Project

Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) & the Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Lab (BeMoBIL)

Goal: Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) is a recently developed a method that allows for simultaneous recording of brain and body dynamics of humans actively behaving in and interacting with their environment. A mobile imaging approach is needed to study cognitive processes that are inherently based on the use of human physical structure to obtain behavioral goals.

The Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Lab investigates the brain dynamics underlying and interacting with cognitive and behavioral dynamics in a range of research projects. Here we investigate the brain dynamics in humans actively exploring space (BMBF and DFG projects), the neural dynamics of physical interaction with dynamic objects in 3D space and the impact of architectural space on human perception and emotion.

Date: 1 September 2016

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Klaus Gramann
added an update
then look at the new paper from Marius Klug with Timo Berg and me looking into the impact of time domain cleaning on the decomposition quality of AMICA.
Surprising results (again) showing that AMICA's incorporated log-lieklyhood removal algorithm does a fantastic job! Meaning, when decomposing only your experimental data after removing time periods during breaks, preparation etc., using AMMICA internal rejection most likely will give you very good quality of the decomposition regarding number of (automatically classified) brain and non-brain ICs, the remaining mutual information between ICs, and their scalp maps's residual variance.
Overall, these results indicate that you might save some time in data preprocessing...
the results were not necessarily expected.
Looking forward to receiving feedback on this and hope AMICA user's can share their experience with this approach here.
 
Julian Elias Reiser
added a research item
Blinking is a natural user-induced response which paces visual information processing. This study investigates whether blinks are viable for segmenting continuous electroencephalog-raphy (EEG) activity, for inferring cognitive demands in ecologically valid work environments. We report the blink-related EEG measures of participants who performed auditory tasks either standing , walking on grass, or whilst completing an obstacle course. Blink-related EEG activity discriminated between different levels of cognitive demand during walking. Both behavioral parameters (e.g., blink duration or head motion) and blink-related EEG activity varied with walking conditions. Larger occipital N1 was observed during walking, relative to standing and traversing an obstacle course, which reflects differences in bottom-up visual perception. In contrast, the amplitudes of top-down components (N2, P3) significantly decreased with increasing walking demands, which reflected narrowing attention. This is consistent with blink-related EEG, specifically in Theta and Alpha power that, respectively, increased and decreased with increasing demands of the walking task. This work presents a novel and robust analytical approach to evaluate the cognitive demands experienced in natural work settings, which precludes the use of artificial task manipulations for data segmentation.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
There is an amazing opportunity to work on a postdoc project together with @ChristophPloner and Carsten Finke at Charite University hospital in the CRC 1315 project “Spatial Memory Consolidation Networks”.
The CRC 1315 “Memory Consolidation” brings together outstanding memory researchers from Berlin institutions, including Charité, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin and Technische Universität Berlin. The successful applicant will become a member of the Brain & Behavior Group at the Dept. of Neurology at Charité Berlin and will be embedded in an interdisciplinary network of basic and clinical neuroscience researchers. There will be continuous exchanges with Postdocs, PhD students and Faculty of the CRC and associated institutions, including the Excellence Cluster NeuroCure, the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience and the Berlin School of Mind and Brain.
The project combines electrophysiological, pharmacological, imaging and lesion approaches in human patients and normal human subjects with behavioral/virtual reality paradigms to study contextual modulation of spatial memory consolidation. Please see the attached project summary and graphical abstract for more details.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
And here comes the last announcement for the marvelous 4th International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego, June 7-10.
The BeMoBIL group (with Sein Jeung Anna Wunderlich Marius Klug Lukas Gehrke and me) arrived in San Diego after the most horrific trip ever (might have to get used to traveling again...), starting with the evacuation of the entire terminal at Berlin airport (unknown alarm) at 9 AM Berlin local time, followed by running to catch the connecting flight to LA in Frankfurt (we barely made it, still don't know whether our luggage made it), to then having to go through border control at LAX for about 60 minutes, missing our connecting flight to San Diego and our luggage to then catch the last flight to San Diego at 10:35 PM, landing in San Diego at 11:15 PM to wait for our luggage that did not arrive.
But hey, finally reached our condo around 2:30 AM. Swell - took us only 28 hours (can't do the math at the moment due to severe sleep deprivation-related cognitive decline).
So, here we go - preview of the last day (June 10th) of the MoBI Conference in San Diego: We start with an excellent session on MoBI in Music/Dance/Arts (chair John R Iversen) looking into the role of the motor system in rhythm perception, followed by @AkankshaAcharya on Inter-Brain Synchrony in a Creative Writing Workshop and Private Profile on Brain-Body Music Interfaces for Creativity, Education, and Well-Being, followed by @DobriDotov on Collective dynamics support group drumming, reduce variability, and stabilize tempo drift and the session will be closed by
@PhoebeChen on Implementing interpersonal synchrony biofeedback in real-world social and artistic contexts.
The second morning session will be chaired by the marvelous Juliet King with talks on MoBI in Arts & Therapy, introducing MoBI to advance Research in Neuroscience, Arts & Related Therapeutics. Then, Rebecca Barnstaple will talk about a wonderful experiment "Moving Targets" giving insights into Embodiment and attention in a dance-based MoBI paradigm, followed by @SuzanneDikker
on Harmonic Dissonance: Interpersonal neurofeedback as a tool to foster art/science dialogue. Francisco J. Parada will close the session with the talk "MoBI meets MoBE: Towards translational neuroscience in the real-world".
This exiting session will be followed by pacific lunch time to proceed to the last keynote...
With Helen J Huang talking about 'Ground truth' motion artifacts and the influence of hair on EEG recordings - very important topics with great new methodological approaches.
And, if this was not enough yet, this year's #BrainProducts #MoBIAward winner Camila Sardeto Deolindo (not on Twitter?) will present her award-winning MoBI work. Congratulations again. Find out more about the MoBI Award here:
The conference will close with some reminiscing about MoBI and wonderful guests followed by the MoBI Moonshot to explore the future of #MoBI. Last, but absolutely not least, we will have a farewell party with an ocean view and lots of movement (maybe also some brain activity...)
Come join us:
There is still time to register (do not book the horrific flight experience)
#MoBI2022
 
