Project

Network of Experts on Social Dimension of Education and Training (NESET)

Goal: NESET is an advisory network of experts working on the social dimension of education and training, which provides reliable, independent and rigorous scientific support, country specific expertise, and advice to the European Commission in relation to the equity and social aspects of all types and levels of education and training.

For more information see: http://nesetweb.eu/en/

Date: 1 January 2015 - 31 December 2022

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Project log

Dalibor Sternadel
added a research item
Due to COVID-19, every EU Member State was affected by partial or total closures of educational institutions. The report provides a review of the available evidence on the impact of COVID-19-related school disruptions on student learning outcomes at primary and secondary level across the EU, and characterises the various factors identified as having had an impact on student learning. These factors include a reduction in teaching and learning time, in the frequency of individual contact with teachers, and in the capacity of teachers and students to adapt to distance education. The report also analyses the available evidence on the role of the digital education in supporting students’ academic achievement in the context of distance schooling.
Cosmin Nada
added an update
Due to COVID-19, every EU Member State was affected by partial or total closures of educational institutions. The report provides a review of the available evidence on the impact of COVID-19-related school disruptions on student learning outcomes at primary and secondary level across the EU, and characterises the various factors identified as having had an impact on student learning. These factors include a reduction in teaching and learning time, in the frequency of individual contact with teachers, and in the capacity of teachers and students to adapt to distance education.  The report also analyses the available evidence on the role of the digital education in supporting students’ academic achievement in the context of distance schooling.
Report author: Dalibor Sternadel
To access the full report, please follow the link below:
 
Cosmin Nada
added an update
NESET presents a new analytical report entitled “Governing quality Early Childhood Education and Care in a global crisis: first lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic”.
The report was prepared by Katrien Van Laere, Nima Sharmahd, Arianna Lazzari, Martino Serapioni, Sanja Brajković, Ingrid Engdahl, Henriette Heimgaertner, Liesbeth Lambert, and Hester Hulpia.
The authors explore the different ways in which European Union Member States have attempted to ensure high-quality Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) for children and families in times of COVID-19.
The report provides a synthesis of emerging evidence on how COVID-19 has affected following aspects of ECEC:
📷 Accessibility
📷 Workforce
📷 Curriculum
📷 Monitoring and evaluation
📷 Governance and funding.
Access the full report, executive summaries in English, French and German, and a summarising one-pager in the NESET Library:
 
Valeria Cavioni
added a research item
This analytical report seeks to address the evident gap in the formative assessment of social and emotional education by providing a framework indicating how social and emotional education may be assessed through a whole-school approach, both at individual (learner) and contextual (classroom climate and whole school system) levels, accompanied by illustrations of how this may be carried out in schools. It presents a framework of guiding principles for the formative assessment of social and emotional education within the EU, and provides various tools that may be used to formatively assess social and emotional education at the levels of the individual learner, classroom climate and whole-school system. The report also identifies a number of areas that need to be addressed in order to advance the effective implementation of the formative assessment of social and emotional education in the EU. This report should serve as a platform for the development of a formative, collaborative, systemic and inclusive European identity for SEE assessment, in contrast with other individualistic, personality- and character-based, and normative modes of assessment. It also provides a more integrated framework for the assessment of SEE in the EU and helps to bring greater consistency to assessment practices for this key competence at regional, national and European levels.
Cosmin Nada
added an update
NESET has just published an analytical report that provides a background analysis on the development, provision and recognition of micro-credentials.
Towards a European approach to micro-credentials: a study of practices and commonalities in offering micro-credentials in European higher education”, co-authored by Dominic Orr, Mantas Pupinis and Greta Kirdulyte, aims to provide a background analysis that will inform the European Commission with regard to the development, provision and recognition of micro-credentials. This will feed into a wider consultation and analysis for a European approach to micro-credentials.
The report focuses on the higher education sector, but where relevant, it also extends to other sectors. The report also provides a catalogue of best practices related to micro-credentials.
These real-life examples of practices that have been successfully applied by higher education institutions as well as other education providers, businesses and public organisations, will allow stakeholders to move beyond abstract theoretical ideas, and will encourage the wider adoption of micro-credentials.
A full version of the report can be found on the NESET website: https://nesetweb.eu/en/reports/analytical-reports/
 
