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Project log

Suzanna M Rose
added 2 research items
In this early stage innovation discussion we report on how we used Intersectionality to explore the climates of STEM departments in Florida International University (FIU) and how our understanding was used in developing FIU ADVANCE’s 5-step Bystander Leadership behavioral skills training program. The discussion will engage participants in considering how the intersection of gender, race, and national origins of transnational STEM men could prime them to have views regarding diversity and equity in their departments that are counter to U.S. norms. We also will explore the experience of U.S. women of color in transnational environments. Last, we will share one of the ways we engaged FIU faculty in thinking and experiencing intersectionality in our Bystander Leadership Program.
Suzanna M Rose
added a research item
Women continue to be underrepresented in the academic fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) relative to the proportion of doctoral degrees they earn (NSF, 2017). This also was the case in 2009 at Florida International University, where only 11% of the STEM tenure-line faculty were women. In this chapter, the rationale, implementation, and outcomes will be described for two strategic career development projects for STEM women faculty that were funded by the National Science Foundation, the Awareness, Commitment and Empowerment project (2011-2016) and the FIU ADVANCE Institutional Transformation project (2016-2021). Also described will be the role that social media and digital formats played in developing and sustaining a sense of community among women faculty, as well as for doing research and evaluation.
Suzanna M Rose
added a research item
The FIU PAID team achieved three important goals within its first year (2011-12): (1) a 12% increase in the number of tenure track women hired in science and engineering, including two minority women; (2) an increase in the number of minority men faculty; and, (3) an improvement in the hiring climate, with new hires reporting a greater level of satisfaction with the interview process than faculty hired during the previous year. In this poster, the outcomes and three interventions that appeared to most significantly influence these results will be described. The first effective intervention pertained to STRIDE committee workshops, which were evaluated as highly effective at making participants aware of: unconscious bias, specific strategies to recruit a more diverse pool of candidates, and more objective evaluation procedures. The second intervention was the use of “open searches,” including a novel interdisciplinary open search strategy in addition to the traditional discipline-based type of open searching. The third intervention included successfully negotiating several spousal hires. In addition, although the search process showed improvement, a number of the new women faculty reported problems in terms of getting timely structural support once they arrived. In Year 2, the team will focus on interventions aimed at addressing the concerns of new faculty.