Project

Magnetic Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a Multifunctional Platform against Glioblastoma Multiforme (SLaMM)

Goal: The SLaMM project (ERC Starting Grant 709613) aims at the development of multifunctional lipid-based nanovectors for the delivery and the targeting of drugs to the brain, in the treatment of extremely aggressive brain tumors. The nanovectors will be tested on a specifically developed in vitro model, before their final validation in vivo.

Date: 1 March 2017 - 1 March 2022

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Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Upon coming into contact with the biological environment, nanostructures are immediately covered by biomolecules, particularly by proteins forming the so-called "protein corona" (PC). The phenomenon of PC formation has gained great attention in recent years due to its implication in the use of nanostructures in biomedicine. In fact, it has been shown that the formation of the PC can impact the performance of nanostructures by reducing their stability, causing aggregation, increasing their toxicity, and providing unexpected and undesired nanostructure-cell interactions. In this work, we decided to study for the first time the formation and the evolution of PC on the surface of nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, before and after the crossing of an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Combining confocal microscopy, direct STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (dSTORM), and proteomic analysis, we were able to carry out a complete analysis of the PC formation and evolution. In particular, we highlighted that PC formation is a fast process, being formed around particles even after just 1 min of exposure to fetal bovine serum. Moreover, PC formed around particles is extremely heterogeneous: while some particles have no associated PC at all, others are completely covered by proteins. Lastly, the interaction with an in vitro BBB model strongly affects the PC composition: in particular, a large amount of the proteins forming the initial PC is lost after the BBB passage and they are partially replaced by new proteins derived from both the brain endothelial cells and the cell culture medium. Altogether, the obtained data could potentially provide new insights into the design and fabrication of lipid nanostructures for the treatment of central nervous system disorders.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Angiogenesis plays a fundamental role in tumor development, as it is crucial for tumor progression, metastasis, and invasion. In this view, anti-angiogenic therapy has received considerable attention in several cancer types to inhibit tumor vascularization, and the progress of nanotechnology offers opportunities to target and release anti-angiogenic agents in specific diseased areas. In this work, we showed that the angiogenic behavior of human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells can be inhibited by using nutlin-3a-loaded ApoE-functionalized polymeric piezoelectric nanoparticles, which can remotely respond to ultrasound stimulation. The anti-angiogenic effect, derived from the use of chemotherapy and chronic piezoelectric stimulation, leads to disruption of tubular vessel formation, decreased cells migration and invasion, and inhibition of angiogenic growth factors in the presence of migratory cues released by the tumor cells. Overall, the proposed use of remotely activated piezoelectric nanoparticles could provide a promising approach to hinder tumor-induced angiogenesis.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), also known as grade IV astrocytoma, represents the most aggressive primary brain tumor. The complex genetic heterogeneity, the acquired drug resistance, and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limit the efficacy of the current therapies, with effectiveness demonstrated only in a small subset of patients. To overcome these issues, here we propose an anticancer approach based on ultrasound-responsive drug-loaded organic piezoelectric nanoparticles. This anticancer nanoplatform consists of nutlin-3a-loaded ApoE-functionalized P(VDF-TrFE) nanoparticles, that can be remotely activated with ultrasound-based mechanical stimulations to induce drug release and to locally deliver anticancer electric cues. The combination of chemotherapy treatment with chronic piezoelectric stimulation resulted in activation of cell apoptosis and of anti-proliferation pathways, induction of cell necrosis, inhibition of cancer migration, and reduction of cell invasiveness in drug-resistant GBM cells. Obtained results pave the way for the use of innovative multifunctional nanomaterials in less invasive and more focused anticancer treatments, able to reduce drug resistance in GBM. Statement of Significance : Piezoelectric hybrid lipid-polymeric nanoparticles, efficiently encapsulating a non-genotoxic drug (nutlin-3a) and functionalized with a peptide (ApoE) that enhances their passage through the BBB, are proposed. Upon ultrasound stimulation, nanovectors resulted able to reduce cell migration, actin polymerization, and invasion ability of glioma cells, while fostering apoptotic and necrotic events. This wireless activation of anticancer action paves the way to a less invasive, more focused and efficient therapeutic strategy.