Cosmin Nada
added an update
NESET presents a new analytical report on "Community Engagement in Higher Education: Trends, Practices and Policies", developed by our Network member Thomas Farnell.
While this report was drafted before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the current crisis arguably makes the topic of community engagement more important than ever.
The arguments presented in relation to the dimensions, good practices and benefits of community engagement will be highly relevant to policymakers and university leaders developing plans for the recovery and development of higher education in the post-crisis period.
Please follow the link below to access the full report in English. Executive summaries are also available in French and German.
 
Ramon Flecha
added a research item
Technology has become a crucial means for learning and education, and its use is widespread in most educational settings. This has brought forward major changes in approaches to learning and the learning environment. However, besides the advancement, there is a raising concern about the effects of its use on children. To respond to this concern, this report explores the effects of the use of digital technology in relation to children’s empathy and attention at school.
Hanna Siarova
added a research item
Linguistic diversity – including languages from outside Europe – is one of the great strengths of the European Union. To foster the potential of linguistic diversity to support multilingual competences and help overcome its possible challenges, innovative policies and practices in language teaching must be implemented across classrooms, schools, regions and countries. These novel language education practices need to overcome persisting language devaluation and isolation, deconstruct existing language hierarchies and apply an inclusive perspective of all languages both in education and in society. In this context, the main purpose of this report is to explore emerging innovative approaches and strategies of language teaching in Europe supporting learners’ plurilingualism, inspire educators and policy makers to innovate and implement forward-looking policies and practices in language education, and contribute to the implementation of the EU Council Recommendation on a comprehensive approach to the teaching and learning of languages (adopted in May 2019).
Cosmin Nada
added an update
NESET has recently published an analytical report on equity funding (also called needs-based funding, educational priority funding or compensation funding). The report, prepared by Sukriti Verelst, Hanne Bakelants, Lief Vandevoort and NESET member Ides Nicaise examines to what extent the improved governance of equity funding schemes could contribute to better results. 
The deliverable is based on case studies of equity funding in seven selected member states (or regions) of the EU: Flanders, the Netherlands, France, England, Ireland, Finland and Slovakia.
 
