Project

Learning Sustainability

Goal: Produce a special issue of "Sustainable Earth", SpringerNature.
This interdisciplinary article collection focuses on the intersection of four main areas: Experiential learning, sustainability (including climate change), the Earth and ethics.

Learning is a relatively new concern in sustainability. Much attention has been given to sustainability education, especially in tertiary education, but rather less on how people learn about sustainability and learn to become sustainable, especially from experience.

Sustainability has traditionally been defined with three pillars: social, environmental, economic. We seem to have forgotten a fourth pillar, learning, without which none of the other three could ever constitute a solid element in sustainability.

The objective of this article collection is to examine and improve the learning of sustainability; it is to build, as it were, a fully sustainable concept of sustainability. It is to develop and broaden the realization that learning is a crucial component of sustainability and to make explicit the practice of learning in sustainability for sustainability. If the world (people, institutions, education, science, organizations, professional associations, research, industry, governments, etc.) pays insufficient attention to this pillar of learning, then sustainability will at best simply hobble along, at worst wither and even die, taking humanity with it.

We wish to examine how people and communities typically learn about sustainability, learn to become and be sustainable, learn to help others learn, learn about helping others learn, sustainability. We wish to examine, make explicit and improve what it is to learn sustainability – as a way of life, as second nature, just as we learn language, culture and maths, often from direct or vicarious experience.

We welcome articles from ordinary citizens, scientists, trainers, citizen scientists and learners, especially those who have learned from their experience of the Earth (e.g., through floods, adventure, tsunamis, exploration, earthquakes, field work, rescue missions, professional work, disasters, organizational work, travel, etc). A wide range of structured experiential learning types is relevant, such as debriefing, simulations, Companion Modelling, role-play, internships, field trips, games, museums, school outings, activism, voluntary work, conferences, project work, etc.

Key themes:
• Learning and sustainability
• Experience and learning for a sustainable Earth
• Experiential learning for sustainability
• Ethical dimensions of experiential learning for sustainability
• Processing experience of the Earth to turn it into learning sustainability

Please consider submitting an article proposal if you:
• Are a sustainability or climate change workshop facilitator;
• Are concerned or even passionate about making the Earth sustainable;
• Are learning, or helping others to learn, about sustainability;
• Consider that experience is an important way in which people learn sustainability;
• Consider ethics to be important in learning (about) sustainability;
• Are an environmental educator, using participatory learning methods;
• Have a story to tell about helping the Earth to become more sustainable; or
• Would like to share your own learning experience in sustainability.

https://e4l-jrnl.weebly.com/cfp-se-long.html
https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/ls

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Project log

David Crookall
added 2 research items
There is a tendency among both designers and facilitators to become fixed, perhaps even fixated, on our simulations and games. Making and using systems that, at least to us as experts, clearly demonstrate some concept or skill in action is exciting. But, what about for the students? What do they, as non-experts, get out of their experience? How do we as teachers know what they got from the experience? What if what they got is not what we were wanting them to learn? What do we do then? (Leigh & Tipton, 2014) Students need to compare the simplified model of the simulation/game back to reality in order to transfer the competencies gained to the real situation. (Kriz, 2003) For real learning to happen, we must debrief and we need to do it well. To quote Prof.Dr. Stephan Rometsch: "A game is like a tasty meal in your mouth. The debriefing is digesting and absorbing nutrition" (Crookall, 2014). This workshop will help its participants to gain insight, confidence, and skill in both developing and conducting debriefing sessions that help the simulation/game participants process their experiences into real learning. It lasts five hours.
"Activities that can be used with learners to help them recognize and deal with language-learning anxiety are proposed, as well as some other activities that can be used with teachers in training to encourage them to respond effectively to learners' anxiety. Changes in classroom roles and procedures that serve to reduce anxiety are discussed. The advantages of addressing learner anxiety in an explicit and purposeful way are examined. Specific activities for language learners and for teachers in training are then described. The activities include games, simulations, and role-playing." (NCLEA)
David Crookall
added an update
Article proposals received are provided here:
Please feel free to submit a proposal for an article.
 
David Crookall
added 2 research items
Global network simulation. Global awareness. Computer-assisted simulation. Cross-cultural communication. Sustainable development. UN Conference on the Law of the Sea. Ocean resources. Network gaming. Project ICONS (International Dimension in Education via Active Learning and Simulation), Project ICONS. Briefing, simulation, debriefing.
Interdisciplinary nature of simulation/gaming. Touches on: Interdisciplinary education, humanistic education, types of interdisciplinarity, cross-disciplinarity, multidisciplinarity. Spirit of interdisciplinarity. Curricula. Rhetoric & action. Grassroots. Openness. Unification of knowledge. Simulation/gaming as a forum for the meshing of several disciplines. Simulation/gaming helps people to communicate across disciplinary borders. History of interdisciplinarity in simulation/gaming.
David Crookall
added a project reference
David Crookall
added an update
Learning Sustainability: Earth, Experience, Ethics
The CfP has been updated.
 
David Crookall
added an update
Learning Sustainability: Earth, Experience, Ethics​
The main CfP has been updated, and new pages added.
 
David Crookall
added a project goal
Produce a special issue of "Sustainable Earth", SpringerNature.
This interdisciplinary article collection focuses on the intersection of four main areas: Experiential learning, sustainability (including climate change), the Earth and ethics.
Learning is a relatively new concern in sustainability. Much attention has been given to sustainability education, especially in tertiary education, but rather less on how people learn about sustainability and learn to become sustainable, especially from experience.
Sustainability has traditionally been defined with three pillars: social, environmental, economic. We seem to have forgotten a fourth pillar, learning, without which none of the other three could ever constitute a solid element in sustainability.
The objective of this article collection is to examine and improve the learning of sustainability; it is to build, as it were, a fully sustainable concept of sustainability. It is to develop and broaden the realization that learning is a crucial component of sustainability and to make explicit the practice of learning in sustainability for sustainability. If the world (people, institutions, education, science, organizations, professional associations, research, industry, governments, etc.) pays insufficient attention to this pillar of learning, then sustainability will at best simply hobble along, at worst wither and even die, taking humanity with it.
We wish to examine how people and communities typically learn about sustainability, learn to become and be sustainable, learn to help others learn, learn about helping others learn, sustainability. We wish to examine, make explicit and improve what it is to learn sustainability – as a way of life, as second nature, just as we learn language, culture and maths, often from direct or vicarious experience.
We welcome articles from ordinary citizens, scientists, trainers, citizen scientists and learners, especially those who have learned from their experience of the Earth (e.g., through floods, adventure, tsunamis, exploration, earthquakes, field work, rescue missions, professional work, disasters, organizational work, travel, etc). A wide range of structured experiential learning types is relevant, such as debriefing, simulations, Companion Modelling, role-play, internships, field trips, games, museums, school outings, activism, voluntary work, conferences, project work, etc.
Key themes:
• Learning and sustainability
• Experience and learning for a sustainable Earth
• Experiential learning for sustainability
• Ethical dimensions of experiential learning for sustainability
• Processing experience of the Earth to turn it into learning sustainability
Please consider submitting an article proposal if you:
• Are a sustainability or climate change workshop facilitator;
• Are concerned or even passionate about making the Earth sustainable;
• Are learning, or helping others to learn, about sustainability;
• Consider that experience is an important way in which people learn sustainability;
• Consider ethics to be important in learning (about) sustainability;
• Are an environmental educator, using participatory learning methods;
• Have a story to tell about helping the Earth to become more sustainable; or
• Would like to share your own learning experience in sustainability.