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer‐related morbidity and mortality. It represents one of the greatest challenges in cancer therapy, both because of the ability of metastatic cells to spread into different organs, and because of the consequent heterogeneity that characterizes primary and metastatic tumors. Nanomaterials can potentially be used as targeting or detection agents owing to unique chemical and physical features that allow tailored and tunable theranostic functions. This review highlights nanomaterial‐based approaches in the detection and treatment of cancer metastasis, with a special focus on the evaluation of nanostructure effects on cell migration, invasion, and angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models represent an efficient platform to conduct high-throughput quantitative investigations on BBB crossing ability of different drugs. Such models provide a closed system where different fundamental variables can be efficaciously tuned and monitored, and issues related to scarce accessibility of animal brains and ethics can be addressed. In this work, we propose the fabrication of cellulose acetate (CA) porous bio-scaffolds by exploiting both vapor-induced phase separation (VIPS) and electrospinning methods. Parameters of fabrication have been tuned in order to obtain porous and transparent scaffolds suitable for optical/confocal microscopy, where endothelial cell monolayers are allowed to growth thus obtaining biomimetic BBB in vitro models. Concerning VIPS-based approach, CA membranes fabricated using 25% H 2 O + 75% EtOH as non-solvent showed submicrometer-scale porosity and an optical transmittance comparable to that one of commercially available poly(ethylene terephthalate) membranes. CA membranes fabricated via VIPS have been exploited for obtaining multicellular BBB models through the double seeding of endothelial cells and astrocytes on the two surfaces of the membrane. Electrospun CA substrates, instead, were characterized by micrometer-sized pores, and were unsuitable for double seeding approach and long term studies. However, the potential exploitation of the electrospun CA substrates for modeling blood-brain-tumor barrier and studying cell invasiveness has been speculated. The features of the obtained models have been critically compared and discussed for future applications.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant neoplasia having origin in the brain. The current treatments involve surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, being the complete surgical resection the best option for the patient survival chances. However, in those cases where a complete removal is not possible, radiation and chemotherapy are applied. In this review the main challenges of chemotherapy, and how they can be overcome with the help of nanomedicine, are approached. Natural pathways to cross the blood‐brain barrier (BBB) are detailed, and different in vivo studies where these pathways have been mimicked functionalizing the nanomaterial surface are shown. Later, lipid‐based nanocarriers, such as liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and nanostructured lipid carriers, are presented. To finish, recent studies that have used lipid‐based nanosystems carrying not only therapeutic agents, yet also magnetic nanoparticles are described. Although the advantages of using this type of nanosystems are explained ‐including their biocompatibility, the possibility of modifying their surface to enhance the cell targeting, and their intrinsic ability of BBB crossing‐ it is important to mention that research in this field is still at its early stage, and extensive pre‐clinical and clinical investigations are mandatory in the close future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive brain tumor due to its high invasiveness and genetic heterogeneity. Moreover, the blood-brain barrier prevents many drugs from reaching a therapeutic concentration at the tumor site, and most of the chemotherapeutics lacks in specificity towards cancer cells, accumulating in both healthy and diseased tissues, with severe side effects. Here, we present in vitro investigations on lipid-based nanovectors encapsulating a drug, nutlin-3a, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, to combine the pro-apoptotic action of the drug and the hyperthermia mediated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stimulated with an alternating magnetic field. The nanovectors are functionalized with the peptide angiopep-2 to target a receptor overexpressed in glioma cells, and to induce receptor-mediated transcytosis through the blood-brain barrier. The glioblastoma multiforme targeting efficiency and the blood-brain barrier crossing abilities were tested through in vitro fluidic models, where different human cell lines were placed to mimic the tumor microenvironment. These nanovectors successfully cross the blood-brain barrier model, maintaining their targeting abilities for glioblastoma multiforme with minimal interaction with healthy cells. Moreover, we showed that nanovector-assisted hyperthermia induces a lysosomal membrane permeabilization that not only initiates a caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, yet also enhances the anticancer efficacy of the drug.