Julian Elias Reiser
added a research item
Modern living and working environments are more and more interspersed with the concurrent execution of locomotion and sensory processing, most often in the visual domain. Many job profiles involve the presentation of visual information while walking, for example in warehouse logistics work, where a worker has to manage walking to the correct aisle to pick up a package while being presented with visual information over data-glasses concerning the next order. Similar use-cases can be found in manufacturing jobs, for example in car montage assembly lines where next steps are presented via augmented reality headsets while walking at a slow pace. Considering the overall scarcity of cognitive resources available to be deployed to either the cognitive or motor processes, task performance decrements were found when increasing load in either domain. Interestingly, the walking motion also had beneficial effects on peripheral contrast detection and the inhibition of visual stream information. Taking these findings into account, we conducted a study that comprised the detection of single visual targets (Landolt Cs) within a broad range of the visual field (-40° to +40° visual angle) while either standing, walking, or walking with concurrent perturbations. We used questionnaire (NASA-TLX), behavioral (response times and accuracy), and neurophysiological data (ERPs and ERSPs) to quantify the effects of cognitive-motor interference. The study was conducted in a Gait Real-time Analysis Interactive Laboratory (GRAIL), using a 180° projection screen and a swayable and tiltable dual-belt treadmill. Questionnaire and behavioral measures showed common patterns. We found increasing subjective physical workload and behavioral decrements with increasing stimulus eccentricity and motor complexity. Electrophysiological results also indicated decrements in stimulus processing with higher stimulus eccentricity and movement complexity (P3, Theta), but highlighted a beneficial role when walking without perturbations and processing more peripheral stimuli regarding earlier sensory components (N1pc/N2pc, N2). These findings suggest that walking without impediments can enhance the visual processing of peripheral information and therefore help with perceiving non-foveal sensory content. Also, our results could help with re-evaluating previous findings in the context of cognitive-motor interference, as increased motor complexity might not always impede cognitive processing and performance.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The 4h International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego is coming up soon.
We will meet in person in San Diego, June 7-10 (right after the @TwinBrainEU MoBI workshop San Diego).
IN PERSON! I mean, actually meeting real people in person
We will start with the opening reception on Tuesday, June 7 with a warm welcome at the beautiful
@SCCN at @UCSD in La Jolla.
If you would like to see the amazing #LuisKahn #SalkInstitute and enjoy work leading experts in mobile brain imaging - this is the place!
The first day of the #MoBI conference is already packed with excellent speakers and contributions to MoBI hardware and software by Dave Hairston, Lukas Gehrke, and Ying Wu.
This will be directly followed by new analyses and standardization approaches to MoBI data and M/EEG data in general with contributions from Arno Delorme, Dung Truong, Marius Klug Marius Klug and Amanda Studnicki & Noelle Jacobsen.
This will be followed by the first keynote from Scott Makeig Scott Makeig on 'Mobile Brain/Body Imaging of Social, Affective, and Creative Agency'.
I am very much looking forward to the sessions and talk by Scott!
And then the opportunity to work with hardware from great companies providing excellent technologies for mobile brain imaging @BrainProducts @ANTNeuro Ana Jolic @MentalabExplore
@WearableSensing
Don't miss out to learn about the newest hardware developments.
Finally, the first days closes with a marvelous poster session with soooo many excellent posters this year! Discuss with your colleagues, find new solutions to old problems, and enjoy beautiful La Jolla in the evening by going out with your best colleagues and scientists.
See you there!
Ah right, you can still register for the workshop and the conference:
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
We still have open slots for the upcoming MoBI data analyses workshop preceding the 4th International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego this June.
Are you interested in synchronization and analyses of multimodal data?
Didn't you always want to leave the lab and record EEG in the wild?
Want to get free analyses tools and insights from leading MoBI researchers on how to analyses the mess you record outside the lab?
Then come join us from June 5-7, 2022 at the beautiful Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience at UCSD where MoBI started in the late 2000nds.
We have experts talking about #LabStreaminLayer (@FiorenzoArtoni ), Sein Jeung giving you an introduction to BIDS formatting of EEG plus motion data, and Marius Klug Anna Wunderlich @LukasGehrke and @KlausGramann (that is me while RG won't allow self-referencing...) from the Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Labs #BeMoBIL who developed and extensively tested the BeMoBIL analyses pipeline (https://github.com/BeMoBIL/bemobil-pipeline) plus Martin Seeber talking about gait and EEG analyses.
For the program please visit here:
Don't miss out and work with us hands-on on MoBI data and go to the beach afterward.
Registration here:
See you in San Diego
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
We are looking forward to 3 fantastic keynotes at the upcoming 4th International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego, June 7-10.
will address important MoBI topics.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Here is a new methodological perspective from our group headed by Sheng Wang together with Zakaria Djebbara and Guilherme Sanches de Oliveira .
We describe Ecological Psychology and MoBI as an important theoretical and practical framework to investigate the impact of built environments human cognition and behavior.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Are you interested in mobile brain imaging #MoBI experiments and how to synchronize and analyze multimodal data?
Join for the 2nd #MoBI workshop supported by the #EUHorizon2020 program. Fabulous speakers will be there, including Martin Seeber Anna Wunderlich Sein Jeung Marius Klug Uros Marusic and more...
Registration is still open and we have a few slots left: https://sites.google.com/ucsd.edu/mobi2022/registration-submission?authuser=0
The workshop will provide example data and scripts with tons of hands-on analyses introducing the #BeMoBIL analyses pipeline.
You will also have time to play around with mobile brain imaging hardware from
@Brain_Products @ANTNeuro @mBrainTrain @MentalabExplore @WearableSensing
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The 2022 BrainProduct MoBI Award (https://mobi-award.com/) winners are here! We had a great number of very impressive MoBI studies published in excellent journals. The MoBI community is growing fast and we will hopefully see all winners at the upcoming MoBI conference in San Diego in June!
Congrats Camila Deolindo, Natalie Richer and my team has achieved the third winning place! Thanks to Marius Klug Lukas Gehrke and most of all to Private Profile who was pivotal to develop analyses approaches for this data set.
The first prize goes to Camila Sardeto Deolindo, University of Aarhus (Denmark) for her paper on microstates in complex and dynamic environments.
The second price goes to the impressive work of Natalie Richer for her work on motion artifact removal using new dual layer electrodes - super cool work together with Daniel Ferris and others.
And the third price goes to our team for our recent paper on human cortical dynamics underlying heading computation during active physical rotation as compared to visual flow only. A very important paper to me which has been 5 years in the making...
Don't forget to submit your MoBI publications for the next round of the MoBI award
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
In the next days, we will open regular submissions for the upcoming 4th International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego, at the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, where it all began...
Take your chance to sign up with early bird option for the conference (June 7-10) and the MoBI workshop (June 5-7).
We will have a fantastic program with keynotes from Helen J Huang , Eduardo Macagno together with Scott Makeig as well as a wide range of MoBI topics from mobile EEG-hardware to software, gait and clinical gait investigated with MoBI, neuroscience and architecture as well as spatial cognition and therapeutic intervention.
Looking forward to meeting you in person at the beach in San Deigo!
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Registration is now open for the 4th International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego from June 7 – 10, 2022.
Join us in person at the beautifully located SCCN – the birthplace of MoBI and enjoy exciting research in mobile brain imaging from basics to application.
Plus the second MoBI workshop will take place from June 5 to 7, 2022 with ample time to play with different mobile brain imaging hardware and an extensive introduction to analyses of MoBI data. Supported by the EU Horizon 2020.
#BeMoBIL #MoBI #mobileEEG
 
Marius Klug
added a research item
Removing power line noise and other frequency-specific artifacts from electrophysiological data without affecting neural signals remains a challenging task. Recently, an approach was introduced that combines spectral and spatial filtering to effectively remove line noise: Zapline. This algorithm, however, requires manual selection of the noise frequency and the number of spatial components to remove during spatial filtering. Moreover, it assumes that noise frequency and spatial topography are stable over time, which is often not warranted. To overcome these issues, we introduce Zapline-plus, which allows adaptive and automatic removal of frequency-specific noise artifacts from M/electroencephalography (EEG) and LFP data. To achieve this, our extension first segments the data into periods (chunks) in which the noise is spatially stable. Then, for each chunk, it searches for peaks in the power spectrum, and finally applies Zapline. The exact noise frequency around the found target frequency is also determined separately for every chunk to allow fluctuations of the peak noise frequency over time. The number of to-be-removed components by Zapline is automatically determined using an outlier detection algorithm. Finally, the frequency spectrum after cleaning is analyzed for suboptimal cleaning, and parameters are adapted accordingly if necessary before re-running the process. The software creates a detailed plot for monitoring the cleaning. We highlight the efficacy of the different features of our algorithm by applying it to four openly available data sets, two EEG sets containing both stationary and mobile task conditions, and two magnetoencephalography sets containing strong line noise.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Last chance to submit your work to the upcoming Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Conference in San Diego!
This will be an exciting meeting with tons of amazing new mobile EEG and MOBI studies plus a MoBI workshop before the conference!
#MoBI #mobileEEG
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Due to popular request, we have extended the MoBI Conference abstract submission deadline until March 15, 2022.
Submit your MoBI work and mingle up with leading experts in the field in San Diego, June 7 - 8, 2022!
#MoBI #mobileEEG #MoBI2022 #MoBIAward
 
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
Electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invasive technique used to record cortical neurons' electrical activity using electrodes placed on the scalp. It has become a promising avenue for research beyond state-of-the-art EEG research that is conducted under static conditions. EEG signals are always contaminated by artifacts and other physiological signals. Artifact contamination increases with the intensity of movement. In the last decade (since 2010), researchers have started to implement EEG measurements in dynamic setups to increase the overall ecological validity of the studies. Many different methods are used to remove non-brain activity from the EEG signal, and there are no clear guidelines on which method should be used in dynamic setups and for specific movement intensities. Currently, the most common methods for removing artifacts in movement studies are methods based on independent component analysis (ICA). However, the choice of method for artifact removal depends on the type and intensity of movement, which affects the characteristics of the artifacts and the EEG parameters of interest. When dealing with EEG under non-static conditions, special care must be taken already in the designing period of an experiment. Software and hardware solutions must be combined to achieve sufficient removal of unwanted signals from EEG measurements. We have provided recommendations for the use of each method depending on the intensity of the movement and highlighted the advantages and disadvantages of the methods. However, due to the current gap in the literature, further development and evaluation of methods for artifact removal in EEG data during locomotion is needed.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Submit your MoBI research paper!
The Brain Products MoBI Award rewards outstanding research in the field of Mobile Brain/Body Imaging and will be presented for the 4th time in 2022.
Submissions are still open and will be accepted until February 20, 2022.
More info here:
The winner will present his/her work at the upcoming MoBI conference in San Diego!
 