Ankie Vandekerckhove
added a research item
While the benefits have been widely evidenced of high-quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) for young children, especially those from vulnerable groups, it is clear that efforts to improve the holistic development and well-being of children and families must involve a wide range of policies, services and actions. No single intervention, service or sector on its own can hope to achieve sustainable improvements. There is a growing recognition among researchers, policy makers and practitioners that policies and services need to become better integrated if they are to effectively address complex issues such as poverty and promote social inclusion. Only multi-dimensional, aligned and integrated responses and interventions in early years can address the complex and multi-faceted needs of all children and their families, especially those in vulnerable situations, such as families living in poverty, Roma families, or families in the contexts of migration or asylum. As a concept, integrated working covers a multitude of cooperative systems and models. It is context-specific: different models exist, starting from the specific needs of children and families, with different partners and/or sectors involved in distinct policy settings. Integrated working approaches are often seen as a continuum ranging from cooperation, through collaboration and coordination, to full integration, in which different services are united into a single organisation in order to enhance service delivery. A wide range of sectors and services can be involved in integrated working, depending upon the needs of children and their families. These include: early childhood education and care services; preventive health centres; preventive family support services; schools; out-of-school care; as well as services from the cultural sector (such as libraries, community centres). Integrated working can refer to specific types of integration (vertical integration, e.g. linking childcare to early education, with both being part of an integrated ECEC system); or it can go broader, linking ECEC provision to services in other sectors such as health or social services (horizontal integration). In this report, we consider integrated working to be a form of professional cooperation within a network or partnership, which provides a range of support services for families and children, accessible to all, in which families and children can participate and where parents are respected as first educators (Gordon et al., 2016). The main purpose of this report is to examine the added value provided by, and the prerequisites for, integrated working – as well as the crucial role played by ECEC services – in order to better serve all families, but especially vulnerable and disadvantaged children and families. Separate attention is devoted to Roma children and their families as one of the most vulnerable groups in Europe, often trapped in a vicious circle of poverty, exclusion and discrimination. The report is written for policy makers and professionals working in the field of early childhood education and care. It is guided by the following questions: What services or functions should be involved in integrated working, paying specific attention to the role that ECEC can play? What inspiring examples of integrated working already exist in Europe? What is the added value of integrated working (for children and families, for professionals, for policy makers) in general, and specifically for Roma? What are the prerequisites for integrated working in general, and specifically for integrated working aimed at addressing the needs of Roma? The report focuses on different groups of vulnerable children and families – and, in particular, on Roma. It is based on a literature review and six case studies illustrating different ways of integrated working in a variety of contexts. Specifically, the case studies look at the Early Years Children and Family Centre in Newry (the UK); bridging professionals in Ghent pre-schools (Belgium); the Sprungbrettangebote in Berlin, which links centres to childcare (Germany); Sure Start Children’s House in Porcsalma (Hungary); the municipal kindergarten network in Tundzha municipality (Bulgaria); and the ‘Ready Set Go!’ project (Romania). The evidence from the case studies (Part II) frames and supplements the more theoretical part of the report (Part I). It serves as a basis from which to discuss the added value of, and prerequisites for, integrated working (covered respectively in Parts III and IV), and feeds into the report’s policy recommendations.
Cosmin Nada
added an update
This report provides an overview of the social integration of Roma in Spain, and briefly reviews evidence on the progress made and some effective, related policies and approaches within the areas of employment, education, housing and health. It also includes brief sections on political representation, associationism and activism as part of the processes of social integration of Roma in Spain.
Authors: Silvia Carrasco & Gabriela Poblet
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
NESET recently published a new quarterly newsletter, available for all stakeholders. We provide a quick synopsis below; you are also invited to access the online version here: http://eepurl.com/dOatJL
You can subscribe to receive a quarterly digest of latest news from the Network community and beyond by clicking here: http://eepurl.com/dOatJL
Key developments
The edition of September 2019 covers the news about our website launch and an overview of recently published deliverables. If you have not had the chance to read them, visit our library or by clicking the hyperlinks. 
Market reforms in the Hungarian school system: impact of changes in the ownership structure‘ has been prepared by Péter Radó, while Dovydas Caturianas and Mantas Budraitis developed the ‘Assessment of the ongoing higher education reforms in Lithuania‘. The section also outlines the list of forthcoming analytical and ad hoc reports. 
You can find the online versions of these deliverables here: https://nesetweb.eu/en/reports/other-deliverables/
Invitations to events
The newsletter features several open calls to participate in events, conferences and workshops, courtesy of DG EAC, International Association for Intercultural Education (IAIE), DENISE and InGRID-2.
Updates from the Network community
We present the news and updates from our members, as well as European organisations and networks – European Sociological Association (ESA) and SIRIUS, a European Policy Network on the education of children and young people with a migrant background.
News from our Network include mentions of the Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (CHER) 32nd Annual Conference and the International Research Conference (IRC-2019), organised by IEA (International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement).
We also celebrate interesting research activities, namely, the new edition of the Hungarian Educational Research Journal (HERJ), Croatia adopting the National Plan for Enhancing the Social Dimension of Higher Education (2019–2021), and a brand new tool for tackling ‘fake news’ and disinformation with critical media literacy. We also share an announcement from the Eurochild network, which aims to discuss the prospect of a European Commissioner for Children.
Recommended readings
Finally, we look outside the scope of the Network and provide access to recent reports, covering topics such as migration, Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC), learners’ engagement, soft skill training and education as self-satisfaction and self-fulfillment.
The reports are prepared by UNESCO and LSE’s Centre of Economic Performance, as well as by fellow DG EAC knowledge providers – Eurydice and the Joint Research Centre (JRC).
Many thanks to everyone who contributed to the newsletter and took time to share the latest updates! Barry van Driel, Ides Nicaise, Pepka Boyadjieva, Tamás Kozma, Julian McDougall, Christian Christrup Kjeldsen, Tomas Farnell, Ramon Flecha and Hanna Siarova.
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
NESET (formerly NESET II), a network of European and international researchers prominent in the social dimension of education and training, has reached another milestone. The Network’s Final Report of 2018 has been officially confirmed by the European Commission, which officially closes a four-year contract.
During the past year the Network has produced the following analytical reports:
1.  ‘The role and place of ECEC in integrated working, benefiting vulnerable groups such as Roma’ by Ankie Vandekerckhove, Hester Hulpia, Jana Huttova, Jan Peeters, Danut Dumitru, Claudiu Ivan, Szilvia Rezmuves, Eugenia Volen and Alina Makarevičienė
2. ‘Teaching media literacy in Europe: evidence of effective school practices in primary and secondary education’ by Julian McDougall, Marketa Zezulkova, Barry van Driel, Dalibor Sternadel.
NESET experts also answered an ad hoc question from the Commission:
1.  ‘The links between education and active citizenship/civic engagement’ by Irina Golubeva
All analytical and ad hoc responses produced throughout the project period can be accessed here: http://nesetweb.eu/en/activities.
As per usual, the highlight of the year was the thought-provoking annual conference, titled ‘Strengthening Common European Values through Education. What does the Evidence tell us?’. The event was co-organised by NESET, EENEE and Directorate General for Education and Culture (DG EAC), and held on November 22, in Brussels.
The conference proceedings are available on the Network’s website: http://nesetweb.eu/en/.
We are grateful to all Network Members that have helped the Network reach new milestones and contributed to the improvement of European-level policy development!
NESET will continue to be coordinated by PPMI for the four upcoming years.
If you would like to be kept up to date with recent analytical deliverables and evidence from the most relevant research, subscribe to quarterly newsletters by pressing this link: http://eepurl.com/b0j4mr.
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
The report aims to shed light on the prerequisites for integrated working, and the added value it provides, as well as the crucial role played by ECEC (Early childhood education and care) services. Although the majority of this report focuses specifically on vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, it also underlines the fact that integrated working provides added value for all families. As one of the most vulnerable groups in Europe, separate attention is devoted to Roma children and their families, who are often trapped in a vicious circle of poverty, exclusion and discrimination.
The report is based on a literature review and six case studies illustrating different ways of integrated working in a variety of contexts. Specifically, the case studies look at the Early Years Children and Family Centre in Newry (the UK); bridging professionals in Ghent pre-schools (Belgium); the Sprungbrettangebote in Berlin, which links refugee centres to childcare (Germany); Sure Start Children’s House in Porcsalma (Hungary); the municipal kindergarten network in Tundzha municipality (Bulgaria); and the ‘Ready Set Go!’ project (Romania).
The report is written for policy makers and professionals working in the field of early childhood education and care. It is guided by the following questions:
  • What services or functions should be involved in integrated working, paying specific attention to the role that ECEC can play?
  • What inspiring examples of integrated working already exist in Europe?
  • What is the added value of integrated working (for children and families, for professionals, for policy makers) in general, and specifically for Roma?
  • What are the prerequisites for integrated working in general, and specifically for integrated working aimed at addressing the needs of Roma?
The deliverable was prepared by Ankie Vandekerckhove , Hester Hulpia, Jana Huttova, Jan Peeters , Danut Dumitru, Claudiu Ivan, Szilvia Rezmuves, Eugenia Volen and Alina Makarevičienė.
 