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of brain cancer, characterized by rapid progression, resistance to treatments, and low survival rates; the development of a targeted treatment for this disease is still today an unattained objective. Among the different strategies developed in the latest few years for the targeted delivery of nanotherapeutics, homotypic membrane-membrane recognition is one of the most promising and efficient. In this work, we present an innovative drug-loaded nanocarrier with improved targeting properties based on the homotypic recognition of GBM cells. The developed nanoplatform consists of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) and coated with cell membranes (CM) extracted from GBM cells (Dox-CM-BNNTs). We demonstrated as Dox-CM-BNNTs are able to specifically target and kill GBM cells in vitro, leaving unaffected healthy brain cells, upon successful crossing an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. The excellent targeting performances of the nanoplatform can be ascribed to the protein component of the membrane coating, and proteomic analysis of differently expressed membrane proteins present on the CM of GBM cells and of healthy astrocytes allowed identification of potential candidates involved in the process of homotypic cancer cell recognition.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. As implied by its name, the disease displays impressive intrinsic heterogeneity. Among other complications, inter‐ and intratumoral diversity hamper glioblastoma research and therapy, typically leaving patients with little hope for long‐term survival. Extensive genetic analyses, including omics, characterize several recurrent mutations. However, confounding factors mask crucial aspects of the pathology to conventional bulk approaches. In recent years, single‐cell omics have made their first appearance in cancer research, and the methodology is about to reach its full potential for glioblastoma too. Here, recent glioblastoma single‐cell omics investigations are reviewed, and most promising routes toward less grim prognoses and more efficient therapeutics are discussed.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Aiming at finding new solutions for fighting glioblastoma multiforme, one of most aggressive and lethal human cancer, here an in vitro validation of multifunctional nanovectors for drug delivery and hyperthermia therapy is proposed. Hybrid magnetic lipid nanoparticles have been fully characterized and tested on a multi-cellular complex model resembling the tumor microenvironment. Investigations of cancer therapy based on a physical approach (namely hyperthermia) and on a pharmaceutical approach (by exploiting chemotherapy drug temozolomide) have been extensively carried out, by evaluating antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on 3D models of glioblastoma multiforme. A systematic study of transcytosis and endocytosis mechanisms has been moreover performed with multiple complimentary investigations, besides a detailed description of local temperature increments following hyperthermia application. Finally, an in-depth proteomic analysis corroborated the obtained findings, which can be summarized in the preparation of a versatile, multifunctional, and effective nanoplatform able to overcome the blood-brain barrier and to induce powerful anti-cancer effects on in vitro complex models.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Every year, cancer is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide and, even though much progress has been achieved in medicine, there are still many issues that must be addressed in order to improve cancer therapy. For this reason, oncological research is putting a lot of effort towards finding new and efficient therapies which can alleviate critical side effects caused by conventional treatments. Different technologies are currently under evaluation in clinical trials or have been already introduced into clinical practice. While nanomedicine is contributing to the development of biocompatible materials both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, bioengineering of extracellular vesicles and cells derived from patients has allowed designing ad hoc systems and univocal targeting strategies. In this review, we will provide an in-depth analysis of the most innovative advances in basic and applied cancer research.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
In this study, hybrid nanocubes composed of magnetite (Fe3O4) and manganese dioxide (MnO2), coated with U‐251 MG cell‐derived membranes (CM‐NCubes) are synthesized. The CM‐NCubes demonstrate a concentration‐dependent oxygen generation (up to 15%), and, for the first time in the literature, an intracellular increase of temperature (6 °C) due to the exothermic scavenging reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is showed. Internalization studies demonstrate that the CM‐NCubes are internalized much faster and at a higher extent by the homotypic U‐251 MG cell line compared to other cerebral cell lines. The ability of the CM‐NCubes to cross an in vitro model of the blood‐brain barrier is also assessed. The CM‐NCubes show the ability to respond to a static magnet and to accumulate in cells even under flowing conditions. Moreover, it is demonstrated that 500 µg mL−1 of sorafenib‐loaded or unloaded CM‐NCubes are able to induce cell death by apoptosis in U‐251 MG spheroids that are used as a tumor model, after their exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Finally, it is shown that the combination of sorafenib and AMF induces a higher enzymatic activity of caspase 3 and caspase 9, probably due to an increment in reactive oxygen species by means of hyperthermia.