Teodoro Solis-Escalante
added a research item
Advances in Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) technology allows for real-time measurements of human brain dynamics during every day, natural, real-life situations. This special issue Time to Move brings together a collection of experimental papers, targeted reviews and opinion articles that lay out the latest MoBI findings. A wide range of topics across different fields are covered including art, athletics, virtual reality, and mobility. What unites these diverse topics is the common goal to enhance and restore human abilities by reaching a better understanding on how cognition is implemented by the brain-body relationship. The breadth and novelty of paradigms and findings reported here positions MoBI as a new frontier in the field of human cognitive neuroscience.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The Brain Products MoBI Award 2022 is now open for submissions!
Taking place during the 2022 MoBI Conference in San Diego, the award will be given to outstanding research in the field of Mobile Brain/Body Imaging.
Submit your MoBI publication and win great EEG hardware:
https://mobi-award.com/submissions22/ looking forward to your submissions!
Looking forward to you submission.
 
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
A sedentary lifestyle in nursing home residents is often accompanied with reduced life space mobility and in turn affects satisfaction with life. One of the reasons for this may be limited ability to find one’s way around the care facility and its environment. However, spatial orientation exercises might reduce these problems if they are integrated into an adequate cognitive-motor training. Therefore, we integrated six novel and target group-specific spatial orientation exercises into an established multicomponent cognitive-motor group training for nursing home residents and evaluated its feasibility. Forty nursing home residents (mean age: 87.3 ± 7 years) participated in the spatial orientation cognitive motor training (45–60 min, twice a week over a period of 12 weeks). The main outcomes included the feasibility criteria (adherence, completion time, acceptance, instructions, motor performance, materials/set up, complexity) and first measurements of mobility and satisfaction with life (SPPB [Short Physical Performance Battery], SWLS [Satisfaction with Life Scale]). Adherence increased over time. The increase was associated with the adaptions and modifications of the spatial orientation exercises that were made to meet the participants’ requirements. A positive trend was discerned for mobility and life satisfaction, comparing pre- and posttraining data. In summary, the feasibility analysis revealed that future interventions should consider that (a) instructions of demanding spatial tasks should be accompanied by an example task, (b) trainers should be encouraged to adjust task complexity and materials on an individual basis, (c) acceptance of the training should be promoted among nursing staff, and (d) surroundings with as little disturbance as possible should be selected for training.
Hasan Ayaz
added a research item
Until recently, neural assessments of gross motor coordination could not reliably handle active tasks, particularly in realistic environments, and offered a narrow understanding of motor-cognition. By applying a comprehensive neuroergonomic approach using optical mobile neuroimaging, we demonstrated the broader capability for ecologically relevant neural evaluations for the “difficult-to-diagnose” Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), a motor-learning deficit affecting 5-6% of children with lifelong complications. We confirmed that DCD is not an intellectual, but a motor-cognitive disability, as gross motor /complex tasks revealed neuro-hemodynamic deficits and dysfunction within the right middle and superior frontal gyri of the Prefrontal Cortex. Furthermore, by incorporating behavioral performance, aberrant patterns of neural efficiency in these regions were revealed in DCD children, specifically during motor tasks. Lastly, we provide a framework, evaluating disorder impact in real-world contexts to identify those for whom interventional approaches are most needed and open the door for precision therapies.
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
The retrosplenial complex (RSC) plays a crucial role in spatial orientation by computing heading direction and translating between distinct spatial reference frames based on multi-sensory information. While invasive studies allow investigating heading computation in moving animals, established non-invasive analyses of human brain dynamics are restricted to stationary setups. To investigate the role of the RSC in heading computation of actively moving humans, we used a Mobile Brain/Body Imaging approach synchronizing electroencephalography with motion capture and virtual reality. Data from physically rotating participants were contrasted with rotations based only on visual flow. During physical rotation, varying rotation velocities were accompanied by pronounced wide frequency band synchronization in RSC, the parietal and occipital cortices. In contrast, the visual flow rotation condition was associated with pronounced alpha band desynchronization, replicating previous findings in desktop navigation studies, and notably absent during physical rotation. These results suggest an involvement of the human RSC in heading computation based on visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive input and implicate revisiting traditional findings of alpha desynchronization in areas of the navigation network during spatial orientation in movement-restricted participants.
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
The parallel execution of two motor tasks can lead to performance decrements in either one or both of the tasks. Age-related declines can further magnify the underlying competition for cognitive resources. However, little is known about the neural dynamics underlying motor resource allocation during dual-task walking. To better understand motor resource conflicts, this study investigated sensorimotor brain rhythms in younger and older adults using a dual-task protocol. Time-frequency data from two independent component motor clusters were extracted from electroencephalography data during sitting and walking with an additional task requiring manual responses. Button press-related desynchronization in the alpha and beta frequency range were analyzed for the impact of age (< 35 years, ≥ 70 years) and motor task (sitting, walking). Button press-related desynchronization in the beta band was more pronounced for older participants and both age groups demonstrated less pronounced desynchronizations in both frequency bands during walking compared to sitting. Older participants revealed less power modulations between sitting and walking, and less pronounced changes in beta and alpha suppression were associated with greater slowing in walking speed. Our results indicate age-specific allocations strategies during dual-task walking as well as interdependencies of concurrently performed motor tasks reflected in modulations of sensorimotor rhythms.
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
The repeated use of navigation assistance systems leads to decreased processing of the environment. Previous studies demonstrated that auditory references to landmarks in navigation instructions can improve incidental spatial knowledge acquisition when driving a single route through an unfamiliar virtual environment. Based on these results, three experiments were conducted to investigate the generalizability and ecological validity of incidental landmark and route knowledge acquisition induced by landmark-based navigation instructions. In the first experiment, spatial knowledge acquisition was tested after watching an interactive video showing the navigation of a real-world urban route. A second experiment investigated incidental spatial knowledge acquisition during assisted navigation when participants walked through the same real-world, urban environment. The third experiment tested the acquired spatial knowledge two weeks after participants had walked through the real-world environment. All experiments demonstrated better performance in a cued-recall task for participants navigating with landmark-based navigation instructions as compared to standard instructions. Different levels of information provided with landmark-based instructions impacted landmark recognition dependent on the delay between navigation and test. The results replicated an improved landmark and route knowledge when using landmark-based navigation instructions emphasizing that auditory landmark augmentation enhances incidental spatial knowledge acquisition, and that this enhancement can be generalized to real-life settings. This research is paving the way for navigation assistants that, instead of impairing spatial knowledge acquisition, incidentally foster the acquisition of landmark and route knowledge during every-day navigation.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
There are lot's of new videos from the MoBI Workshop 2021 now available online including hands-on sessions by Marius Klug, Anna Wunderlich Laurens Ruben Krol and Sein Jeung as well as Uros Marusic , Bettina Wollesen
as well as the keynote from day 2 by Daniel Ferris
Check out the BeMoBIL youtube channel for the hands-on sessions and talks:
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
I am happy to share all talks on Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) from the first day of our 1st MoBI workshop in Berlin from May 25 to May 27.
You will find all talks from day 1 with
Johanna Wagner on "Trial-by-Trial EEG Source Dynamics Predict the Speed of Gait Adaptation"
Martin Seeber on "Investigating gait-related brain dynamics by EEG source imaging"
Sarah Blum on "MoBI meets Android: Current Developments and Future Directions"
and @KlausGramann on "Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) What - Why - How?"
The playlist of the workshop can be found on YouTube:
where you will find, in the coming days/weeks also all the hands-on sessions.
So, get the data, get the scripts, and start some MoBI analyses working through the videos if you didn't have the time to join the workshop.
The data and scripts can be found here:
For the password please DM me (or via email: klaus.gramann@tu-berlin.de)
 
