Project

ORIENT - Use of care robots in welfare services: New models for effective orientation

Goal: Orientation is here defined as introduction to technology use and learning of different skills for effective use in the spirit of cocreation. Various obstacles to care robot acceptance and shortcomings in their use have been identified. In this ORIENT project, new methods and models will be developed for orientation into care robot use – taking into account the needs of older customers and their relatives as a first priority. Caregivers, care service organizations and the societal level, other stakeholders in the ‘innovation ecosystem’ such as business and industry, public administration and the nonprofit sector, are also included. Knowledge, know-how, know-why and know-what will be boosted by active interaction between ORIENT and people utilizing the results. ORIENT’s societal and social objectives are to smoothen the co-creation of care robot technology and service innovations by identifying, characterizing and developing best practices for orientation into care robot use at the different levels of the ecosystem. This is also expected to contribute to economic objectives, such as more effective use of technology in welfare services, with careful attention to the needs of responsible research. The proposal builds on close cross-border collaboration and exchange. The scientific objective is to link the traditionally practice-oriented theme of orientation to the theories of sociotechnical transition, where new technologies are seen to contribute to broader societal changes.

Date: 1 April 2018 - 31 March 2020

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Project log

Outi Tuisku
added a research item
Exploring the specific field of care robot orientation generates many questions regarding the meaning, content and how it should be conducted. The issue is important due to the general digitalisation and implementation of welfare technology and care robots. The aim of the study was to explore perceptions of care robot orientation from the potential users’ perspective. Data were collected by focus group interviews in Finland, Germany and Sweden. In all three countries, potential user groups were represented: older adults, relatives, professional caregivers and care service managers. A qualitative descriptive method was used for analysing data. The data revealed three aspects of care robot orientation: (1) What care robot orientation is, (2) Who needs it and by Whom it should be given and (3) How it should be performed. The need for care robot orientation is general in society. In the absence of knowledge about care robots, it is nearly impossible to know what to ask for or actually seek information about. Therefore, care robot orientation must be founded on agile implementation planning for care robots, with a firm basis in trustworthy knowledge and information and respecting individuals’ wishes. This also gives rise to an ethical challenge when care robots are offered to people having reduced decision-making ability (dementia, cognitive impairment), along with the issue of who then should make the decision. The mapping of the What, Who/Whom and How aspects of care robot orientation offers a foundation for the creation of orientation models, which might facilitate structured and goal-oriented care robot orientation strategies.
Outi Tuisku
added a research item
This paper explores Finnish, German and Swedish older adults’ perceptions of a future welfare service with increased use of welfare technologies, specifically care robots. The issues are the rapid digitalization and development of health and welfare technology, which presently is mainly technology driven (not need or user driven), and the demographic challenge. The aim of the study was to explore older adults’ perception of the future use of welfare technology or care robots. A qualitative approach with focus group discussions was employed, followed by thematic analysis. The results are presented in four overall themes: the impact on daily life for older adults and professional caregivers, codes of practice and terms of use, dissemination of information and knowledge, and conditions for successful implementation. There were significant differences in the informants’ attitudes toward and knowledge about care robots. However, the informants’ attitudes appeared to change during the focus groups and in general, became more positive. Authentic needs, which care robots could support, refer to independence, safety and security, and the ability to manage or ease daily life or working life. The results suggest that older adults, after receiving relevant information, were open to the idea of being supported by care robots in their daily lives.
Christine Gustafsson
added an update
Accepted conference proceeding at the conference HCI 2019 in Florida: http://2019.hci.international/
By: Rose-Marie Johansson Pajala, Kirsten Thommes, Julia Amelie Hoppe, Helinä Melkas, Outi Tuisku, Lea Hennala, Satu Pekkarinen, Christine Gustafsson
The study will be presented at the parallel session: "Being Connected at Home – Making use of digital devices in later life" Thematic Area: Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population
is now approved for publication in the Conference Proceedings.
The Conference Proceedings will be published by Springer in a multi-volume set.
The Conference Proceedings will be available on-line through the SpringerLink Digital Library, readily accessible by all subscribing libraries around the world. A
Abstract preview: The paper explores Finnish, German and Swedish older adults’
perceptions of a future welfare service with increased use of welfare technologies,
specifically care robots. . The aim of the study
was to explore older adults’ perception of the future use of welfare technology or
care robots. A qualitative approach with focus group discussions was employed,
followed by thematic analysis. The results are presented in four overall themes
 
Christine Gustafsson
added an update
A conference procceding for the conference HCI 2019 (http://2019.hci.international/) has been accepted.
Authors: Rose-Marie Johansson-Pajala, Kirsten Thommes, Julia A. Hoppe, Outi Tuisku,
Lea Hennala, Satu Pekkarinen, Helinä Melkas and Christine Gustafsson
Abstract preview:
The paper explores Finnish, German and Swedish older adults’ perceptions of a future welfare service with increased use of welfare technologies, specifically care robots. The aim of the study
was to explore older adults’ perception of the future use of welfare technology or care robots. A qualitative approach with focus group discussions was employed,followed by thematic analysis.
The study will be presented in the parallel session: "Being Connected at Home – Making use of digital devices in later life" Thematic Area: Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population
The Conference Proceedings will be published by Springer in a multi-volume set.
The Conference Proceedings will be available on-line through the SpringerLink Digital Library, readily accessible by all subscribing libraries around the world. All Conference participants will receive in their registration bags the Conference Proceedings in electronic format
 
Christine Gustafsson
added an update
Funding from JPI More Years Better Life, decision in November 2017. Coordinator professor Helinä Melkas Lahti University in Finland. Project partners professor Kirsten Thommes, Brandenburg University in Germany and Associate professor Christine Gustafsson and senior lecturer Rose-Marie Johansson Pajala, Mälardalen University in Sweden. Project will start i April 2018.
 
Christine Gustafsson
added a project goal
Orientation is here defined as introduction to technology use and learning of different skills for effective use in the spirit of cocreation. Various obstacles to care robot acceptance and shortcomings in their use have been identified. In this ORIENT project, new methods and models will be developed for orientation into care robot use – taking into account the needs of older customers and their relatives as a first priority. Caregivers, care service organizations and the societal level, other stakeholders in the ‘innovation ecosystem’ such as business and industry, public administration and the nonprofit sector, are also included. Knowledge, know-how, know-why and know-what will be boosted by active interaction between ORIENT and people utilizing the results. ORIENT’s societal and social objectives are to smoothen the co-creation of care robot technology and service innovations by identifying, characterizing and developing best practices for orientation into care robot use at the different levels of the ecosystem. This is also expected to contribute to economic objectives, such as more effective use of technology in welfare services, with careful attention to the needs of responsible research. The proposal builds on close cross-border collaboration and exchange. The scientific objective is to link the traditionally practice-oriented theme of orientation to the theories of sociotechnical transition, where new technologies are seen to contribute to broader societal changes.