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Cancer accounts for millions of deaths every year and, due to the increase and aging of the world population, the number of new diagnosed cases is continuously rising. Although many progresses in early diagnosis and innovative therapeutic protocols have been already set in clinical practice, still a lot of critical aspects need to be addressed in order to efficiently treat cancer and to reduce several drawbacks caused by conventional therapies. Nanomedicine has emerged as a very promising approach to support both early diagnosis and effective therapy of tumors, and a plethora of different inorganic and organic multifunctional nanomaterials have been ad hoc designed to meet the constant demand for new solutions in cancer treatment. Given their unique features and extreme versatility, nanocarriers represent an innovative and easily adaptable tool both for imaging and targeted therapy purposes, in order to improve the specific delivery of drugs administered to cancer patients. The current review reports an in-depth analysis of the most recent research studies aiming at developing both inorganic and organic materials for nanomedical applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. A detailed overview of different approaches currently undergoing clinical trials or already approved in clinical practice is provided.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Aim: Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, and current treatments are limited to palliative cares. The present study proposes a nanotechnology-based solution able to improve both drug efficacy and its delivery efficiency. Materials & methods: Nutlin-3a and superparamagnetic nanoparticles were encapsulated in solid lipid nanoparticles, and the obtained nanovectors (nutlin-loaded magnetic solid lipid nanoparticle [Nut-Mag-SLNs]) were characterized by analyzing both their physicochemical properties and their effects on U-87 MG glioblastoma cells. Results: Nut-Mag-SLNs showed good colloidal stability, the ability to cross an in vitro blood–brain barrier model, and a superior pro-apoptotic activity toward glioblastoma cells with respect to the free drug. Conclusion: Nut-Mag-SLNs represent a promising multifunctional nanoplatform for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.
Christos Tapeinos
added a research item
Major obstacles to the successful treatment of gliolastoma multiforme are mostly related to the acquired resistance to chemotherapy drugs and, after surgery, to the cancer recurrence in correspondence of residual microscopic foci. As innovative anticancer approach, low-intensity electric stimulation represents a physical treatment able to reduce multidrug resistance of cancer and to induce remarkable anti-proliferative effects by interfering with Ca2+ and K+ homeostasis and by affecting the organization of the mitotic spindles. However, to preserve healthy cells, it is utterly important to direct the electric stimuli only to malignant cells. In this work, we propose a nanotechnological approach based on ultrasound-sensitive piezoelectric nanoparticles to remotely deliver electric stimulations to glioblastoma cells. Barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) have been functionalized with an antibody against the transferrin receptor (TfR) in order to obtain the dual targeting of blood-brain barrier and of glioblastoma cells. The remote ultrasound-mediated piezo-stimulation allowed to significantly reduce in vitro the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and, when combined with a sub-toxic concentration of temozolomide, induced an increased sensitivity to the chemotherapy treatment and remarkable anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects.
Gianni Ciofani
added an update
January 31, 2019
"Advanced theranostic nanomedicine in oncology"
Workshop, Auditorium Museo Piaggio, Pontedera (Pisa) Italy
Organized by ISTITUTO ITALIANO DI TECNOLOGIA in the framework of the European Research Council project SLaMM with the sponsorship of Frontiers
 
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
In this study, taking into consideration the limitations of the current treatments of glioblastoma multiforme, we fabricated a biomimetic lipid-based magnetic nanovector with good loading capacity and a sustained release profile of the encapsulated chemotherapeutic drug, temozolomide. These nanostructures demonstrated an enhanced release after exposure to an alternating magnetic field, and a complete release of the encapsulated drug after the synergic effect of low pH (4.5), increased concentration of hydrogen peroxide (50 μM), and increased temperature due to the applied magnetic field. In addition, these nanovectors presented excellent specific absorption rate values (up to 1345 W/g) considering the size of the magnetic component, rendering them suitable as potential hyperthermia agents. The presented nanovectors were progressively internalized in U-87 MG cells and in their acidic compartments (i.e., lysosomes and late endosomes) without affecting the viability of the cells, and their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier was preliminary investigated by using an in vitro brain endothelial cell-based model. When stimulated with alternating magnetic fields (20 mT, 750 KHz), the nanovectors demonstrated their ability to induce mild hyperthermia (43°C) and strong anticancer effects against U-87 MG cells (scarce survival of cells characterized by low proliferation rate and high apoptosis levels). The optimal anticancer effects resulted from the synergic combination of hyperthermia chronic stimulation with the controlled temozolomide release, highlighting therefore the potential of the proposed drug-loaded lipid magnetic nanovectors for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.
