Project

MENTUPP: Mental Health Promotion and Intervention in Occupational Settings

Goal: Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental health difficulties in the workplace in the EU, causing immense suffering and costing the global economy €1 trillion each year in lost productivity. Certain sectors, in particular construction sector, health sector, information and communication technology (ICT) sector, have an elevated risk of mental health difficulties, with those working in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) being particularly vulnerable. However, most SMEs have limited capacity to address mental health promotion and provide mental health interventions to the staff. As SMEs comprise more than 90% of all EU businesses, there is a huge potential to influence population health.

The MENTUPP project is a four-year project involving 17 partners in Europe and Australia, involving a wide range of disciplines that aimed at improving mental health and wellbeing in the workplace by developing, implementing and evaluating a comprehensive, multilevel intervention programme targeting both clinical (depressive, anxiety disorders) and non-clinical (stress, burnout, wellbeing, depressive symptoms) mental health issues, as well as combating the stigma of mental (ill-) health. The intervention will be tailored for SMEs in construction, healthcare and ICT sectors and will be assessed in a multi-country Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (CRCT). The primary goal is to improve mental health in the workplace, with a secondary goal to reduce depression and suicidal behaviour.

Date: 1 January 2020

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Project log

Kahar Abdulla
added a research item
An expert survey was designed to support the development of a workplace-based multi-country intervention tackling depression, anxiety, and mental illness-related stigma in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Academic experts and representatives of SME organisations, specific sector organisations, labour or advocacy groups, and occupational health organisations, were contacted across eight European countries and Australia. The survey comprised closed and open text questions to assess expert opinion about interventions for employees with mental health difficulties, interventions supporting their managers, and anti-stigma interventions. The survey was available in six languages. The online platform Qualtrics was used for data collection. Quantitative data was analysed through descriptive statistics and qualitative data was analysed through thematic analysis. Sixty-five of 146 experts responded, representing a 42% response rate. Results showed only 26.2% of experts agreed that employees could speak openly about mental health issues, and 81.5% of experts indicated a large or medium unmet need for support for employees with mental health issues. Psychoeducational materials, face-to-face workshops and interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy were ranked most likely to be taken up by employees. Experts rated as most useful for managers’ guidelines on how to act if an employee has mental health issues (67.7%). The greatest number of experts indicated workshops of people with lived experience of mental illness (80.0%) and awareness campaigns (78.5%) were most required to tackle stigma. Responses were consistent between experts from different countries and areas of expertise. Experts in this multinational survey assessed that interventions supporting mental health in the workplace and tackling stigma are greatly needed. A multicomponent intervention with a wide range of materials and tools is supported.
Ulrich Hegerl
added a research item
Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental health difficulties in the EU, causing immense suffering and costing the global economy EUR 1 trillion each year in lost productivity. Employees in construction, health and information and communications technology have an elevated risk of mental health difficulties. Most mental health interventions for the workplace have been targeted at larger companies and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are often overlooked despite most people being employed in SMEs. The MENTUPP intervention aims to improve mental health and wellbeing and reduce depression, anxiety, and suicidal behaviour. The MENTUPP project involves the development, implementation, and evaluation of a multilevel intervention targeting both clinical and non-clinical mental health issues and combating the stigma of mental (ill-)health, with a specific focus on SMEs. The intervention is underpinned by a framework of how to create a mentally healthy workplace by employing an integrated approach and has been informed by several systematic reviews designed to understand organisational mental health interventions and a consultation survey with key experts in the area. The intervention is facilitated through the MENTUPP Hub, an online platform that presents interactive psychoeducational materials, toolkits, and links to additional resources in an accessible and user-friendly manner. This paper presents the pilot study protocol for delivering the MENTUPP intervention in eight European countries and Australia. Each intervention country will aim to recruit at least 23 participants in 1–3 SMEs in one of the three high-risk sectors. The central aim of the pilot study will be to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and uptake of the MENTUPP intervention across the target SMEs. The findings will contribute to devising the protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial (cRCT) of the MENTUPP intervention. Findings from this study will also be used to inform the optimisation phase of the MENTUPP intervention which will aim to improve the materials and the implementation of the intervention as well as enhancing the evaluation strategy which will be employed for the cRCT.
Ulrich Hegerl
added a research item
Background. Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental health difficulties in the workplace, costing the global economy $1 trillion each year. Evidence indicates that symptoms may be reduced by interventions in the workplace. This paper is the first to systematically review psychosocial interventions for depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation and behaviours in small-to medium-size enterprises (SMEs). Methods. A systematic search following PRISMA guidelines, registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020156275), was conducted for psychosocial interventions targeting depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation/behaviour in SMEs. The PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus and two specific occupational health databases were searched, as well as four databases for grey literature, without time limit until 2nd December 2019. Results. In total, 1283 records were identified, 70 were retained for full-text screening, and seven met the inclusion criteria: three randomised controlled trials (RCTs), three before and after designs and one non-randomised trial, comprising 5,111 participants. Study quality was low to moderate according to the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. Five studies showed a reduction in depression and anxiety symptoms using techniques based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), two reported no significant change. Limitations. Low number and high heterogeneity of interventions and outcomes, high attrition and lack of rigorous RCTs. Conclusions. Preliminary evidence indicates CBT-based interventions can be effective in targeting symptoms of depression and anxiety in SME employees. There may be unique challenges to implementing programmes in SMEs. Further research is needed in this important area.
Ulrich Hegerl
added an update
On 1 May 2021, the MENTUPP Hub and the MENTUPP Pilot Study went live. The Hub is an online platform that serves as an evidence-based Mental Health Promotion and Intervention Tool for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Europe and Australia.
The MENTUPP Hub delivers psycho-educational materials, toolkits and links to additional resources. The primary aim is to improve mental health in the workplace in three sectors associated with an increased risk of mental health difficulties: construction, healthcare, and ICT. The Hub materials are further tailored for employees, employers, and managers in each sector.
By providing materials on a comprehensive range of topics, the Hub also aims to reduce depression and suicidal behavior at the individual, group, and organizational levels. These materials consist of online information packages, videos – including role-play and animated scenarios, and practical stress management exercises. Participating workplaces are encouraged to integrate these materials with their everyday working practices.
The Hub will be piloted in eight countries starting 1 May 2021 to test its feasibility, acceptability, and uptake in mental health promotion and intervention in occupational settings.
MENTUPP (Mental Health Promotion and Intervention in Occupational Settings) is an EU-funded international research project with the primary aim to improve mental health in the workplace by developing, implementing and evaluating a multilevel intervention targeting mental health difficulties in SMEs in the construction, health and ICT sectors. The secondary aim is to reduce depression and suicidal behaviour at the workplace. MENTUPP consists of 17 global partners with expertise in mental health, suicide prevention, depression, mental illness stigma, implementation science, as well as health economics.
Learn more about MENTUPP: https://www.mentuppproject.eu/
For further inquiries please contact: mentupp@eaad.net
 
