Project

LIFT: Low-Input Farming and Territories – Integrating knowledge for improving ecosystem-based farming (H2020 Project)

Goal: LIFT is a research project (2018-2022) aiming to identify and understand how socio-economic and policy drivers impact on the development of ecological approaches to farming and assess the performance and sustainability of such approaches, taking into account different farming systems at farm, farm-group and territorial scales.

Coordinated by INRAE (French National Institute for Research on Agriculture, Food and the Environment, www.inrae.fr) the consortium includes 17 partners from 12 countries. Further information can be found on the project website: www.lift-h2020.eu.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No 770747.

Date: 1 May 2018 - 30 April 2022

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Gordana Manevska-Tasevska
added a research item
Delivering an agricultural policy which meets ecosystem and climatic pressures and addresses weaknesses in our current food system presents complex challenges for food producers. Adoption of ecological practices will reduce the dependence on imports into the farm and is one way to meet some of these policy ambitions. Understanding why farmers do or don’t adopt these practices is key to enabling this transition. This study outlines a series of investigations into the key barriers, values and perceptions towards ecological practice adoption across European farming. We find that personal, technical and institutional forces influence the adoption of more sustainable practices but these forces have varying levels of influence. The tensions between environmental, compared to purely production orientated motivations, may be a key barrier to ecological practice adoption. We also find a strong influence of commodity supply chains which may either encourage or limit adoption of these approaches. Promoting efforts for co‐ordinated approaches between the public and private sectors may mitigate some of the dissonance in messaging towards these practices and alleviate these tensions. We also identify a great deal of heterogeneity within the European farming community and argue for a more targeted approach that would encourage adoption of ecological approaches and promote the scaling up of these practices. La mise en place d'une politique agricole qui réponde aux pressions écosystémiques et climatiques et remédie aux faiblesses de notre système alimentaire actuel présente des défis complexes pour les producteurs de denrées alimentaires. L'adoption de pratiques écologiques réduira la dépendance vis‐à‐vis des importations dans l’exploitation agricole et constitue un moyen de répondre à certaines des ambitions de la politique. Pour permettre cette transition, il est essentiel de comprendre pourquoi les agriculteurs adoptent ou non ces pratiques. Cette étude présente une série d'enquêtes sur les principaux obstacles, valeurs et perceptions liés à l'adoption de pratiques écologiques dans l'agriculture européenne. Nous constatons que les facteurs personnels, techniques et institutionnels influencent l'adoption de pratiques plus durables, mais leurs niveaux d'influence sont variables. Les tensions entre les motivations environnementales et celles purement axées sur la production peuvent constituer un obstacle majeur à l'adoption de pratiques écologiques. Nous constatons également une forte influence des chaînes d'approvisionnement en produits de base qui peuvent soit encourager, soit limiter l'adoption de ces approches. Promouvoir des efforts pour des approches coordonnées entre les secteurs public et privé peut atténuer une partie de la dissonance dans les messages à l'égard de ces pratiques et atténuer ces tensions. Nous identifions également une grande hétérogénéité au sein de la communauté agricole européenne et plaidons pour une approche plus ciblée qui encouragerait l'adoption d'approches écologiques et favoriserait le renforcement de ces pratiques. Die Umsetzung einer Agrarpolitik, die den Anforderungen an Ökosysteme und das Klima gerecht wird und gleichzeitig die Schwächen unseres derzeitigen Lebensmittelsystems behebt, stellt die Erzeuger und Erzeugerinnen von Lebensmitteln vor große Herausforderungen. Die Anwendung ökologischer Wirtschaftsweisen wird die Importabhängigkeit landwirtschaftlicher Betriebe verringern und ist eine Möglichkeit, um einen Teil der politischen Ziele zu erreichen. Von großer Bedeutung für diesen Übergang ist das Verständnis darüber, warum Landwirte und Landwirtinnen die Wirtschaftsweise anwenden oder nicht. In der vorliegenden Studie wird eine Reihe von Untersuchungen zu den wesentlichen Hindernissen, Werten und Wahrnehmungen in Bezug auf die Einführung ökologischer Wirtschaftsweisen in der europäischen Landwirtschaft vorgestellt. Unsere Ergebnisse zeigen, dass persönliche, technische und institutionelle Faktoren die Einführung nachhaltigerer Wirtschaftsweisen beeinflussen. Allerdings sind diese Faktoren unterschiedlich stark ausgeprägt. Das Spannungsverhältnis zwischen umwelt‐ und ausschließlich produktionsorientierten Beweggründen kann ein wesentliches Hindernis für die Anwendung ökologischer Wirtschaftsweisen sein. Wir stellen auch einen starken Einfluss der Warenketten fest, da sie förderlich oder einschränkend wirken können. Bemühungen zur Förderung koordinierter Ansätze zwischen dem öffentlichen und dem privaten Sektor könnten einen Teil der Dissonanzen in der Kommunikation mildern und Spannungsverhältnisse abbauen. Wir identifizieren auch eine große Heterogenität innerhalb der europäischen Landwirtschaft und plädieren für einen gezielteren Ansatz, der die Anwendung ökologischer Wirtschaftsweisen und ihre Verbreitung fördern würde.