Dalibor Sternadel
added a research item
The spread of disinformation and ‘fake news’ pose acute challenges for Member States’ education systems. Students (and indeed all citizens) need to develop pertinent competences to navigate these fast-changing environments. Research shows that education in media literacy can have positive outcomes on students’ knowledge, skills and attitudes in analysing and critically understanding the media and disinformation. Media literacy competences are required to actively participate in democratic society; they enable citizens to access, understand and deal with the media, and encourages them to become political agents. This report details the latest research in the area of media literacy and media education with regard to primary and secondary education in Europe. The report is aimed at policymakers, practitioners and researchers in the fields of school education, media and digital policies. It reviews relevant European and international research to better understand how teaching and learning practices can support students’ media literacy in primary and secondary education. It also aims to understand how media literacy education in schools can help address the challenges related to the spread of disinformation.
Irma Budginaite
added an update
If you missed out on the 3rd annual conference on “Strengthening Common European Values through Education. What does the Evidence tell us?”, organised by #NESET and #EENEE – you can find a short recap here: https://vimeo.com/304157927
Download conference materials and stay tuned for more: http://nesetweb.eu/en/activities/conference/
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
In less than 24 hours from now, we will be opening the 3rd annual NESET/EENEE conference “Strengthening Common European Values through Education. What does the Evidence tell us?“ in Brussels!
If you were unable to join us in person this year, you can watch the debate live by following this link: https://webcast.ec.europa.eu/conference-eenee-neset-strengthening-common-european-values-through-education-what-does-the-evidence-tell-us
In the meantime, take a look at last year's aftermovie! Proceedings and resources are available here: http://nesetweb.eu/en/activities/conference/
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
The two advisory networks of experts funded by the European Commission – #NESET II and #EENEE – are currently drafting the programme for the Conference “Strengthening Common European Values through Education. What does the Evidence tell us?“. The Annual Conference will take place on November 22, in Brussels. 
While more details are still under wraps, we can assure you that it will be a fertile ground for information exchange and discussion on common European values, active #citizenship and key competences. The list of speakers will include a number of renowned #education experts, and will be announced as we approach the date. In the meantime, we are very proud to introduce our key note speaker Professor Gert Biesta from the Brunel University London (UK) and University of Humanistic Studies (Netherlands).
If you are a researcher, policy maker, practitioner or other stakeholder in education and would like to participate in the Conference – please contact us at info.neset2[at]ppmi.lt! While the attendance is by invitation only, we are accepting inquiries and will allocate a limited number of seats to those who are interested.
 