Kahar Abdulla
added an update
On May 1, 2021, the EU-funded project MENTUPP, Mental Health Promotion and Intervention in Occupational Settings, will proudly support the International Labour Day 2021 and the MENTUPP Pilot Study will start in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Europe and Australia.
We spend one-third of our life working. How mental illness is addressed in our workplace can have a significant impact on our mental health, quality of life and wellbeing. When not addressed, mental illness can have harmful impacts, such as use of alcohol, other substances or self-harm. In the workplace, this can lead to absenteeism and poor productivity. A negative working environment can exacerbate mental illness. Since its outbreak, COVID-19 has had major negative psychosocial impacts, which have been worsened by lockdown restrictions and forced quarantine.
The EU-funded project MENTUPP, coordinated by Prof. Ella Arensman, aims to improve mental health of employers, managers and employees in SMEs in Europe and Australia. It addresses both non-clinical aspects such as stress, wellbeing and burnout, and clinical aspects such as depression and anxiety disorders, as well as reducing stigma related to mental health.
The MENTUPP Consortium would like to thank all of its partners for the hard work and dedication since the start of the project.
MENTUPP (Mental Health Promotion and Intervention in Occupational Settings) is an EU-funded international research project with the primary aim to improve mental health in the workplace by developing, implementing and evaluating a multilevel intervention targeting mental health difficulties in SMEs in the construction, health and ICT sectors. The secondary aim is to reduce depression and suicidal behaviour at the workplace. MENTUPP consists of 17 global partners with expertise in mental health, suicide prevention, depression, mental illness stigma, implementation science, as well as health economics.
Learn more about MENTUPP: https://www.mentuppproject.eu/
For further inquiries please contact: mentupp@eaad.net
 
