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Goal: I am the sole author of these articles. I don't know what the goal is other than to write stuff.

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9

Project log

Carlton Clark
added a research item
Purpose This paper aims to contribute to the sociological literature on moral communication and disciplinary apparatuses in a functionally differentiated society. It combines Luhmannian and Foucauldian theories to further the understanding of social system complexity. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws on the work of Niklas Luhmann, Michel Foucault and others to explore resonance capability, disciplinary apparatuses and the complexity–sustainability trade-off. The argument is illustrated with a discussion of the late-nineteenth- to early-twentieth-century anti-child labor movement. Findings The paper argues that organizations are better equipped than function systems to draw moral distinctions. Given the amorality of the function systems and the increasing secularization of modern society, a great deal of moral communication now occurs in non-religious organizations. These social systems increase their complexity in response to new problems, but the increased system complexity may become unsustainable. Research limitations/implications The paper contributes to the growing sociological literature that compares and sometimes attempts to synthesize the theories of Luhmann and Foucault. It also contributes to the literature on organizational theory. Originality/value The paper brings together the work of Luhmann, Foucault, Valentinov and others to advance the understanding of organizations and moral communication in a functionally differentiated society. It uses Google Books Ngrams, among other resources, to support the argument.
Carlton Clark
added 3 research items
This article contributes to the sociological literature on moral communication and disciplinary apparatuses in a functionally differentiated society. Given the amorality of the function systems (economy, law, politics, etc.) and the increasing secularization of modern society, a great deal of moral communication now occurs in non-religious organizations, both nonprofit and profitmaking. At the same time, social problems tend to take on lives of their own—or become autopoietic—and resist being solved by organizations. In response, organizations increase their sophistication/complexity. During the same historical period (since the late eighteenth century), disciplinary apparatuses have arisen to solve problems of disorder and inefficiency, and they have gained increasing sophistication; however, operationally closed systems may ignore or resist disciplinary efforts from outside. In response, the disciplinary apparatuses enhance their own complexity. In both cases, the increasing complexity may become unsustainable. These theoretical concerns are illustrated with an extended discussion of the Progressive Era anti-child labor movement. NOTE: THERE ARE PROOFING ERRORS IN THIS VERSION.
This article draws on Luhmannian and Foucauldian social theories to analyze the decline of the nobility/commoner distinction. Evidence from seventeenth-and eighteenth-century tracts, treatises, letters, novels, and other sources suggests that the distinction between the nobility and the commoner lost currency as functional differentiation overruled social stratification in the second half of the eighteenth century. But to preserve a sense of difference, defenders of the nobility/commoner distinction adopted a true nobility/pretended nobility distinction, according to which the hereditary nobility possessed noble qualities by nature while the rising commoners could acquire only false nobility. Functional differentiation was met with a counter-movement that attempted to establish a tighter, grid-like social order in place of the looser medieval social order. Finally, the complexity-sustainability trade-off principle helps to explain why the hereditary nobility might have ignored the seemingly clear evidence of an impending threat to their privileged status.
Carlton Clark
added a project goal
I am the sole author of these articles. I don't know what the goal is other than to write stuff.