Christos Tapeinos
added a research item
In this chapter we present the basic principles of magnetism and how these principles are altered in relation to the size of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). In addition, we make a small reference on the physical and chemical methods that are used for the synthesis of MNPs, as well as to some of the surface functionalization techniques that are currently used and aim at improving the biological-related properties of the MNPs. After a more detailed description of the bio-applications that the MNPs find use on, some concluding remarks and an opinion for the future of the MNPs is given.
Christos Tapeinos
added a research item
With the increasing advances in the fabrication and in monitoring approaches of nanotechnology devices, novel materials are being synthesized and tested for the interaction with biological environments. Among them, smart materials in particular provide versatile and dynamically tunable platforms for the investigation and manipulation of several biological activities with very low invasiveness in hardly accessible anatomical districts. In the following, we will briefly recall recent examples of nanotechnology-based materials that can be remotely activated and controlled through different sources of energy, such as electromagnetic fields or ultrasounds, for their relevance to both basic science investigations and translational nanomedicine. Moreover, we will introduce some examples of hybrid materials showing mutually beneficial components for the development of multifunctional devices, able to simultaneously perform duties like imaging, tissue targeting, drug delivery, and redox state control. Finally, we will highlight challenging perspectives for the development of theranostic agents (merging diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities), underlining open questions for these smart nanotechnology-based devices to be made readily available to the patients in need.
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
The investigation of the crossing of exogenous substances through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is object of intensive research in biomedicine, and one of the main obstacles for reliable in vitro evaluations is represented by the difficulties at the base of developing realistic models of the barrier, which could resemble as most accurately as possible the in vivo environment. Here, for the first time, a 1:1 scale, biomimetic, and biohybrid BBB model is proposed. Microtubes inspired to the brain capillaries were fabricated through two-photon lithography and used as scaffolds for the co-culturing of endothelial-like bEnd.3 and U87 glioblastoma cells. The constructs show the maturation of tight junctions, good performances in terms of hindering dextran diffusion through the barrier, and a satisfactory trans-endothelial electrical resistance. Moreover, a mathematical model is developed, which assists in both the design of the 3D microfluidic chip and its characterization. Overall, these results show the effective formation of a bioinspired cellular barrier based on microtubes reproducing brain microcapillaries to scale. This system will be exploited as a realistic in vitro model for the investigation of BBB crossing of nanomaterials and drugs, envisaging therapeutic and diagnostic applications for several brain pathologies, including brain cancer.
Gianni Ciofani
added an update
Gianni Ciofani
added a research item
Owing to their abilities to identify diseased conditions, to modulate biological process, and to control cellular activities, magnetic nanoparticles have become one of the most popular nanomaterials exploited in the biomedical field. Targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release, hyperthermia treatments, imaging, and stimulation of several biological entities are just some of the several tasks that can be accomplished by taking advantage of magnetic nanoparticles in tandem with magnetic fields. The huge interest towards this class of nanomaterials rises from the possibility to physically drive their spatiotemporal localization inside the body, and to deliver an externally applied stimulation at a target site. They in fact behave as actual nanotransducers, converting energy stemming from the external magnetic field into heat and mechanical forces, which act as signals for therapeutic processes as hyperthermia and controlled drug release. Magnetic nanoparticles result into a non-invasive tool that enables a remote activation of biological processes, besides behaving as formidable tracers for different imaging modalities, thus allowing to simultaneously carry out diagnosis and therapy. In view of all this, owing to their multifunctional and multitasking nature, magnetic nanoparticles are already one of the most important nanotechnological protagonists in medicine and biology, enabling an actual theranostic approach in many pathological conditions. In this Concept, we first provide a brief introduction on some physical properties of magnetic materials and on important features that determine the physical properties of magnetic nanoparticles; thereafter, we will consider some major biomedical applications: hyperthermia, drug delivery / release, and nanoparticle-mediated control of biological processes, even at subcellular level.