Cliodhna O'Connor
added 3 research items
Background: Mental health problems are common in the working population and represent a growing concern internationally, with potential impacts on workers, organisations, workplace health and compensation authorities, labour markets and social policies. Workplace interventions that create mental health-supportive workplaces, promote mental health awareness, destigmatise mental illness and support those with mental disorders are likely to improve health and economical outcomes for employees and organisations. Identifying factors associated with successful implementation of these interventions can improve their quality and evaluation and facilitate the uptake and expansion. Therefore, we aim to review research reporting on the implementation of mental health promotion interventions delivered in workplace settings, in order to increase understanding of factors influencing successful delivery. Methods and analysis: A scoping review will be conducted incorporating a stepwise methodology to identify relevant literature reviews, primary research and grey literature. This review is registered with Research Registry (reviewregistry897). One reviewer will conduct the search to identify English language studies in the following electronic databases from 2008 through to July 1, 2020: Scopus, PROSPERO, Health Technology Assessments, PubMed, Campbell Collaboration, Joanna Briggs Library, PsycINFO, Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL, Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). Reference searching, Google Scholar, Grey Matters, IOSH and expert contacts will be used to identify grey literature. Two reviewers will screen title and abstracts, aiming for 95% agreement, and then independently screen full texts for inclusion. Two reviewers will assess methodological quality of included studies using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool, and extract and synthesize data in line with the RE-AIM framework, Nielson and Randall’s model of organisational-level interventions and Moore’s sustainability criteria, if the data allows. We will recruit and consult with international experts in the field to ensure engagement, reach and relevance of the main findings. Discussion: This will be the first systematic scoping review to identify and synthesise evidence of barriers and facilitators to implementing mental health promotion interventions in workplace settings. Our results will inform future evaluation studies and randomised controlled trials and highlight gaps in the evidence base.
Background Mental health problems are common in the working population and represent a growing concern internationally, with potential impacts on workers, organisations, workplace health and compensation authorities, labour markets and social policies. Workplace interventions that create workplaces supportive of mental health, promote mental health awareness, destigmatise mental illness and support those with mental disorders are likely to improve health and economical outcomes for employees and organisations. Identifying factors associated with successful implementation of these interventions can improve intervention quality and evaluation, and facilitate the uptake and expansion. Therefore, we aim to review research reporting on the implementation of mental health promotion interventions delivered in workplace settings, in order to increase understanding of factors influencing successful delivery. Methods and analysis A scoping review will be conducted incorporating a stepwise methodology to identify relevant literature reviews, primary research and grey literature. This review is registered with Research Registry (reviewregistry897). One reviewer will conduct the search to identify English language studies in the following electronic databases from 2008 through to July 1, 2020: Scopus, PROSPERO, Health Technology Assessments, PubMed, Campbell Collaboration, Joanna Briggs Library, PsycINFO, Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL and Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). Reference searching, Google Scholar, Grey Matters, IOSH and expert contacts will be used to identify grey literature. Two reviewers will screen title and abstracts, aiming for 95% agreement, and then independently screen full texts for inclusion. Two reviewers will assess methodological quality of included studies using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and extract and synthesize data in line with the RE-AIM framework, Nielson and Randall’s model of organisational-level interventions and Moore’s sustainability criteria, if the data allows. We will recruit and consult with international experts in the field to ensure engagement, reach and relevance of the main findings. Discussion This will be the first systematic scoping review to identify and synthesise evidence of barriers and facilitators to implementing mental health promotion interventions in workplace settings. Our results will inform future evaluation studies and randomised controlled trials and highlight gaps in the evidence base. Systematic review registration Research Registry ( reviewregistry897 )
Background: Mental health problems are common in the working population and represent a growing concern internationally, with potential impacts on workers, organisations, workplace health and compensation authorities, labour markets and social policies. Workplace interventions that create mental health-supportive workplaces, promote mental health awareness, destigmatise mental illness and support those with mental disorders are likely to improve health and economical outcomes for employees and organisations. Identifying factors associated with successful implementation of these interventions can improve their quality and evaluation and facilitate the uptake and expansion. Therefore, we aim to review research reporting on the implementation of mental health promotion interventions delivered in workplace settings, in order to increase understanding of factors influencing successful delivery. Methods and analysis: A scoping review will be conducted incorporating a stepwise methodology to identify relevant literature reviews, primary research and grey literature. This review is registered with Review Registry (reviewregistry897). One reviewer will conduct the search to identify English language studies in the following electronic databases from 2008 through to July 1, 2020: Scopus, PROSPERO, Health Technology Assessments, PubMed, Campbell Collaboration, Joanna Briggs Library, PsycINFO, Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL, Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). Reference searching, Google Scholar, Grey Matters, IOSH and expert contacts will be used to identify grey literature. Two reviewers will screen title and abstracts, aiming for 95% agreement, and then independently screen full texts for inclusion. Two reviewers will assess methodological quality of included studies using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool, and extract and synthesize data in line with the RE-AIM framework, Nielson and Randall’s model of organisational-level interventions and Moore’s sustainability criteria, if the data allows. We will recruit and consult with international experts in the field to ensure engagement, reach and relevance of the main findings. Discussion: This will be the first systematic scoping review to identify and synthesise evidence of barriers and facilitators to implementing mental health promotion interventions in workplace settings. Our results will inform future evaluation studies and randomised controlled trials and highlight gaps in the evidence base. Registration: reviewregistry897
Kahar Abdulla
added an update
After more than one year of outstanding teamwork and dedicated design of the MENTUPP multilevel intervention, the online platform MENTUPP HUB which lies at the heart of this project is ready to be tested with the Pilot Study starting in May 2021.
MENTUPP is a four-year project involving 17 partners in Europe and Australia. The consortium includes a wide range of disciplines, aimed at developing an intervention programme that can be successfully implemented by SMEs, targeting construction, healthcare and ICT sectors in particular.
For more information please see the project website (https://www.mentuppproject.eu/), follow on Twitter (https://twitter.com/eu_mentupp), LinkedIn (https://ie.linkedin.com/showcase/mentuppeu), or send an email to mentupp@eaad.net.
 