Irina Golubeva
added a research item
Youth civic engagement and the role of education in developing active citizenship have become increasingly urgent topics of debate throughout the European Union. The growth of nationalist, radical and populist discourses and politics have revealed the need for a better understanding of what factors may encourage young people’s social participation and civic engagement. [...] This scoping report provides an overview of the link between education and active citizenship/civic engagement, and answers the following questions advanced by the EC: ▪ What does active citizenship entail? ▪ What are the different manifestations of active citizenship? ▪ To what extent is education a predictor of social participation and civic engagement? ▪ Is there a pattern between volunteering and education? ▪ What is the role of NGOs?
Irma Budginaite
added an update
Youth civic engagement and the role of education in developing active citizenship have become increasingly urgent topics of debate throughout the European Union. These debates are especially relevant in light of recent refugee crisis and growth of nationalist, radical and populist discourses in politics around the EU.
This report provides an overview of the link between education and active citizenship/civic engagement and answers the questions on what active citizenship entails; what are the different manifestations of active citizenship; to what extent is education a predictor of social participation and civic engagement; is there a pattern between volunteering and education; what is the role of NGOs. The report addresses each of these questions and aims to serve as a point for discussion on ways to modernize the European education policy landscape.
Author: Associate Prof. Irina Golubeva
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
This year the Network will deliver 2 Analytical Reports: Role and place of ECEC in integrated work, benefitting vulnerable groups, such as Roma, by Jana Huttova, Jan Peeters, Ankie Vandekerckhove and Hester Hulpia; and Teaching media literacy in the age of disinformation: effective school education policies and practices in Europe (working title), by Julian McDougall, Barry van Driel, Marketa Zulkova and Dalibor Sternadel.
NESET II is also ready to accommodate and respond to ad hoc queries from the Commission this year. One ad hoc question has been already answered and can be found in the NESET II website.
Additionally, NESET II together with EENEE will hold third annual conference in November, which will focus on European values and be a major event of the Network.
For more information, follow us online: http://nesetweb.eu/en/.
 
