Archived project

Living Research x British Council: China

Goal: British Council delegation of makers and researchers for the Living Research project in China, which began with fieldwork in the cities of Chengdu in the province of Sichuan and Xi'an in the Shaanxi province, investigating the local circumstances of over 40 collective spaces for making, craft and design in both regions, from corporate design labs to open hardware factories and rural villages focused on maintaining intangible cultural heritage. Our first field study analysed the close relationship between maker cultures and government policy, and the makerspaces and technology spaces positioned as catalysts for economic transformation. In 2019, our research team was awarded a follow-on grant to return to Chengdu, where the circular economy model was being instituted through compulsory recycling laws for the first time, to explore how people enacted circularity in their daily lives. We facilitated participatory workshops and interviewed locals to explore the possibilities and limits of these new economic models with makers, crafters, designers, businesses and government officials.

Date: 1 January 2018 - 1 January 2020

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
0
Reads
0 new
2

Project log

Kit Kat Braybrooke
added a project goal
British Council delegation of makers and researchers for the Living Research project in China, which began with fieldwork in the cities of Chengdu in the province of Sichuan and Xi'an in the Shaanxi province, investigating the local circumstances of over 40 collective spaces for making, craft and design in both regions, from corporate design labs to open hardware factories and rural villages focused on maintaining intangible cultural heritage. Our first field study analysed the close relationship between maker cultures and government policy, and the makerspaces and technology spaces positioned as catalysts for economic transformation. In 2019, our research team was awarded a follow-on grant to return to Chengdu, where the circular economy model was being instituted through compulsory recycling laws for the first time, to explore how people enacted circularity in their daily lives. We facilitated participatory workshops and interviewed locals to explore the possibilities and limits of these new economic models with makers, crafters, designers, businesses and government officials.
 
Kit Kat Braybrooke
added a research item
In this chapter, we ask how distributive design models like the circular economy can assist makers and designers in articulating environmentally conscious action on their own terms, in ways that are personally meaningful for them. We discuss our fieldwork with creative practitioners in Chengdu, China, and offer a set of design recommendations for the aid of practitioners wishing to facilitate future hands-on workshops that explore complex systems in collaboration with creative communities. In doing so, we illustrate how economic policy frameworks can become distributive and regenerative by design (Raworth, 2017) and global in scope, while also remaining sensitive to local experiences, values and needs.