Project

Metreleptin treatment in generalised Lipodystrophy

Goal: Long term efficacy of human recombinant leptin in patients with generalised Lipodystrophy

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David Araujo-Vilar
added 2 research items
Purpose To evaluate the effects of metreleptin in patients with partial lipodystrophy (PL). Methods Patients aged ≥ 6 months with PL, circulating leptin < 12.0 ng/mL, and diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, or hypertriglyceridemia received metreleptin doses (once or twice daily) titrated to a mean of 0.124 mg/kg/day. Changes from baseline to month 12 in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting serum triglycerides (TGs; co-primary endpoints), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and liver volume were evaluated. Additional assessments included the proportions of patients achieving target decreases in HbA1c or fasting TGs at month 12, long-term treatment effects, and treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). Results Significant (p < 0.05) reductions in HbA1c (−0.6%), fasting TGs (−20.8%), FPG (−1.2 mmol/L), and liver volume (−13.4%) were observed in the overall PL population at month 12. In a subgroup of patients with baseline HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or TGs ≥ 5.65 mmol/L, significant (p < 0.05) reductions were seen in HbA1c (−0.9%), fasting TGs (−37.4%), FPG (−1.9 mmol/L), and liver volume (−12.4%). In this subgroup, 67.9% of patients had a ≥ 1% decrease in HbA1c or ≥ 30% decrease in fasting TGs, and 42.9% had a ≥ 2% decrease in HbA1c or ≥ 40% decrease in fasting TGs. Long-term treatment in this subgroup led to significant (p < 0.05) reductions at months 12, 24, and 36 in HbA1c, fasting TGs, and FPG. Metreleptin was well tolerated with no unexpected safety signals. The most common TEAEs were abdominal pain, hypoglycemia, and nausea. Conclusions In patients with PL, treatment with metreleptin was well tolerated and resulted in improvements in glycemic control, hypertriglyceridemia, and liver volume.
David Araujo-Vilar
added 2 research items
Purpose The purpose of this study is to summarize the effectiveness and safety of metreleptin in patients with congenital or acquired generalized lipodystrophy. Methods Patients (N=66) aged ≥6 months had lipodystrophy, low circulating leptin, and ≥1 metabolic abnormality (diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, or hypertriglyceridemia). Metreleptin dose (once or twice daily) was titrated to a mean dose of 0.10 mg/kg/day with a maximum of 0.24 mg/kg/day. Means and changes from baseline to month 12 were assessed for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting triglycerides (TGs), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Additional assessments included the proportions of patients achieving target decreases in HbA1c or fasting TGs at months 4, 12, and 36, medication changes, and estimates of liver size. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were recorded. Results Significant mean reductions from baseline were seen at month 12 for HbA1c (–2.2%, n=59) and FPG (–3.0 mmol/L, n=59) and mean percent change in fasting TGs (–32.1%, n=57) (all p≤0.001). Reductions from baseline over time in these parameters were also significant at month 36 (all p<0.001, n=14). At month 4, 34.8% of patients had a ≥1% reduction in HbA1c and 62.5% had a ≥30% reduction in fasting TGs; at month 12, 80% of patients had a ≥1% decrease in HbA1c or ≥30% decrease in TGs, and 66% had a decrease of ≥2% in HbA1c or ≥40% decrease in TGs. Of those on medications, 41%, 22%, and 24% discontinued insulin, oral antidiabetic medications, or lipid-lowering medications, respectively. Mean decrease in liver volume at month 12 was 33.8% (p<0.001, n=12). Most TEAEs were of mild/moderate severity. Conclusions In patients with generalized lipodystrophy, long-term treatment with metreleptin was well tolerated and resulted in sustained improvements in hypertriglyceridemia, glycemic control, and liver volume.
David Araujo-Vilar
added a research item