Mihai Alexandru Chitea
added 2 research items
The territory, defined as a space forged by history, culture, social relations and structures, is placed in a multiple correlation relation with ecological agriculture. The territorial development is determined, as tendency and content, by the nature of agricultural practices, and, in its turn, generates the favorable frames for using and amplifying the methods specific to ecological agriculture. The aim of this study is to identify, at the subjective ecology level, the meeting points, both for the ecological agriculture and for territorial development. In this paper, the approach to ecological subjectivity was based on Q methodology, which is both a qualitative and statistical research method. The study was conducted in Dornelor Basin, Suceava county, an area characterized by ecological concerns and farming practices, and it identified four major types of subjective configurations built on the basis of the impact of adopting environment-friendly farming practices on the territorial development.
If we can decipher the content of opinions and evaluations of those involved in ecological agriculture then we could know the subjective fundamentals/resorts of the modernization and ecological development's process at the level of the rural communities. The study mainly aims at identifying the opinions on the ecological farm's evolutions, and, as general objectives: knowing the projections regarding employment in ecological farm, employment in agriculture's support services, determining the way in which the consequences of using ecological practices on the supply chain and impact on rural communities are perceived. The scientific approach on the ecological subjectivity has turned to a structured communication method, Delphi, in three stages. The study was implemented in a rural area defined by concernments and ecological agricultural activities-Dornelor Basin, Suceava county and it has identified the content, persistence, flexibility and statements' meaning (positive/negative) of opinions regarding the future of the ecological farms.
Etienne Polge
added a research item
CONTEXT The social network analysis of farmers who have adopted agroecological practices give the possibility to identify which actors are involved in the agroecological transition and are influencing the resilience at territorial level. OBJECTIVE To understand the dynamics of these interactions, we built and tested an analytical framework inspired by quantified narrations approach adapted to agricultural context. We combined social sequences analysis (identification of common phases within individual trajectories and typology of sequences) and relational chains analysis that is a specific approach within social networks analysis focusing on the mode of access to resources. METHOD We applied our analytical framework to study the modes of access to resources mobilized by farmers to adopt agroecological practices in the Limagne plain of the Puy-de-Dôme county in France . We conducted 31 face-to-face interviews with 22 farmers in organic agriculture and 9 farmers in conservation agriculture. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS The results show that our approach gives the possibility to identify a large range of actors beyond the commonly pre-identified actors and to analyse their specific roles depending on the phase of the transition. The farmers in conservation agriculture mobilize mainly interpersonal relationships prior to the adoption of practices and have little support at the time of the implementation of conservation agriculture practices while the organic farmers rely more on farmers' groups and on formalized arrangements with support organizations and downstream actors. SIGNIFICANCE The framework should be a useful way to identify in all agricultural systems the actors effectively implicated in the agroecological transition, their differentiated roles, and the support needed to improve the transition.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT Fourth Annual Newsletter is available in 10 European languages:
Inside each newsletter:
📷 Latest project achievements with emphasis on scientific & practical outcomes
📷 Achieved LIFT deliverables and publications
📷 Stakeholder interactions
📷 Project’s practical tools
📷 Cooperation with other projects
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT Policy Brief presents key project findings in the form of policy recommendations, aimed to increase the uptake of ecological approaches in European farming. Key sections consequtively reveal policy and market context of these findings, main implications for agricultural, food and environmental policy, suggested policy designs for the development of ecological agriculture, role of different stakeholders and actors in the development of ecological agriculture, policy and information support.