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
Spatial navigation is a complex cognitive process based on multiple senses that are integrated and processed by a wide network of brain areas. Previous studies have revealed the retrosplenial complex (RSC) to be modulated in a task-related manner during navigation. However, these studies restricted participants’ movement to stationary setups, which might have impacted heading computations due to the absence of vestibular and proprioceptive inputs. Here, we present evidence of human RSC theta oscillation (4–8 Hz) in an active spatial navigation task where participants actively ambulated from one location to several other points while the position of a landmark and the starting location were updated. The results revealed theta power in the RSC to be pronounced during heading changes but not during translational movements, indicating that physical rotations induce human RSC theta activity. This finding provides a potential evidence of head-direction computation in RSC in healthy humans during active spatial navigation.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Dear all spatial cognition interested,
We just uploaded the talk by John S Butler titled "Insights on Self Motion using Behavioral and EEG studies" on our BeMoBIL YouTube channel:
You will find a number of talks there, including great spatial cognition talks from Victor R Schinazi , Shachar Maidenbaum and Hugo J Spiers
and also talks about general and computational neuroscience talks from @MikeXCohen and @ThomasDonogh
Enjoy!
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The TwinBrain summer school in Piran (Slovenia) is approaching fast.
"Exploring the dynamics of the human brain in motion"
We will have a full week of multimethod investigations of the human brain during movement.
Interested students can send a motivation letter for on-site participation until 31st May.
The online registration will be open until the end of June.
More information on the TwinBrain websites
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The 1st International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Gathering will be held June 7th / 8th (Asia/Pacific), featuring a look at the past, present, and future of Mobile Brain-Body Imaging with talks by some of the founders of the field Scott Makeig @KlausGramann, and @TPJung as well as Keynotes from the postponed MoBI conference (now to be held in June 2022) and additional talks across the range of MoBI applications.
We will have live socializing, discussion with speakers, networking, and poster viewing on Gather.Town after the talks.
This virtual gathering will help us stay connected, filling the place of the originally scheduled in-person conference, which has been postponed to June 3-7, 2022.
Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) is a new imaging approach employing mobile brain imaging methods synchronized to body motion capture and other behavioral and psychophysiological data streams to investigate the brain dynamics accompanying natural cognitive and affective processes as humans interact with their environment and with others. It is a form of real-world neuroimaging.
FREE REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!
Register here for free: https://forms.gle/8tAXo1QJqyrcJ6ge7
(You will be able to indicate interest in virtually presenting a poster as well as joining a directory of MoBI researchers.)
**We hope to attract a truly global group of participants, especially those who would not ordinarily travel to the conference, so please spread the word widely.**
Sincerely,
John Iversen (UCSD), Klaus Gramann (TU Berlin) & Tzyy-Ping Jung (UCSD)
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
1st Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) Workshop
May, 25thto 27th 2021
TU Berlin / Online
IMPORTANT UPDATE:
After an attack on several of TU Berlin’s IT systems on Friday morning, 30 April 2021, the servers were shut down to prevent further damage. Several services including email communication and use of Cloud services are currently unavailable for use.
We are currently unable to provide information about the scope and duration of the current and any further restrictions We are currently working to establish a backup communication channel and data access solution for the workshop.
All interested in the workshop as well as all participants that already registered, please send an email to:
If you sent an email and did not get any response - please send it again!
We answer all inquiries.
Please share this so we can reach all who already registered and those interested in the workshop. Thanks!
Hope to see you soon,
The BeMoBIL team
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
In 4 weeks the 1st MoBI workshop will be live. Looking forward to talks from
plus hands-on sessions over two days going through the entire preprocessing of M/EEG MoBI data.
The event is free (supported by the EU Horizon program) and streamed online.
Hands-on sessions with the BeMoBIL pipeline by
and advanced Gait/EEG analyses with
as well as deconvolution of M/EEG data with the UNFOLD toolbox by
@olafdimigen and Benedikt Ehinger
All interested: please send an email to register to
You will get all information regarding software requirements and data to download etc. soon. Please RT to potential interested M/EEG researchers
 
Julian Elias Reiser
added a research item
Objective We demonstrate and discuss the use of mobile electroencephalogram (EEG) for neuroergonomics. Both technical state of the art as well as measures and cognitive concepts are systematically addressed. Background Modern work is increasingly characterized by information processing. Therefore, the examination of mental states, mental load, or cognitive processing during work is becoming increasingly important for ergonomics. Results Mobile EEG allows to measure mental states and processes under real live conditions. It can be used for various research questions in cognitive neuroergonomics. Besides measures in the frequency domain that have a long tradition in the investigation of mental fatigue, task load, and task engagement, new approaches—like blink-evoked potentials—render event-related analyses of the EEG possible also during unrestricted behavior. Conclusion Mobile EEG has become a valuable tool for evaluating mental states and mental processes on a highly objective level during work. The main advantage of this technique is that working environments don’t have to be changed while systematically measuring brain functions at work. Moreover, the workflow is unaffected by such neuroergonomic approaches.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
1stMobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) Workshop
May, 25th to 27th2021
TU Berlin / Online
The Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging labs (BeMoBIL) at @TUBerlin will host the first MoBI workshop from May 25th to May 27th supported by the EU Horizon 2020 program. The workshop will be streamed live allowing for interactions among participants and presenters. Further details and the workshop website will be launched in April.
May 25th: The workshop will start with a full day of background lectures on MoBI with a virtual lab tour of the Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Labs providing the opportunity to meet with researchers and to discuss specific MoBI research questions from hardware to theory.
Presenters will be Janna Protzak , Sarah Blum and Martin Seeber, and @KlausGramann with a keynote on Tuesday by Daniel Ferris
Then, two days of hands-on modules follow.
May 26th: Hands-on modules will cover the topics
  • “Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) for MoBI data”,
  • “Data synchronization with the Lab-Streaming-Layer (LSL)”,
  • „MoBI data import and preprocessing“,
  • “Multimodal event extraction and data preprocessing”, and
  • "Clustering of MoBI data“.
May 27th: Hands-on modules will cover the topics
  • “Deconvolution of MoBI data – the unfold toolbox”,
  • "Gait analyses – biomechanical aspects“, and
  • “Gait analyses – brain dynamics”.
We are very happy to have Benedikt Ehinger, @OlafDimigen, Martin Seeber, Bettina Wollesen, Uros Marusic, Sein Jeung, Marius Klug, Janna Protzak, and Anna Wunderlich to provide insights into the background and analyses approaches of the hands-on topics.
Looking forward to seeing you in May!
Interested in this workshop please send an email with your full name and affiliation to
 
Alexandre Delaux
added a research item
Coupling behavioral measures and brain imaging in naturalistic, ecological conditions is key to comprehend the neural bases of spatial navigation. This highly‐integrative function encompasses sensorimotor, cognitive, and executive processes that jointly mediate active exploration and spatial learning. However, most neuroimaging approaches in humans are based on static, motion constrained paradigms and they do not account for all these processes, in particular multisensory integration. Following the Mobile Brain/Body Imaging approach, we aimed to explore the cortical correlates of landmark‐based navigation in actively behaving young adults, solving a Y‐maze task in immersive virtual reality. EEG analysis identified a set of brain areas matching state‐of‐the‐art brain imaging literature of landmark‐based navigation. Spatial behavior in mobile conditions additionally involved sensorimotor areas related to motor execution and proprioception usually overlooked in static fMRI paradigms. Expectedly, we located a cortical source in or near the posterior cingulate, in line with the engagement of the retrosplenial complex in spatial reorientation. Consistent with its role in visuo‐spatial processing and coding, we observed an alpha power desynchronization while participants gathered visual information. We also hypothesized behavior‐dependent modulations of the cortical signal during navigation. Despite finding few differences between the encoding and retrieval phases of the task, we identified transient time‐frequency patterns attributed, for instance, to attentional demand, as reflected in the alpha/gamma range, or memory workload in the delta/theta range. We confirmed that combining mobile high‐density EEG and biometric measures can help unravel the brain structures and the neural modulations subtending ecological landmark‐based navigation.
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
Learning to navigate uncharted terrain is a key cognitive ability that emerges as a deeply embodied process, with eye movements and locomotion proving most useful to sample the environment. We studied healthy human participants during active spatial learning of room‐scale virtual reality (VR) mazes. In the invisible maze task participants wearing a wireless EEG headset were free to explore their surroundings, only given the objective to build and foster a mental spatial representation of their environment. Spatial uncertainty was resolved by touching otherwise invisible walls that were briefly rendered visible inside VR, similar to finding your way in the dark. We showcase the capabilities of Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) using Virtual Reality (VR), demonstrating several analyses approaches based on general linear models (GLM) to reveal behavior‐dependent brain dynamics. Confirming spatial learning via drawn sketch maps we employed motion capture to image spatial exploration behavior describing a shift from initial exploration to subsequent exploitation of the mental representation. Using independent component analyses, the current work specifically targeted oscillations in response to wall touches reflecting isolated spatial learning events arising in deep posterior EEG sources located to the retrosplenial complex. Single‐trial regression identified significant modulation of alpha oscillations by the immediate, egocentric, exploration behavior. When encountering novel walls, as well as with increasing walking distance between subsequent touches when encountering novel walls, alpha power decreased. We conclude a prominent role during egocentric evidencing of allocentric spatial hypotheses.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Labs at TU Berlin will host the first Mobile Brain/Body Imaging workshop this coming May.
Great speakers and 2 full days of hands-on sessions for data recording and analyses in MoBI studies.
Stay tuned for updates...
 
