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MyDesignProcess

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Project log

Stefan Morana
added a research item
The information systems (IS) field contains a rich body of knowledge on approaches, methods, and frameworks that supports researchers in conducting design science research (DSR). It also contains some consensus about the key elements of DSR projects—such as problem identification, design, implementation, evaluation, and abstraction of design knowledge. Still, we lack any commonly accepted tools that address the needs of DSR scholars who seek to structure, manage, and present their projects. Indeed, DSR endeavors, which are often complex and multi-faceted in nature and involve various stakeholders (e.g., researchers, developers, practitioners, and others), require the support that such tools provide. Thus, to investigate the tools that DSR scholars actually need to effectively and efficiently perform their work, we conducted an open workshop with DSR scholars at the 2017 DESRIST conference in Karlsruhe, Germany, to debate 1) the general requirement categories of DSR tool support and 2) the more specific requirements. This paper reports on the results from this workshop. Specifically, we identify nine categories of requirements that fall into the three broad phases (pre-design, design, and post design) and that contribute to a software ecosystem for supporting DSR endeavors.
Stefan Morana
added a research item
Like all research projects, researchers should carefully plan and manage design projects to ensure valid and meaningful research outcomes. In this paper, we present the Design Canvas concept implemented in the MyDesignProcess. com platform. The Design Canvas captures the most important dimensions of a design project and displays them at a glance. In this paper, we describe the Design Canvas implementation in MyDesignProcess.com and illustrate with two exemplary design science research projects documented retrospectively its usage. Thereby, we illustrate how the Design Canvas can improve the structuring and communication of design projects.
Peter Fettke
added a research item
The analysis of manufacturing processes through process mining requires meaningful log data. Regarding worker activities, this data is either sparse or costly to gather. The primary objective of this paper is the implementation and evaluation of a system that detects, monitors and logs such worker activities and generates meaningful event logs. The system is light-weight regarding its setup and convenient for instrumenting assembly workstations in job shop manufacturing for temporary observations. In a study, twelve participants assembled two different product variants in a laboratory setting. The sensor events were compared to video annotations. The optical detection of grasping material by RGB cameras delivered a Median F-score of 0.83. The RGB+D depth camera delivered only a Median F-score of 0.56 due to occlusion. The implemented activity detection proofs the concept of process elicitation and prepares process mining. In future studies we will optimize the sensor setting and focus on anomaly detection.
Peter Fettke
added a research item
Design Science Research (DSR) is now an accepted research paradigm in the Information Systems (IS) field, aiming at developing purposeful IT artifacts and knowledge about the design of IT artifacts. A rich body of knowledge on approaches, methods, and frameworks supports researchers in conducting DSR projects. While methodological guidance is abundant, there is little support and guidance for documenting and effectively managing DSR processes. In this article, we present a set of design principles for tool support for DSR processes along with a prototypical implementation (MyDesignProcess.com). We argue that tool support for DSR should enable researchers and teams of researchers to structure, document, maintain, and present DSR, including the resulting design knowledge and artifacts. Such tool support can increase traceability, collaboration, and quality in DSR. We illustrate the use of our prototypical implementation by applying it to published cases, and we suggest guidelines for using tools to effectively manage design-oriented research.