Project

Neuroception of Psychological Safety Scale

Goal: Developing a standardised measure of psychological safety.

Date: 1 May 2019

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Liza Morton
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Neuroception of Psychological Safety Scale (NPSS)
Manual and Scoring Guide
Morton, L., Cogan, N., Kolacz, J., Calderwood, C., Nikolič, M., Bacon, T., Pathe, E., Williams, D., Porges, S. (2021) ©
Development and psychometric properties described in:
Morton, L., Cogan, N., Kolacz, J., Calderwood, C., Nikolic, M., Bacon, T., Pathe, E., Williams, D., & Porges, S. W. (2022). A new measure of feeling safe: Developing psychometric properties of the Neuroception of Psychological Safety Scale (NPSS). Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001313
This measure is free to use for research and educational purposes. However, we ask that you please contact the lead author Liza Morton (Liza.Morton@gcu.ac.uk) for permission before using it.
Please keep us updated with your feedback on the scale to assist us with its development and guidance for use.
 
Liza Morton
added a research item
Objective: Psychological safety is increasingly recognised as central to mental health, wellbeing and post-traumatic growth. To date, there is no psychometrically supported measure of psychological safety combining psychological, physiological and social components. The current research aimed to develop and establish the neuroception of psychological safety scale (NPSS), informed by Polyvagal Theory. Method: The study comprised of three stages: (1) item generation, (2) item reduction, and (3) assessment of factor structure and internal consistency. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was conducted from two samples who completed a survey online (exploratory n = 342, confirmatory n = 455). Results: Initially, 107 items were generated. Item reduction and exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 29-item NPSS with subscales of compassion, social engagement and body sensations. The NPSS was found to have a consistent factor structure and internal consistency. Conclusion: The NPSS is a novel measure of psychological safety which can be used across a range of health and social care settings. This research provides a platform for further work to support and enhance understandings of the science of safety through the measurement of psychological, relational and physiological components of safety. The NPSS will help shape new approaches to evaluating trauma treatments, relational issues and mental health concerns. Research to establish the convergent, discriminant and concurrent validity of the NPSS and to explore its use with diverse community and clinical populations is underway.
Liza Morton
added an update
Please find attached copies of our Preliminary Neuroception of Psychological Safety Scale (NPSS) Specific (NPSS-S) and Generic (NPSS-G). Please carefully read the guidance below (and on the measure).
Guidance notes:
This scale aims to provide a standardised measure of psychological safety grounded in The Polyvagal Theory.
A higher score indicates higher feelings of psychological safety, it is important to note that this is likely to vary depending on context (for example, being at work versus being at home).
The establishment of the psychometric properties of the NPSS are under development, please contact (nicola.cogan@strath.ac.uk or liza.morton@gla.ac.uk) for further information.
While this measure is free to use, please contact us for permission beforehand.
Please keep us updated with your feedback on the scale to assist us with its development and guidance for use.
We invite comments and reflections about the usability of the scale across clinical and research settings.
Thank you for your interest in this work,
Citation: Morton, L., Cogan, N., Kolacz, J., Calderwood, C., Nikolič, M., Bacon, T., Pathe, E., Williams, D., Porges, S (2021) Developing a standardised measure of psychological safety, 35th Annual Conference of the European Health Psychology Society
 
Liza Morton
added a research item
Background: Psychological safety is increasingly recognised as central to mental health and wellbeing. The Polyvagal Theory offers a ‘Science of Safety’ which can help inform clinical practice to promote wellbeing, resilience and post-traumatic growth, whilst mitigating trauma. To date, there is no standardised measure of psychological safety comprising psychological, physiological and social components. The current study aims to develop such a self-report measure. Methods: The study comprised three stages: First, seven key stakeholders with expertise in trauma, applied psychology and The Polyvagal Theory generated 107 items using a variation of the Delphi method. The second stage aimed to reduce the number of items and assess the underlying factor structure. Participants (n =342) completed the 107 item measure which was disseminated via an anonymised, online Qualtrics survey. Exploratory factor analysis guided by Cronbach’s alpha and omega coefficients resulted in a reduced scale with 29 items of psychological safety. Ethical approval was granted by the University of Strathclyde ethics committee. Current stage of work: Data collection began for the final phase in February 2021 and should be completed by June 2021. The 29 item ‘safety measure’ has been disseminated via an online Qualtrics survey with five other measures for the purpose of comprehensive psychometric validation via tests of dimensionality, reliability, known groups, criterion, convergent, predictive and discriminant validity. Expected results: The findings will result in a psychometrically validated measure of psychological safety. Discussion: The development of a holistic, standardised measure of psychological safety will benefit both academic and clinical work.
Liza Morton
added a project goal
Developing a standardised measure of psychological safety.