Zakaria Djebbara
added a research item
Action is a medium of collecting sensory information about the environment, which in turn is shaped by architectural affordances. Affordances characterize the fit between the physical structure of the body and capacities for movement and interaction with the environment, thus relying on sensorimotor processes associated with exploring the surroundings. Central to sensorimotor brain dynamics, the attentional mechanisms directing the gating function of sensory signals share neuronal resources with motor-related processes necessary to inferring the external causes of sensory signals. Such a predictive coding approach suggests that sensorimotor dynamics are sensitive to architectural affordances that support or suppress specific kinds of actions for an individual. However, how architectural affordances relate to the attentional mechanisms underlying the gating function for sensory signals remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that event-related desynchronization of alpha-band oscillations in parieto-occipital and medio-temporal regions covary with the architectural affordances. Source-level time-frequency analysis of data recorded in a motor-priming Mobile Brain/ Body Imaging experiment revealed strong event-related desynchronization of the alpha band to originate from the posterior cingulate complex, the parahippocampal region as well as the occipital cortex. Our results firstly contribute to the understanding of how the brain resolves architectural affordances relevant to behaviour. Second, our results indicate that the alpha-band originating from the occipital cortex and parahippocampal region covaries with the architectural affordances before participants interact with the environment, whereas during the interaction, the posterior cingulate cortex and motor areas dynamically reflect the affordable behaviour. We conclude that the sensorimotor dynamics reflect behaviour-relevant features in the designed environment.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
All interested in comp neuroscience and sensorimotor integration - this week we will host
@MikeXCohen at the BeMoBIL colloquial talks.
Mike has been contributing to the computational neuroscience community for years and provides great learning resources (https://mikexcohen.com).
In his talk, Mike X Cohen will present a systems neuroscience approach to sensorimotor integration. Join us on
Thu 4:15 CET
The Zoom link can be found on our home page
and the talk will be uploaded to our YouTube channel later
Looking forward to a great talk that will be very informative for the theoretical foundations of MoBI research.
 
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
Spatial navigation is one of the fundamental cognitive functions central to survival in most animals. Studies in humans investigating the neural foundations of spatial navigation traditionally use stationary, desk‐top protocols revealing the hippocampus, parahippocampal place area (PPA), and retrosplenial complex to be involved in navigation. However, brain dynamics while freely navigating the real world remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we developed a novel paradigm, the Audiomaze, in which participants freely explore a room‐sized virtual maze while EEG is recorded synchronized to motion capture. Participants (n=16) were blindfolded and explored different mazes, each in three successive trials, using their right hand as a probe to ‘feel’ for virtual maze walls. When their hand ‘neared’ a virtual wall, they received directional noise feedback. Evidence for spatial learning include shortening of time spent and an increase of movement velocity as the same maze was repeatedly explored. Theta‐band EEG power in or near the right lingual gyrus, the posterior portion of the PPA, decreased across trials, potentially reflecting the spatial learning. Effective connectivity analysis revealed directed information flow from the lingual gyrus to the midcingulate cortex, which may indicate an updating process that integrates spatial information with future action. To conclude, we found behavioral evidence of navigational learning in a sparse‐AR environment, and a neural correlate of navigational learning was found near lingual gyrus.
Alexandre Delaux
added a research item
Coupling behavioral measures and brain imaging in naturalistic, ecological conditions is key to comprehend the neural bases of spatial navigation. This highly-integrative function encompasses sensorimotor, cognitive, and executive processes that jointly mediate active exploration and spatial learning. However, most neuroimaging approaches in humans are based on static, motion constrained paradigms and they do not account for all these processes, in particular multisensory integration. Following the Mobile Brain/Body Imaging approach, we aimed to explore the cortical correlates of landmark-based navigation in actively behaving young adults, solving a Y-maze task in immersive virtual reality. EEG analysis identified a set of brain areas matching state-of-the-art brain imaging literature of landmark-based navigation. Spatial behavior in mobile conditions additionally involved sensorimotor areas related to motor execution and proprioception usually overlooked in static fMRI paradigms. Expectedly, we located a cortical source in or near the posterior cingulate, in line with the engagement of the retrosplenial complex in spatial reorientation. Consistent with its role in visuo-spatial processing and coding, we observed an alpha power desynchronization while participants gathered visual information. We also hypothesized behavior-dependent modulations of the cortical signal during navigation. Despite finding few differences between the encoding and retrieval phases of the task, we identified transient time-frequency patterns attributed, for instance, to attentional demand, as reflected in the alpha/gamma range, or memory workload in the delta/theta range. We confirmed that combining mobile high-density EEG and biometric measures can help unravel the brain structures and the neural modulations subtending ecological landmark-based navigation.
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
Conducting neuroscience research in the real world remains challenging because of movement‐ and environment‐related artifacts as well as missing control over stimulus presentation. The present study overcame these restrictions by using mobile electroencephalography (EEG) and data driven analysis approaches during a real‐world navigation task. During assisted navigation through an unfamiliar city environment, participants received either standard or landmark‐based auditory navigation instructions. EEG data was recorded continuously during navigation. Saccade‐ and blink‐events as well as gait‐related EEG activity were extracted from sensor level data. Brain activity associated with the navigation task was identified by subsequent source‐based cleaning of non‐brain activity and unfolding of overlapping event‐related potentials. When navigators received landmark‐based instructions compared to those receiving standard navigation instructions, the blink‐related brain potentials during navigation revealed higher amplitudes at fronto‐central leads in a time window starting at 300 ms after blinks, which was accompanied by improved spatial knowledge acquisition tested in follow‐up spatial tasks. Replicating improved spatial knowledge acquisition from previous experiments, the present study revealed eye‐movement related brain potentials to point to the involvement of higher cognitive processes and increased processing of incoming information during periods of landmark‐based instructions. The study revealed neuronal correlates underlying visuo‐spatial information processing during assisted navigation in the real‐world providing a new analysis approach for neuroscientific research in freely moving participants in uncontrollable real‐world environments.
Klaus Gramann
added 4 research items
Detecting and correcting incorrect body movements is an essential part of everyday interaction with one's environment. The human brain has a constant monitoring system that controls and adjusts our actions according to our surroundings. However, when our brain's predictions about a planned action do not match the sensory inputs resulting from that action, cognitive conflict occurs. Much is known about cognitive conflict in 1D/2D environments; however, less is known about the role of movement characteristics on cognitive conflict in 3D environment. Hence, we devised an object selection task in a virtual reality environment to test how the velocity of hand movements impact a number of brain responses. From a series of analyses of EEG recordings synchronized with motion capture, we found that the velocity of the participants' hand movements modulated the brain's proprioception during the task and induced prediction error negativity. Additionally, prediction error negativity originates in the anterior cingulate cortex and is itself modulated by the ballistic phase of the hand's movement. These findings suggest that velocity is an essential component of integrating hand movements with visual and proprioceptive information during interactions with real and virtual objects.
Conducting neuroscience research in the real world remains challenging because of movement-and environment-related artifacts as well as missing control over stimulus presentation. The present study demonstrated that it is possible to investigate the neuronal correlates underlying visuo-spatial information processing during real-world navigation. Using mobile EEG allowed for extraction of saccade-and blink-related potentials as well as gait-related EEG activity. In combination with source-based cleaning of non-brain activity and unfolding of overlapping event-related activity, brain activity of naturally behaving humans was revealed even in a complex and dynamic city environment. K E Y W O R D S natural cognition, mobile EEG, blink-related potentials, saccade-related potentials, gait artifacts
The augmentation of landmarks in auditory navigation instructions had been shown to improve incidental spatial knowledge acquisition during assisted navigation. Here, two driving simulator experiments are reported that replicated this effect even when adding a three-week delay between navigation and spatial tasks and varying the degree of detail in the provided landmark information. Performance in free- and cued-recall of landmarks and driving the route again without assistance demonstrated increased landmark and route knowledge when navigating with landmark-based compared to standard instructions. The results emphasize that small changes to existing navigation systems can foster spatial knowledge acquisition during every-day navigation.
Klaus Gramann
added a research item
Detecting and correcting incorrect body movements is an essential part of everyday interaction with one's environment. The human brain provides a monitoring system that constantly controls and adjusts our actions according to our surroundings. However, when our brain's predictions about a planned action do not match the sensory inputs resulting from that action, cognitive conflict occurs. Much is known about cognitive conflict in 1D/2D environments; however, less is known about the role of movement characteristics associated with cognitive conflict in 3D environment. Hence, we devised an object selection task in a virtual reality (VR) environment to test how the velocity of hand movements impacts human brain responses. From a series of analyses of EEG recordings synchronized with motion capture, we found that the velocity of the participants’ hand movements modulated the brain's response to proprioceptive feedback during the task and induced a prediction error negativity (PEN). Additionally, the PEN originates in the anterior cingulate cortex and is itself modulated by the ballistic phase of the hand's movement. These findings suggest that velocity is an essential component of integrating hand movements with visual and proprioceptive information during interactions with real and virtual objects.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Time-limited free access (Elsevier pseudo-OA) to our recent #MoBI paper headed by Janna Protzak at @TUBerlin where she uses deconvolution of overlapping events (using the great Unfold Toolbox by Benedikt Ehinger & @OlafDimigen) in young and old participants during overground dual-task walking.
The results demonstrate the early visual P1-amplitudes and latencies to covary with response accuracy (misses) and latency of the P1 in the elderly.
Impressive #MoBI setup and analyses with important insights about the assumed P300 decrease in dual-tasks which is not present in older participants in our study.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
To all interested in MoBI research and talks related to EEG in general and MoBI specifically, the BeMoBIL just launched its YouTube channel.
You will find a few first videos of experiments from the BeMoBIL. In addition, we will post videos recorded from talks on a wide range of topics related to MoBI and EEG in general.
Hope you'll find it interesting and helpful.
 