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to summarize the effectiveness and safety of metreleptin in patients with congenital or acquired generalized lipodystrophy. Methods: Patients (n = 66) aged ≥6 months had lipodystrophy, low circulating leptin, and ≥1 metabolic abnormality (diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, or hypertriglyceridemia). Metreleptin dose (once or twice daily) was titrated to a mean dose of 0.10 mg/kg/day with a maximum of 0.24 mg/kg/day. Means and changes from baseline to month 12 were assessed for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting triglycerides (TGs), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Additional assessments included the proportions of patients achieving target decreases in HbA1c or fasting TGs at months 4, 12, and 36, medication changes, and estimates of liver size. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were recorded. Results: Significant mean reductions from baseline were seen at month 12 for HbA1c (-2.2%, n = 59) and FPG (-3.0 mmol/L, n = 59) and mean percent change in fasting TGs (-32.1%, n = 57) (all p ≤ 0.001). Reductions from baseline over time in these parameters were also significant at month 36 (all p < 0.001, n = 14). At month 4, 34.8% of patients had a ≥1% reduction in HbA1c and 62.5% had a ≥30% reduction in fasting TGs; at month 12, 80% of patients had a ≥1% decrease in HbA1c or ≥30% decrease in TGs, and 66% had a decrease of ≥2% in HbA1c or ≥40% decrease in TGs. Of those on medications, 41%, 22%, and 24% discontinued insulin, oral antidiabetic medications, or lipid-lowering medications, respectively. Mean decrease in liver volume at month 12 was 33.8% (p < 0.001, n = 12). Most TEAEs were of mild/moderate severity. Conclusions: In patients with generalized lipodystrophy, long-term treatment with metreleptin was well tolerated and resulted in sustained improvements in hypertriglyceridemia, glycemic control, and liver volume.
David Araujo-Vilar
added a research item
Celia's encephalopathy (progressive encephalopathy with/without lipodystrophy, PELD) is a recessive neurodegenerative disease that is fatal in childhood. It is caused by a c.985C>T variant in the BSCL2/seipin gene that results in an aberrant seipin protein. We evaluated neurological development before and during treatment with human recombinant leptin (metreleptin) plus a dietary intervention rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the only living patient. A 7 years and 10 months old girl affected by PELD was treated at age 3 years with metreleptin, adding at age 6 omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Her mental age was evaluated using the Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDI), and brain PET/MRI was performed before treatment and at age 5, 6.5, and 7.5 years. At age 7.5 years, the girl remains alive and leads a normal life for her mental age of 30 months, which increased by 4 months over the last 18 months according to BDI. PET images showed improved glucose uptake in the thalami, cerebellum, and brainstem. This patient showed a clear slowdown in neurological regression during leptin replacement plus a high PUFA diet. The aberrant BSCL2 transcript was overexpressed in SH-SY5Y cells and was treated with docosahexaenoic acid (200 µM) plus leptin (0.001 mg/ml) for 24 h. The relative expression of aberrant BSCL2 transcript was measured by qPCR. In vitro studies showed significant reduction (32%) in aberrant transcript expression. This therapeutic approach should be further studied in this devastating disease.
David Araujo-Vilar
added 2 research items
Background: Seipin/BSCL2 mutations can cause type 2 congenital generalised lipodystrophy (BSCL) or dominant motor neurone diseases. Type 2 BSCL is frequently associated with some degree of intellectual impairment, but not to fatal neurodegeneration. In order to unveil the aetiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of a new neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a novel BSCL2 mutation, six children, four of them showing the BSCL features, were studied. Methods: Mutational and splicing analyses of BSCL2 were performed. The brain of two of these children was examined postmortem. Relative expression of BSCL2 transcripts was analysed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in different tissues of the index case and controls. Overexpressed mutated seipin in HeLa cells was analysed by immunofluorescence and western blotting. Results: Two patients carried a novel homozygous c.985C>T mutation, which appeared in the other four patients in compound heterozygosity. Splicing analysis showed that the c.985C>T mutation causes an aberrant splicing site leading to skipping of exon 7. Expression of exon 7-skipping transcripts was very high with respect to that of the non-skipped transcripts in all the analysed tissues of the index case. Neuropathological studies showed severe neurone loss, astrogliosis and intranuclear ubiquitin(+) aggregates in neurones from multiple cortical regions and in the caudate nucleus. Conclusions: Our results suggest that exon 7 skipping in the BSCL2 gene due to the c.985C>T mutation is responsible for a novel early onset, fatal neurodegenerative syndrome involving cerebral cortex and basal ganglia.
David Araujo-Vilar
added a project goal
Long term efficacy of human recombinant leptin in patients with generalised Lipodystrophy