In order for agroecology to be impactful it needs to become ‘mainstream’. This requires an ecological transition of the whole European farming sector, covering not only farms in specific contexts already open for such change, but also standard farms. The analyses and tools developed in the LIFT project inform policy makers whether ecological farms perform differently and have different trade-offs and synergies than standard farms. While this is an important step, targeted policies, further research and further development of data bases in this direction are needed to realise a broad adoption of agroecology in Europe.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
This report is an aggregate presentation of key LIFT research assumptions and findings, generated within the four years of the project's duration. The LIFT project’s objective was to contribute to knowledge on the development of ecological agriculture, the latter being understood as a broad range of farming systems, in Europe. Based on numerous analyses targeting different issues and levels, a mix of methodologies, secondary and primary data, and a strong involvement of stakeholders, the research activities carried out in the LIFT project showed that there is a strong potential to develop ecological farming on a large scale in Europe, and highlighted several key areas to be addressed by policies and future research.
In order for agroecology or other ecological farming systems to be impactful, they need to become ‘mainstream’. This requires an ecological transition of the whole European farming sector, covering not only farms in specific contexts already open for such change, but also standard farms. The analyses and tools developed in LIFT inform policy-makers whether ecological farms perform differently and have different trade-offs and synergies than standard farms. While this is an important step, further targeted policies, further research and further development of databases in this direction are needed to realise broad adoption of agroecology in Europe.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
D5.3 of the LIFT project we present a framework which evaluates the overall sustainability performance by incorporating farm and territorial level. The framework considers the sustainability along the economic, social and environmental dimensions. Matches and mismatches between the two spatial levels are considered by weighting farm level performance across said three dimensions. Weights are context-specific and reflect the importance of each dimension at the territorial level. Further, by evaluating sustainability performance across three different dimensions we are able to assess the synergies and trade-offs that exist between each and consider how these drive overall sustainability performance. The framework may also be used to inform policy decision-making by identifying which farming approaches are most sustainable within a particular case study area, and by identifying areas of focus to increase adoption rates of said systems.
The deliverable includes three components. First, we provide a brief overview of the literature on sustainability performance assessments and position the present framework within it. Following this we provide a detailed explanation of how the framework is constructed, highlighting the input data used. Second, we apply the framework to five LIFT case study areas, namely Flanders (Belgium), Austria, Romania, the United Kingdom and France. Here we detail the process of applying the data and discuss the results and how these can be interpreted. We also demonstrate how these results can be linked to drivers of change to help inform policy decision-making and identify target areas for increasing adoption of sustainable farming approaches. Finally, we provide insights into the assumptions that underpin the framework, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of the proposed approach. We also provide insights and point of consideration for future application of the framework.
The framework incorporates stakeholder’s sustainability objectives, multicriteria analysis, secondary data from the Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) database, and further descriptive analysis to present an innovative multi-dimensional and multi-scale approach to evaluating farming approach sustainability performance. Though the framework has been developed within the LIFT project, it is highly flexible and can easily be adopted by interested parties outside of the LIFT project.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
This Deliverable 5.2 of the LIFT project presents a territorial level sustainability assessment of alternative scenarios for the adoption of ecological farming approaches for 16 case study areas across Europe.
In order to define the sustainability objectives for assessment, an initial long list of possible objectives was created through a review of the academic literature and relevant regional policy documents, followed by a round of stakeholder consultation to produce a final short list of objectives for each case study area. Performance against these objectives was assessed for four ecological farming adoption scenarios that differed in terms of the rate (either high or low) and distribution (clustered or dispersed) of adoption in 10 years’ time. The ecological practices being adopted in these scenarios were identified based on the output of Delphi exercises with stakeholder panels for each case study area, conducted as part of previous research in LIFT.
Drawing on results from LIFT, local literature, and expert knowledge, each scenario was described as the product of a set of drivers of change. The drivers of change were tabulated against the objectives to produce an assessment matrix for each scenario. Groups of experts and stakeholders completed these matrices by deciding whether the state of each driver in each scenario had a positive or negative, strong or weak, impact on each objective. The different driver impacts on each objective were aggregated to show the scenario’s overall performance against each objective. For the High Weald case study area in England, the assessment matrices were also used to create network graphs to show the interacting cause-effect relationships between drivers and impacts, and network analysis was used to identify features of the system that were especially influential in determining overall sustainability performance.
Based on this qualitative mapping of impacts against sustainability objectives, across case study areas, territorial sustainability performance was assessed to be strongest when the ecological farming adoption rate was high, and when adoption occurred in a clustered distribution (although the impact of adoption distribution was typically smaller than the impact of adoption rate). The same overall pattern was also reported when considering only the environmental and social dimensions of sustainability, but economic sustainability performance was only impacted by the rate, and typically not the distribution, of adoption.