Teodoro Solis-Escalante
added an update
On December 3rd 2020 (15:00 UTC) the International Society of Posture and Gait Research will host an online symposium on cortical control of balance and gait.
This symposium will present recently revealed cortical correlates of balance and gait, which show that cortical activity does not only indicate cognitive and motor interference (for example during dual task) but also reflects dynamic adaptation of the gait pattern and reactive balance responses.
 
Pierfilippo De Sanctis
added a research item
Behavioral findings suggest that aging alters the involvement of cortical sensorimotor mechanisms in postural control. However, corresponding accounts of the underlying neural mechanisms remain sparse, especially the extent to which these mechanisms are affected during more demanding tasks. Here, we set out to elucidate cortical correlates of altered postural stability in younger and older adults. 3D body motion tracking and high-density electroencephalography (EEG) were measured while 14 young adults (mean age = 24 years, 43% women) and 14 older adults (mean age = 77 years, 50% women) performed a continuous balance task under four different conditions. Manipulations were applied to the base of support (either regular or tandem (heel-to-toe) stance) and visual input (either static visual field or dynamic optic flow). Standing in tandem, the more challenging position, resulted in increased sway for both age groups, but for the older adults, only this effect was exacerbated when combined with optic flow compared to the static visual display. These changes in stability were accompanied by neuro-oscillatory modulations localized to midfrontal and parietal regions. A cluster of electro-cortical sources localized to the supplementary motor area showed a large increase in theta spectral power (4-7 Hz) during tandem stance, and this modulation was much more pronounced for the younger group. Additionally, the older group displayed widespread mu (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) suppression as balance tasks placed more demands on postural
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The project "TWINning the BRAIN with machine learning for neuro-muscular efficiency" (TwinBrain; https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/952401) funded under the "Horizon 2020 Twinning widespread-05-2020" program is headed by Dr. Uros Marusic from the Institute for Kinesiological Research, Science and Research Centre Koper (ZRS Koper), Slovenia. The Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Labs (BeMoBIL; https://blogs.tu-berlin.de/bpn_bemobil/) will be a central project partner in the project which officially started on November 1st 2020 with a duration of three years.
The team from TU Berlin is composed of @KlausGramann, Bettina Wollesen and Timo Berg. Further project partners include the Université de Genève, Switzerland with @ChristophMichel and Martin Seeber and the Neurology Department of Cattinara Hospital, Italy with @NeuroTrieste. The € 0.9M project with a duration of three years aims to establish a research and diagnostic centre in the field of neuromuscular efficiency and to understand the functioning and control of the central nervous system during movement.
The ultimate goal of the project is to set up the SloMoBIL: Slovenian Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Laboratory, which will be established through the transfer of knowledge and technology from BeMoBIL at TU Berlin. MoBI uses synchronous recordings of brain (electroencephalography, EEG) and behavioural data (motion capture) in combination with data-driven analyses methods to better understand brain dynamics in actively moving humans. The TwinBrain project plans to implement machine learning methods (Université de Genève) that can statistically “learn” nonlinear relationships between brain dynamics and behaviour. This will further extend the MoBI method and will ultimately be applied to investigate brain dynamics in patients suffering from Morbus Parkinson to develop new intervention and training approaches (Neurology Department of Cattinara Hospital).
Summer schools are planned and we are looking forward to hosting the first MoBI summer school next year spring (updates following soon).
 
Zakaria Djebbara
added a research item
Action is a medium of collecting sensory information about the environment, which in turn is shaped by architectural affordances. Affordances characterize the fit between the physical structure of the body and capacities for movement and interaction with the environment, thus relying on sensorimotor processes associated with exploring the surroundings. Central to sensorimotor brain dynamics, the attentional mechanisms directing the gating function of sensory signals share neuronal resources with motor-related processes necessary to inferring the external causes of sensory signals. Such a predictive coding approach suggests that sensorimotor dynamics are sensitive to architectural affordances that support or suppress specific kinds of actions for an individual. However, how architectural affordances relate to the attentional mechanisms underlying the gating function for sensory signals remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that event-related desynchronization of alpha-band oscillations in parieto-occipital and medio-temporal regions covary with the architectural affordances. Source-level time-frequency analysis of data recorded in a motor-priming Mobile Brain/Body Imaging experiment revealed strong event-related desynchronization of the alpha band to originate from the posterior 23 cingulate complex and bilateral parahippocampal areas. Our results firstly contribute to the understanding of how the brain resolves architectural affordances relevant to behaviour. Second, our results indicate that the alpha-band originating from the posterior cingulate complex covaries with the architectural affordances before participants interact with the environment. During the interaction, the bilateral parahippocampal areas dynamically reflect the affordable behaviour as perceived through the visual system. We conclude that the sensorimotor dynamics are developed for processing behaviour-relevant features in the designed environment.
Marius Klug
added a research item
Recent developments in EEG hardware and analyses approaches allow for recordings in both stationary and mobile settings. Irrespective of the experimental setting, EEG recordings are contaminated with noise that has to be removed before the data can be functionally interpreted. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a commonly used tool to remove artifacts such as eye movement, muscle activity, and external noise from the data and to analyze activity on the level of EEG effective brain sources. The effectiveness of filtering the data is one key preprocessing step to improve the decomposition that has been investigated previously. However, no study thus far compared the different requirements of mobile and stationary experiments regarding the preprocessing for ICA decomposition. We thus evaluated how movement in EEG experiments, the number of channels, and the high-pass filter cutoff during preprocessing influence the ICA decomposition. We found that for commonly used settings (stationary experiment, 64 channels, 0.5 Hz filter), the ICA results are acceptable. However, high-pass filters of up to 2 Hz cutoff frequency should be used in mobile experiments, and more channels require a higher filter to reach an optimal decomposition. Fewer brain ICs were found in mobile experiments, but cleaning the data with ICA has been proved to be important and functional even with low-density channel setups. Based on the results, we provide guidelines for different experimental settings that improve the ICA decomposition. K E Y W O R D S artifact removal, electroencephalogram, independent component analysis, mobile brain/body imaging, preprocessing
Klaus Gramann
added 2 research items
Neuroscience of dance is an emerging field with important applications related to health and well‐being, as dance has shown potential to foster adaptive neuroplasticity and is increasingly popular as a therapeutic activity or adjunct therapy for people living with conditions such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s Diseases. However, the multimodal nature of dance presents challenges to researchers aiming to identify mechanisms involved when dance is used to combat neurodegeneration or support healthy aging. Requiring simultaneous engagement of motor and cognitive domains, dancing includes coordination of systems involved in timing, memory, and spatial learning. Studies on dance to this point rely primarily on assessments of brain dynamics and structure through pre/post tests or studies on expertise, as traditional brain imaging modalities restrict participant movement to avoid movement‐related artifacts. In this paper, we describe the process of designing and implementing a study that uses Mobile Brain/body Imaging (MoBI) to investigate real‐time changes in brain dynamics and behaviour during the process of learning and performing a novel dance choreography. We show the potential for new insights to emerge from the coordinated collection of movement and brain‐based data, and the implications of these in an emerging field whose medium is motion.
When walking in our natural environment, we often solve additional cognitive tasks. This increases the demand of resources needed for both the cognitive and motor systems, resulting in Cognitive‐Motor Interference (CMI). A large portion of neurophysiological investigations on CMI took place in static settings, emphasizing the experimental rigor but overshadowing the ecological validity. As a more ecologically valid alternative to treadmill and desktop‐based set‐ups to investigate CMI, we developed a dual‐task walking scenario in virtual reality (VR) combined with Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI). We aimed at investigating how brain dynamics are modulated by dual‐task overground walking with an additional task in the visual domain. Participants performed a visual discrimination task in VR while standing (single‐task) and walking overground (dual‐task). Even though walking had no impact on the performance in the visual discrimination task, a P3 amplitude reduction along with changes in power spectral densities (PSDs) were observed for discriminating visual stimuli during dual‐task walking. These results reflect an impact of walking on the parallel processing of visual stimuli even when the cognitive task is particularly easy. This standardized and easy to modify VR‐paradigm helps to systematically study CMI, allowing researchers to control for the impact of additional task complexity of tasks in different sensory modalities. Future investigations implementing an improved virtual design with more challenging cognitive and motor tasks will have to investigate the roles of both cognition and motion, allowing for a better understanding of the functional architecture of attention reallocation between cognitive and motor systems during active behavior.
Julian Elias Reiser
added a research item
Adaptively changing between different tasks while in locomotion is a fundamental prerequisite of modern daily life. The cognitive processes underlying dual tasking have been investigated extensively using EEG. Due to technological restrictions, however, this was not possible for dual task scenarios including locomotion. With new technological opportunities, this became possible and cognitive-motor interference can be studied, even in outside-the-lab environments. In the present study, participants carried out a cognitive-motor interference task as they responded to cued, auditory task-switch stimuli while performing locomotive tasks with increasing complexity (standing, walking, traversing an obstacle course). We observed increased subjective workload ratings as well as decreased behavioral performance for increased movement complexity and cognitive task difficulty. A higher movement load went along with a decrease of parietal P2, N2, and P3 amplitudes and frontal Theta power. A higher cognitive load, on the other hand, was reflected by decreased frontal CNV amplitudes. Additionally, a connectivity analysis using inter-site phase coherence revealed that higher movement as well as cognitive task difficulty had an impairing effect on fronto-parietal connectivity. In conclusion, subjective ratings, behavioral performance, and electrophysiological results indicate that less cognitive resources were available to be deployed towards the execution of the cognitive task when in locomotion compared to standing still. Connectivity results also show a scarcity of attentional resources when switching a task during the highest movement complexity condition. Summarized, all findings indicate a central role of attentional control regarding cognitive-motor dual tasking and an inherent limitation of cognitive resources.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Successful test of our hygiene protocol yesterday together with Sein Jeung and Chris Hilton
Preparation times are increased but in general, no much extra time with participants.
Thanks a lot to a great team at @BeMoBIL working on the protocol with special thanks to Timo Berg and support from other labs including Edmund Wascher @JohnFoxe and the guidelines provided by @StevenLuck and his group.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Congrats Hasan Ayaz , Frédéric Dehais , and Waldemar Karwowski, field chief editors for the Frontiers in Neuroergonomics journal.
I am looking forward to serving as a specialty editor for the Cognitive Neuroergonomics section. https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/neuroergonomics/sections/cognitive-neuroergonomics
We invite all Neuroergonomics researchers to submit your work to one of the six sections of Frontiers in Neuroergonomics. This will be the first journal family dedicated to your research at the intersection of neuroscience and human factors.
Let's produce a high-quality home for our scientific work.
 