Irma Budginaite
added an update
The Network of Experts on the Social Dimension of Education and Training (NESET II) has released its quarterly newsletter! Find out more about the network‘s activities and recap of exciting events. We also proudly present 3 new analytical reports that add to an already impressive pool of resources. The full newsletter is available here: https://mailchi.mp/50365181bd9c/ezqgoor06t
 
Carmel Cefai
added a research item
This NESET research report is focused on how social and emotional education may be strengthened in core curricula across the EU. It includes a review of the most recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses of studies on the effectiveness of social and emotional education and proposes a multilevel framework on how it may be implemented in schools as a whole school approach. Other chapters are related to social and emotional competences, assessment, quality implementation, and case studies from EU countries. It concludes with a set of recommendations for policy makers and school leaders on how schools may strengthen the integration of social and emotional education as a core component of curricula across the EU. The report has been cited in the recent European Commission Proposal for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION on Key Competences for Lifelong Learning (January 2018). It may be accessed at http://nesetweb.eu/en/network-publishes-report-on-strengthening-social-and-emotional-education-as-a-core-curricular-area-across-the-eu/
Carmel Cefai
added an update
The Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training (NESET II) at the European Commission has just published a research report on Strengthening Social and Emotional Education as a Core Curriculum Area across the EU. The report is written by Carmel Cefai, Paul Bartolo, Valeria Cavioni and Paul Downes. It includes a meta-analysis of the most recent reviews of studies on the effectiveness of social and emotional education and proposes a multilevel framework on how it may be implemented in schools as a whole school approach. It concludes with a set of recommendations for policy makers and school leaders on how schools may strengthen the integration of social and emotional education as a core component of curricula across the EU. The report has been cited in the recent European Commission Proposal for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION on Key Competences for Lifelong Learning (January 2018).
 
Arianna Lazzari
added a research item
This report provides an overview of the status of early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality frameworks — or equivalent strategic policy documents — that govern ECEC quality at national, regional or local level in EU Member States. The review was commissioned by the Directorate General for Education and Culture (DG EAC) as an ad hoc question for the Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training (NESET II). http://nesetweb.eu/wp-content/uploads/AHQ4.pdf https://www.schooleducationgateway.eu/en/pub/viewpoints/experts/improving-the-quality-of-ecec.htm
Barry van Driel
added a research item
Growing ethnic and religious diversity1 in Europe poses both opportunities and challenges to Europe- an policy-makers and societies as a whole. It is expected that this diversity will continue to increase. At the same time, recent studies show that intolerance and social exclusion are increasing, with some mi- grant groups feeling alienated. This is leading to incidences of social tensions and unrest. Education has a key role to play in preparing societies for dealing with these phenomena. It also plays a vital role in the political socialisation of European citizens from cradle to grave. This independent report reviews the most relevant European and international research on these is- sues in order to summarise existing knowledge and to distil policy lessons based on evidence. It ad- dresses questions that include: What main opportunities and challenges do European education systems face in terms of educating for tolerance, respect for diversity and active citizenship? For each of these, what policy insights can we draw from existing European and international re- search and evidence? Which specific education policies and practices appear to work best and under which specific cir- cumstances?
Carmel Cefai
added an update
This technical report by NESET II is authored by Paul Downes and Carmel Cefai and published by the Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg in 2016.
School bullying concerns all EU member states. It is an affront to the common values of freedom, tolerance and non-discrimination. Its effects are serious and may be long-term. It is not only a problem for education policy to address. It is also a health and welfare issue relevant to child protection. School bullying can affect the mental and physical health as well as the academic performance of children and young people and may lead to early school leaving. In many cases, bullying leads victims to suicide or attempted suicide, anxiety, depression and self-harm. Being a perpetrator of bullying is associated with later violent behaviour and anti-social personality disorder.
The aim of this report is to inform policy-makers and practitioners at EU, national, regional and local level on the most effective strategies and practices for preventing bullying and violence in schools across the EU. It examines evidence from European and international research, reviews national practices and the work civil society organisations with regard to school bullying and violence.
 
