts and habits) that tends to be resistant to change. Overcoming this resistance is a major challenge for ventures pioneering path-breaking innovations. The paper contributes to the literature on innovation ecosystems by explicitly considering the socio-technical viability of the innovation ecosystem around a path-breaking innovation. In particular, we theorize about the objects of manipulation in an innovation ecosystem and discuss the strategies that a focal venture, orchestrating the innovation ecosystem, can employ in manipulating these objects so as to increase the socio-technical viability of the ecosystem. We arrive at a multi-level perspective on innovation ecosystem development that integrates internal alignment and external viability and informs a research agenda for future studies in this field.