Hasan Ayaz
added an update
Dear friends and colleauges,
Our new journal, Frontiers in Neuroergonomics launched today! Please consider submitting your best neuroergonomics papers :)
 
Teodoro Solis-Escalante
added a research item
The goal of this study was to determine whether the cortical responses elicited by whole‐body balance perturbations were similar to established cortical markers of action monitoring. Postural changes imposed by balance perturbations elicit a robust negative potential (N1) and a brisk increase of theta activity in the electroencephalogram recorded over midfrontal scalp areas. Because action monitoring is a cognitive function proposed to detect errors and initiate corrective adjustments, we hypothesized that the possible cortical markers of action monitoring during balance control (N1 potential and theta rhythm) scale with perturbation intensity and the eventual execution of reactive stepping responses (as opposed to feet‐in‐place responses). We recorded high‐density electroencephalogram from eleven young individuals, who participated in an experimental balance assessment. The participants were asked to recover balance following anteroposterior translations of the support surface at various intensities, while attempting to maintain both feet in place. We estimated source‐resolved cortical activity using independent component analysis. Combining time‐frequency decomposition and group‐level general linear modeling of single‐trial responses, we found a significant relation of the interaction between perturbation intensity and stepping responses with multiple cortical features from the midfrontal cortex, including the N1 potential, and theta, alpha, and beta rhythms. Our findings suggest that the cortical responses to balance perturbations index the magnitude of a deviation from a stable postural state to predict the need for reactive stepping responses. We propose that the cortical control of balance may involve cognitive control mechanisms (i.e., action monitoring) that facilitate postural adjustments to maintain postural stability.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
If you have worked with any kind of motion data, regardless of virtual or physical, with or without brain imaging data, please take a few minutes to answer this survey on brain imaging data standards (BIDS) for motion data.
Sein Jeung and our group are working with others on this standardization and we need input from the research community regarding your procedures and requirements.
Your opinion will help us establish data sharing standards for motion data, making all the valuable data sets out there more readable to everyone. Thanks a lot!
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
And here are the presentations of the Brain Products Mobile Brain/Body Imaging award!
Great presentations of impressive MoBI experiments and new insights plus two presentations by myself and Scott Makeig to introduce the MoBI idea
Enjoy presentations by the winners Zakaria Djebbara @Andrewnordin, and @JamesDowsett
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The presentation on the use of head-mounted VR protocols for MoBI research by @KlausGramann from last weeks ANT webinar is now online:
I am happy to receive feedback and comments.
 
Paulo Estevão Franco-Alvarenga
added a research item
The central and peripheral effects of caffeine remain debatable. We verified whether increases in endurance performance after caffeine ingestion occurred together with changes in primary motor cortex (MC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation, neuromuscular efficiency (NME), and electroencephalography-electromyography coherence (EEG-EMG coherence). Twelve participants performed a time-to-task failure isometric contraction at 70% of the maximal voluntary contraction after ingesting 5 mg/kg of caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA), in a crossover and counterbalanced design. MC (Cz) and PFC (Fp1) EEG alpha wave and vastus lateralis (VL) muscle EMG were recorded throughout the exercise. EEG-EMG coherence was calculated through the magnitude squared coherence analysis in MC EEG gamma-wave (CI > 0.0058). Moreover, NME was obtained as the force-VL EMG ratio. When compared to PLA, CAF improved the time to task failure (p = 0.003, d = 0.75), but reduced activation in MC and PFC throughout the exercise (p = 0.027, d = 1.01 and p = 0.045, d = 0.95, respectively). Neither NME (p = 0.802, d = 0.34) nor EEG-EMG coherence (p = 0.628, d = 0.21) was different between CAF and PLA. The results suggest that CAF improved muscular performance through a modified central nervous system (CNS) response rather than through alterations in peripheral muscle or central-peripheral coupling.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
On June 24th ANT hosts a webinar with Prof. @KlausGramann
You can register at http://ow.ly/cCFF50AcmWQ by 22 June.
I will talk about the protocols which combine mobile brain imaging with motion capture and virtual reality, discuss technical issues and new insights from studies conducted at the Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging labs.
See you next Wednesday, Jun2 24th.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The 2020 Brain Products MoBI Award is coming up - Today, June 16th with presentations of great Mobile Brain/Body Imaging research by Zakaria Djebbara @Andrewnordin, @JamesDowsett, as well as Klaus Gramann and Scott Makeig
Join us online for learning about three great MoBI projects presented by the winners of this year's award.
In addition, KlausGramann and Scott Makeig will present on Mobile Brain/Body Imaging.
See you there
 