Hanna Siarova
added 3 research items
While the implementation of the key competence framework has been on the agenda of all Member States, policies and practices for the assessment of these competences have yet to be fully implemented in EU countries’ efforts to integrate competence-based education into school curricula. Assessing key competences and transversal skills is a challenging task, as they refer to complex constructs that are not easily measurable. Although assessment policies that support the assessment of traditional key competences such as maths, languages and science have largely been implemented, they are often limited to the contexts provided by the subject matters with which they are most closely associated, and rarely assess related attitudes. Cross-curricular competences and transversal skills are harder to associate with individual subjects and to reflect in specific learning outcomes. An innovative approach to assessment practices is needed to grasp the complexity and multiple roles of modern learning. This report reviews international research to demonstrate how European education systems can improve their assessment practices to measure and support students’ acquisition of key competences and transversal skills.
While multilingualism and diversity have always been an integral part of Europe, they have also become important characteristics of many national education systems during the past two decades. The linguistic diversity of modern classrooms is shaped by 1) the presence of historical non-dominant language groups, which are being revitalised; 2) The growing mobility between countries which results in a variety of new languages and skills in the classrooms; and 3) changing educational and labour market demands that fa-vour multilingual and multi-literate citizens. The task of education stakeholders is to create school systems that bridge these various linguistic and cultural realities and support the mobility of the pupils across Europe. In light of the above, this report reviews international research to reveal how national education systems can better support multilingualism in their schools.
Irma Budginaite
added 2 research items
Education policy needs to cater for diversity and enable all citizens to succeed in education and to develop their full potential according to their specific needs and irrespective of their backgrounds. However, in reality, educational inequalities are a key challenge to education systems across the EU, often linked to socioeconomic disadvantage, low participation rates in early childhood education, low parental educational level and family support, ethnic or migrant background amongst others. This report highlights concrete policies and practices that work to disrupt or prevent educational disadvantage. The Key Findings are based on a review of 20 research projects funded under the Sixth and Seventh EU Framework Programmes for Research and Development (FP6 and FP7). The review was commissioned by the Directorate General for Education and Culture (DG EAC) and carried out by the Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training (NESET II).
At the European level, the importance of a qualified workforce is acknowledged in the revised priorities for the strategic cooperation in the field of education and training (European Commission, 2015a); it identifies professionalisation of staff as one of the key issues for further work in ECEC. In many countries, part of the workforce is represented by low qualified ECEC assistants. In the CoRe study, assistants are defined as ‘invisible workers’, meaning that their presence is usually not taken into account in policy documents, and that they have far fewer possibilities of qualification and of professional development than core practitioners do. Data from the last Eurydice report shows that ECEC attendance among children under 3 is very low across Europe (European commission/EACEA/Eurydice/Eurostat, 2014). The same report underlines that for about 30 % of parents, the low quality of ECEC services represents a barrier to use them. Improving the competences of all staff (core practitioners and assistants) would improve the services’ quality, which would in turn attract parents to ECEC services. Investing in the professionalization of assistants represents a key element for ECEC quality improvement, especially since in a number of countries the share of assistants in the services is rapidly growing (see 2.1., Table 1). This growth needs to be accompanied by a strong investment in competent systems that value the contributions of all staff, and involve the whole workforce in continuous professional development. Otherwise, in response to budget constraints or if reforms are too hurried, assistants may be hired over their more qualified colleagues and this could lead to a “deprofessionalisation” of ECEC staff. Professionalisation of Childcare Assistants in ECEC Building on the findings of the CoRe study (Urban et al., 2011; Vandenbroeck et al., 2016), we review the profiles of ECEC assistants in 15 European countries1 and their professionalization opportunities. We then make recommendations on how to develop coherent pathways towards qualification and continuous professional development (CPD) for assistants. In addition, we present examples of successful pathways towards qualification and CPD in three selected European countries (Denmark, France, Slovenia).
Irma Budginaite
added a project goal
NESET is an advisory network of experts working on the social dimension of education and training, which provides reliable, independent and rigorous scientific support, country specific expertise, and advice to the European Commission in relation to the equity and social aspects of all types and levels of education and training.
For more information see: http://nesetweb.eu/en/