These results suggest that the practices identified by stakeholders as relevant to future ecological adoption scenarios for a given case study area tend to be appropriate for achieving the area’s specific sustainability objectives, and that the spread of ecological farming approaches, at least in some areas, has the potential to deliver ‘win-win-win’ outcomes that reconcile performance across different sustainability dimensions. However, no one scenario was best for every objective in a case study area, so even if high clustered adoption of ecological farming makes an overall positive contribution to sustainability at the territorial level, realising this scenario in practice will still involve navigating some trade-offs between objectives.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
In the analysis we develop a novel indicator system, which combines the LIFT farm typology and farm performance data, covering all sustainability dimensions. The approach compares performance of farms in five ecological groups (referred to as ecological farming approaches or ecological farming systems) from the LIFT farm typology (Conservation Agriculture, Low-Input farming, Integrated/Circular farming, Organic farming, Agroecology) as well as possible combinations of these groups with a less ecological group, referred to as Standard farming. This allows us to depict whether ecological farms perform differently or have different trade-offs and synergies than standard farms. Based on this system, we carry out a farm sustainability performance assessment with the two main data sources in the LIFT project, namely Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) data and data from the LIFT large-scale farmer survey, covering main farm types present in the European Union (EU) in several case study regions/countries. Additionally, we present in-depth analyses of further specific aspects, namely (i) the extension of the developed indicator framework to bio-economic models, (ii) the integration of the consumption and provision of ecosystem services into the developed indicator system through composite agri-environmental performance (AEP) indicators, derived from the body of secondary literature and region-specific stakeholder input, and (iii) working conditions and employment on farms in the context of an ecological transition.
 
Aude Ridier
added a research item
The economic performance of organic dairy farms, especially during the transitional period, is not consensus in economics studies, depending on the method used, the type of indicators, the nature and scale of the performance indicator, the geographical location. We compare the economic and financial performance of both conventional and organic dairy farms based on a mixed effect panel data model estimated on 1,016 farm micro-data collected between 2007and 2018 in two departments of Brittany. As in other studies, we find that the herd size influences positively all economic and financial indicators. Even if the growth in assets is heterogeneous among organic farms, it is higher than in other farms, which decreases their return on assets. Finally, even if they share the same objective of food autonomy and sparing variable expenses, dairy farms based on grassland production system don’t exhibit the same performance dynamics as organic farms
Matteo Zavalloni
added a research item
Agglomeration bonus schemes are envisioned to incentivize the connectivity of habitat conservation across landowners. Assuming full cooperation among landowners at the landscape scale, the bulk of the literature theoretically finds that agglomeration bonus schemes are more cost effective in achieving biodiversity conservation than spatially homogenous payments. However, it may be rational for landowners not to cooperate all together but, rather, to cooperate within smaller groups. Here, we analyze the cost effectiveness of agglomeration bonus schemes when such partial cooperation is allowed, that is, when cooperation is endogenously chosen. We introduce a spatially explicit ecological-economic model within a coalition formation game to assess how landowners form stable coalition structures and how this affects biodiversity conservation under a wide range of (i) degrees of spatial cost autocorrelation, (ii) bonuses and flat-rate payments, (iii) species dispersal rates, and (iv) coordination costs. We find that agglomeration bonus schemes are more cost effective than homogenous payments only for low public expenditures. This condition is not identified if full cooperation is assumed. We find, however, that full cooperation never emerges and hence that such an assumption leads to an overestimation of the cost effectiveness of agglomeration bonus schemes. Moreover, we find that the cost effectiveness of agglomeration bonus schemes increases when the spatial cost autocorrelation and species dispersal rate decrease. Finally, coordination costs do not affect the cost effectiveness of the agglomeration bonus scheme but they have implications for its design because of their impact on coalition formation.
Shailesh Shrestha
added a research item
An early adoption of ecological management practices by farmers is a potential route to achieve sustainable and greener goals for agriculture. This briefing note outlines an economic assessment of four different ecological practices on Scottish livestock farms. The ecological practices used are; ecological area, reducing farm inputs, organic adoption and agro-forestry. The results suggest that ecological area and reduced farm inputs have potential financial benefits on farms and can be easily adopted by farmers. The organic and agro-forestry systems, however, require capital investment to establish and hence provide a challenging prospect of adoption without a provision of financial support .