Christos Tapeinos
added a research item
Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) comprise a category of versatile drug delivery systems that have been used in the biomedical field for more than 25 years. SLNs and NLCs have been used for the treatment of various diseases including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular, and are considered a standard treatment for the latter, due to their inherent ability to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB). In this review, a presentation of the most important brain diseases (brain cancer, ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis) is approached, followed by the basic fabrication techniques of SLNs and NLCs. A detailed description of the reported studies of the last seven years, of active and passive targeting SLNs and NLCs for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and of other brain cancers, as well as for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is also carried out. Finally, a brief description of the advantages, the disadvantages, and the future perspectives in the use of these nanocarriers is reported, aiming at giving an insight of the limitations that have to be overcome in order to result in a delivery system with high therapeutic efficacy and without the limitations of the existing nano-systems.
Gianni Ciofani
added an update
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Gianni Ciofani
added an update
1 Post Doc position – Smart Bio-Interfaces - [ Postdoc ]
Workplace: IIT@SSSA Added on: 25/01/2017 - Expires on: 20/02/2017
The Center for Micro-BioRobotics (CMBR), a Network Center of Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), based in Pontedera (Italy), is opening one Postdoctoral position in the framework of the Smart Bio-Interfaces Research Line.
CMBR has fully equipped chemical, biological and microfabrication facilities, including clean rooms (class 1000 and class 10000), chemical laboratories, BSL2 biological laboratories, and equipments for molecular biology.
The Smart Bio-Interfaces Research Line, led by Prof. Gianni Ciofani, is active in the field of smart nanomaterials for nanomedicine, bio/non-bio interactions, and biology in altered gravity conditions.
The candidate will work on the ERC granted project SLaMM (Magnetic solid lipid nanoparticles as a multifunctional platform against glioblastoma multiforme, EU contract number 709613), aiming at developing smart nanovectors for cancer therapy.
The selected candidate will be expected to design, develop, and characterize lipid nanoparticles functionalized for targeting of specific cells/tissues.
Applicants must have a PhD degree in one of the following area: Chemistry, Materials Science, Pharmaceutics or related fields.
Experiences with nanomaterials synthesis and characterization, functionalization of nanoparticles with biological ligands, drug delivery are mandatory. Experience with HPLC, NMR, and biological testing will be favourably evaluated.
Both junior and experienced candidates will be considered for the position. High level of English, both spoken and written, is an essential requirement.
Interested candidates should send their application (CV, list of publications and names of 2 referees) to applications@iit.it and to gianni.ciofani@iit.it by February 20, 2017 quoting “1 Post Doc Smart Bio-Interfaces - CB 73566”.
Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT - was founded with the objective of promoting the country's technological development and further education in science and technology. In this sense, IIT’s scientific program has a strong multidisciplinary character, merging expertise from different platforms from neuroscience to drug discovery, from nanotechnologies to computation. In order to comply with the Italian law (art. 23 of Privacy Law of the Italian Legislative Decree n. 196/03), the candidate is kindly asked to give his/her consent to allow IIT to process his/her personal data.
We inform you that the information you provide will be solely used for the purpose of assessing your professional profile to meet the requirements of Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia. Your data will be processed by Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, with its headquarters in Genoa, Via Morego 30, acting as the Data Holder, using computer and paper-based means, observing the rules on the protection of personal data, including those related to the security of data. Please also note that, pursuant to art.7 of Legislative Decree 196/2003, you may exercise your rights at any time as a party concerned by contacting the Data Manager.
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia is an Equal Opportunity Employer that actively seeks diversity in the workforce.
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Gianni Ciofani
added a project goal
The SLaMM project (ERC Starting Grant 709613) aims at the development of multifunctional lipid-based nanovectors for the delivery and the targeting of drugs to the brain, in the treatment of extremely aggressive brain tumors. The nanovectors will be tested on a specifically developed in vitro model, before their final validation in vivo.