Project

Noise and Ototoxic Agent Exposures' Association with Hearing Health

Goal: Reduce hearing health morbidity through enhance control of occupational noise and chemical stressor exposures.

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Project log

Nicholas Schaal
added a research item
This presentation describes the ototoxicity and auditory research program at Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton. Background and significance of hearing loss to include auditory and non-auditory effects of noise and hearing loss were discussed. The term “ototoxicants” was defined and basis for ACGIH TLVs for ototoxicants was explained. Mechanisms of action for ototoxicants and historical studies revealing both peripheral and central auditory pathway dysfunction as a toxic endpoint were evaluated. Finally, current studies involving combined exposure to jet fuel and noise being conducted at Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton were discussed. Capabilities for noise and fuel exposure and auditory testing with auditory brainstem response, distortion product otoacoustic emissions, and auditory structure histopathology capabilities were discussed. The presentation was concluded be detailing future research needs in the field of ototoxicity.
Nicholas Schaal
added 2 research items
Noise has traditionally been considered the primary risk factor for hearing loss. However, due to the complexity of industrial environments, a worker may be exposed to up to three hazardous agents simultaneously in the workplace so it may be inappropriate to restrict occupational hearing loss to only a noise-induced origin. This presentation lists noise and chemical OELs and their basis for promulgation, explains the definition of ototoxicants, presents results of previous studies investigating ototoxicants, and discusses Occupational Hygiene organization guidance.
Noise has traditionally been considered the primary risk factor for hearing loss. However, due to the complexity of industrial environments, a worker may be exposed to up to three hazardous agents simultaneously in the workplace so it may be inappropriate to restrict occupational hearing loss to only a noise-induced origin. Noise levels may not need to be above Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) for the combined effects to manifest themselves. No regulations promulgated explicitly to control hearing loss from chemical exposure. The presentation explain the definition of ototoxicants, affected industries and ototoxicant chemicals, occupational hygiene organization guidance, hazard identification/prevention, assessment, and control techniques, exposure assessment challenges, and opportunities for future investigation.
Nicholas Schaal
added a research item
Noise has traditionally been considered the primary risk factor for hearing loss. However, due to the complexity of industrial environments, the 1996 NIOSH publication “Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss—A Practical Guide” estimated that a worker may be exposed to up to three hazardous agents simultaneously in the workplace; for this reason, it may be inappropriate to restrict occupational hearing loss to only a noise-induced origin. Recent evidence suggests that exposures to chemicals commonly found in industrial environments may affect hearing alone or in combination with noise exposure.
Nicholas Schaal
added a research item
Noise has traditionally been considered the primary risk factor for hearing loss. However, due to the complexity of industrial environments, the 1996 NIOSH publication “Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss—A Practical Guide” estimated that a worker may be exposed to up to three hazardous agents simultaneously in the workplace; for this reason, it may be inappropriate to restrict occupational hearing loss to only a noise-induced origin. Recent evidence suggests that exposures to chemicals commonly found in industrial environments may affect hearing alone or in combination with noise exposure.
Jeremy Slagley
added an update
J. Trawick's publication from his thesis work. Also presented at the 2018 International Occupational Hygiene Association in Washington, DC.
 
Jeremy Slagley
added a project goal
Reduce hearing health morbidity through enhance control of occupational noise and chemical stressor exposures.