Kahar Abdulla
added an update
As part of the MENTUPP Project, a new systematic scoping review protocol was published in the journal Systematic Reviews in January 2021.
Mental health problems are common in the working population and represent a growing concern internationally, with potential impacts on workers, organisations, workplace health and compensation authorities, labour markets and social policies. The aim of this systematic scoping review will be to review research reporting on the implementation of mental health promotion interventions delivered in workplace settings, in order to increase understanding of factors influencing successful delivery.
A scoping review will be conducted incorporating a stepwise methodology to identify relevant literature reviews, primary research and grey literature. This will be the first systematic scoping review to identify and synthesise evidence of barriers and facilitators to implementing mental health promotion interventions in workplace settings. The results will inform future evaluation studies and randomised controlled trials and highlight gaps in the evidence base.
Cite this article:
Paterson, C., Leduc, C., Maxwell, M., Aust, B., Amann, B. L., Cerga-Pashoja, A., ... & Greiner, B. A. (2021). Evidence for implementation of interventions to promote mental health in the workplace: a systematic scoping review protocol. Systematic reviews, 10(1), 1-8. doi:10.1186/s13643-020-01570-9
 
Ilinca Serbanescu
added a project goal
Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental health difficulties in the workplace in the EU, causing immense suffering and costing the global economy €1 trillion each year in lost productivity. Certain sectors, in particular construction sector, health sector, information and communication technology (ICT) sector, have an elevated risk of mental health difficulties, with those working in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) being particularly vulnerable. However, most SMEs have limited capacity to address mental health promotion and provide mental health interventions to the staff. As SMEs comprise more than 90% of all EU businesses, there is a huge potential to influence population health.
The MENTUPP project is a four-year project involving 17 partners in Europe and Australia, involving a wide range of disciplines that aimed at improving mental health and wellbeing in the workplace by developing, implementing and evaluating a comprehensive, multilevel intervention programme targeting both clinical (depressive, anxiety disorders) and non-clinical (stress, burnout, wellbeing, depressive symptoms) mental health issues, as well as combating the stigma of mental (ill-) health. The intervention will be tailored for SMEs in construction, healthcare and ICT sectors and will be assessed in a multi-country Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (CRCT). The primary goal is to improve mental health in the workplace, with a secondary goal to reduce depression and suicidal behaviour.