Marius Klug
added a research item
Recent developments in EEG hardware and analyses approaches allow for recordings in both stationary and mobile settings. Irrespective of the experimental setting, EEG recordings are contaminated with noise that has to be removed before the data can be functionally interpreted. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a commonly used tool to remove artifacts such as eye movement, muscle activity, and external noise from the data and to analyze activity on the level of EEG effective brain sources. While the effectiveness of filtering the data as one key preprocessing step to improve the decomposition has been investigated previously, no study thus far compared the different requirements of mobile and stationary experiments regarding the preprocessing for ICA decomposition. We thus evaluated how movement in EEG experiments, the number of channels, and the high-pass filter cutoff during preprocessing influence the ICA decomposition. We found that for commonly used settings (stationary experiment, 64 channels, 0.5 Hz filter), the ICA results are acceptable. However, high-pass filters of up to 2 Hz cutoff frequency should be used in mobile experiments, and more channels require a higher filter to reach an optimal decomposition. Fewer brain ICs were found in mobile experiments, but cleaning the data with ICA proved to be important and functional even with 16 channels. Based on the results, we provide guidelines for different experimental settings that improve the ICA decomposition.
Hasan Ayaz
added a research item
For over two centuries, the wheelchair has been one of the most common assistive devices for individuals with locomotor impairments without many modifications. Wheelchair control is a complex motor task that increases both the physical and cognitive workload. New wheelchair interfaces, including Power Assisted devices, can further augment users by reducing the required physical effort, however little is known on the mental effort implications. In this study, we adopted a neuroergonomic approach utilizing mobile and wireless functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based brain monitoring of physically active participants. 48 volunteers (30 novice and 18 experienced) selfpropelled on a wheelchair with and without a PowerAssist interface in both simple and complex realistic environments. Results indicated that as expected, the complex more difficult environment led to lower task performance complemented by higher prefrontal cortex activity compared to the simple environment. The use of the PowerAssist feature had significantly lower brain activation compared to traditional manual control only for novices. Expertise led to a lower brain activation pattern within the middle frontal gyrus, complemented by performance metrics that involve lower cognitive workload. Results here confirm the potential of the Neuroergonomic approach and that direct neural activity measures can complement and enhance task performance metrics. We conclude that the cognitive workload benefits of PowerAssist are more directed to new users and difficult settings. The approach demonstrated here can be utilized in future studies to enable greater personalization and understanding of mobility interfaces within real-world dynamic environments.
Klaus Gramann
added an update
This year’s Brain Products #MoBIAward winners are announced.
Congratulations to Zakaria Djebbara @Andrew Nording you tied for the first place and to @James Dowsett for 3rd place!
The jury chose three impressive MoBI papers that demonstrate the advanced methods used in the field and the new insights that Mobile Brain/Body Imaging allow.
All three winners will present their work during the MoBI Award 2020 online Symposium on June 16th. Join them together with Scott Makeig and me (@Klaus Gramann) and the Brain Products team to learn more about their research, how they used MoBI to adrees their research question and what they discovered.
Tickets are free and I am looking for a delightful series of presentations on great of MoBI research!
See you on June 16th.
1st place:
1st place
3rd place
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Thank you for your interest in MoBI and patience while we examined all the options in a world-wide crisis that requires a rethinking of our established plans.
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the committee of the 4th International Mobile Brain/Body Imaging conference came to the decision to postpone the 4th International MoBI Conference until Summer 2021. It will be at the same place and the same days...only one year later.
All authors of submitted and accepted abstracts will be guaranteed a spot at the 2021 conference (and of course will have a chance to update or completely re-do their submission). We'll be announcing the abstract reviews and acceptance by the end of the month as originally planned.
This is a sad decision for all of us involved in planning this event and we are sure also for all of you who were looking forward to this meeting. I would like to thank all organizers, especially John R Iversen and the team at SCCN for all the time and efforts they have dedicated to the preparation of this meeting.
We sincerely wish you and yours the best health and success as you grapple with the unprecedented situation in which we all find ourselves together. We're already excited to welcome you to San Diego in Summer 2021.
NEW WEBSITE COMING SOON...
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic the guest editors of the MoBI special issue "Time to move" have extended the deadline for submissions to May 29th.
Time to move: brain dynamics underlying natural action and cognition (submission date closes May 29th, 2020)
We wish you and yours to stay healthy in these difficult times in which we all find ourselves together. And we are looking forward to your submissions to the special issue.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
If you are an interested urbanist or architect with curiosity to explore the human brain and how it works in the built environment - apply!
This is an amazing opportunity to work with Francisco J. Parada and me in Santiago, Chile and in Berlin, Germany on #MoBI and #urbanism for a fully funded 3 years.
We will develop a proposal to investigate human brain dynamics and additional physiological parameters in participants moving through real-world build environments.
You will work in Santiago at Francisco J. Parada lab and in Berlin at the #Berlin Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Labs.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Dear Friends and Colleagues,
We're gratified by the many excellent submissions to the conference so far. It is shaping up to be a great meeting. It is not too late to submit
We would like to reassure you that as of now, the MoBI conference will proceed as planned. June is still months away and the situation could change, so we will be carefully monitoring the evolving situation with coronavirus and travel restrictions and will keep you posted. Please check http://mobi2020.ucsd.edu for updates.
Several people have contacted us with uncertainties about travel, and in response, we will offer the opportunity to participate remotely and present via videoconference to those who are unable to travel in June due to the coronavirus.
Finally, given the general uncertainty, if you need extra time, we will extend the abstract submission deadline to March 20th
Looking forward to a fantastic meeting.
Best regards,
John R Iversen & Klaus Gramann (Co-Chairs)
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
All researchers interested in online data synchronization for MoBI and any other kind of experimental setups do not forget to register for the LSL-workshop on the Sunday right before the MoBI conference starts!
Sunday, June 7th, 2020
This will be a unique opportunity to get insights from the developers.
The 2nd Hands-on Lab Streaming Layer Workshop, hosted by the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), will take place on Sunday, June 7, 2020. Participants will be expected to bring laptops with MATLAB installed so as to be able to participate in the practical sessions. The tutorial workshop will introduce and demonstrate the use of the Lab Streaming Layer (LSL) software environment, the associated Extensible data Format (XDF), as well as the LSL applications programming interface (api) and associated Neuropipe data recording and visualization and MoBILAB data review and analysis software. The format will be a lecture by principal LSL developer Christian Kothe followed by live hands-on applications demonstrations and api programming sessions. An on-site lunch and concluding tea will enhance opportunities for social networking among LSL users and code developers.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Great work by Federica Nenna , Cao Tri Do , and @Janna Protzak form the BeMoBIL group.
Federica stayed during her Master intern in Berlin and worked herself into MoBI, the setup and analyses and produced this. Congrats!
and available here on RG:
Thanks also to Zakaria Djebbara who was always present in the background for support.
In this work, we demonstrate that there are clear electrophysiological parameters in the time and frequency domain that reflect Cognitive-Motor Interference (CMI) during natural overground walking even in the absence of performance decline. This is an important step towards the comparability of treadmill and natural walking dual-task scenarios and a nice VR tool that can be systematically extended to different difficulty levels and sensory domains.
Abstract. While walking in our natural environment, we continuously solve additional cognitive tasks. This increases the demand of resources needed for both the cognitive and motor systems, resulting in Cognitive-Motor Interference (CMI). While it is well known that a performance decrease in one or both tasks can be observed, little is known about human brain dynamics underlying CMI during dual-task walking. Moreover, a large portion of previous investigations on CMI took place in static settings, emphasizing the experimental rigor but overshadowing the ecological validity. To address these problems, we developed a dual-task walking scenario in virtual reality (VR) combined with Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI). We aimed at investigating how brain dynamics are modulated during natural overground walking while simultaneously performing a visual discrimination task in an ecologically valid scenario. Even though the visual task did not affect performance while walking, a P3 amplitude reduction along with changes in power spectral densities (PSDs) during dual-task walking were observed. Replicating previous results, this reflects the impact of walking on the parallel processing of visual stimuli, even when the cognitive task is particularly easy. This standardized and easy to modify VR-paradigm helps to systematically study CMI, allowing researchers to control the complexity of different tasks and sensory modalities. Future investigations implementing an improved virtual design with more challenging cognitive and motor tasks will have to investigate the roles of both cognition and motion, allowing for a better understanding of the functional architecture of attention reallocation between cognitive and motor systems during active behavior.
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
Dear MobIs, colleagues, and friends,
Join us San Diego for the 4TH INTERNATIONAL MOBILE BRAIN/BODY IMAGING (MoBI) CONFERENCE, which will take place
June 7-10, 2020 at the University of California San Diego hosted by the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience.
Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) is a new imaging approach employing mobile brain imaging methods synchronized to body motion capture and other behavioral and psychophysiological data streams to investigate brain dynamics accompanying natural cognitive and affective processes as humans interact with their environment and/or with others. Join MoBI researchers from around the world for three stimulating Keynotes by Stefan Debener (Benefits and pitfalls of wearable EEG), Laurel Trainor (Rhythm, prediction and multi-person interaction in music), and Sarah Robinson (Extended Organisms/Surrogate Bodies). Oral sessions will include the latest developments in imaging hardware, new software solutions to record and analyze multi-modal data streams, and MoBI applications in a wide range of research areas including spatial cognition, motor control, gait rehabilitation, sport science, music and dance, therapeutic interventions and others.
Abstract submission is now open (*Deadline March 6, 2020*) and discounted Early-Bird Registration is available through April 1st. Full conference information can be found at http://mobi2020.ucsd.edu.
In case you have questions or comments please contact the conference co-organizer John R Iversen (jiversen@ucsd.edu) or me (klaus.gramann@tu-berlin.de).
Hope to see you in San Diego this summer!
 
Klaus Gramann
added an update
The deadline for the upcoming special issue on MoBI and mobile EEG the European Journal for Neuroscience (@John J Foxe) is extended to
March 31st.
Time to Move!
Papers will be handled by expert editors Pierfilippo De Sanctis , Daniel Ferris , Johanna Wagner , Martin Seeber and me.