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
New article has been published: "Farmer intentional pathways for net zero carbon: Exploring the lock-in effects of forestry and renewables" by A.P. Barnes, J. McMillan, L.-A. Sutherland, J. Hopkins, and S.G. Thomson. Land Use Policy Journal, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2021.105861.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
This briefing note outlines the results of a survey of Scottish farmers on their attitudes and perspectives towards ecological practices. It is part of the EU funded LIFT project looking at farming across Europe. We compare Scottish farmer perceptions to those of counterpart farmers in mainland Europe. This allows us to identify whether there are stronger or weaker levels of agreement towards these statements and whether they are significantly different from a mainland European perspective.
Authors: Andrew Barnes, Bethan Thompson, Luiza Toma, Joana Ferreira, Shailesh Shrestha
 
Gordana Manevska-Tasevska
added a research item
Currently, farmers who are not certified according to organic certification schemes are considered to be conventional farmers. Discussions in the farming sector reveal a view that the current organic classification system is too narrow and does not account for the full heterogeneity of the ecological practices that are prevalent in the agricultural sector. The failure to recognise practices within conventional farming, such as low-input farming or conservation agriculture, may therefore undermine efforts to adopt ecological practices. This study investigates heterogeneity in farmer uptake of management practices using factor analysis for dimension reduction and Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) for identification of farmer segments. The findings reveal four farmer profiles with a varying degree of use of chemicals and ecological, alternative, or mixed management approaches. Using seemingly unrelated regression, we find that being certified according to the Swedish organic certification scheme KRAV, or the EU organic label, does not have an impact on a farmer's profile, suggesting that the data do not support the organic/conventional dichotomy. Instead, age, farming income and geographical location are to a greater degree the key factors in determining the larger farmer profile compared with the smaller, more diversified farmer profiles.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
This briefing note outlines the results of a survey of Scottish farmers on agroecological practices. It is part of an EU Horizon 2020 project so compares Scottish adoption with a concurrent sample of EU farmers. It highlights which practices Scottish farmers promote within their farming systems and where there is scope to do more relative to their EU counterparts. This allows us to understand the potential for a transition to a more agroecological system and start to identify barriers and opportunities for adoption of these approaches in Scottish farming.
 
Julie Duval
added 2 research items
Concerns for the future of the French livestock sector are growing, amongst others due to the profession’ low attractiveness which is partly related to its difficult working conditions. Agroecology in its search for social sustainability could offer better working conditions to farmers. The objectives of this study are; i) to understand whether expected changes in working conditions are taken into consideration when cattle farmers decide to adopt or not agroecological practices, ii) to study the impact of these practices on their working conditions and ii) to discuss the use of a multidimensional framework to study farmers’ working conditions. A framework addressing seven dimensions known to impact farmers’ working conditions was used to interview 22 French cattle farmers adopting agroecological practices. Improving working conditions was rarely the main motivation of farmers to adopt agroecological practices. Although never completely anticipated, all farmers experienced an impact of the adoption of agroecological practices on their working conditions (e.g. changes in work organization, health or pleasure derived from work). Across farms, all dimensions were impacted but consequences on working conditions were situation specific. The framework allowed a comprehensive understanding, from farmers’ point of view, on how working conditions are constituted and showed that farmers make trade-offs between different dimensions.
Gordana Manevska-Tasevska
added a research item
Ecological approaches to farming are gaining increasing interest in the EU's Rural Development (RD) policy. From a societal perspective, these approaches are expected to deliver public goods in terms of environmental and social benefits for both consumers and rural actors. This study aims to investigate the policy discourses that are being used in the Rural Development Programmes (RDPs) of Sweden, France, Bavaria, Hungary, Poland and Romania to depict and justify the support for ecological approaches across three programming periods of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). For this purpose, a model integrating both CAP and RD discourses was developed and applied using deductive content analysis focused on the policy documents of RDPs. The results suggest that during the entire CAP period from 2000 to 2020, ecological approaches were mainly justified in a multifunctionality discourse, especially with the two RD discourses of i) nature conservation in all considered EU member states and regions, with the exception of Sweden, and ii) agri-ruralism, including Sweden. The neomercantilist discourse appears to be the third most dominant discourse in the two most recent CAP periods from 2007 to 2013 and 2014–2020, becoming more prominent between these two periods. Ecological approaches are almost never advocated along liberal lines as the neo-liberalist discourse is almost absent. These results highlight that these six EU member states and regions recognize the potential of these approaches for delivering public goods, despite a lesser emphasis on socio-economic benefits.
Nathalie Hostiou
added a research item
This technical report is about the analysis of farmers' social performances conducted in the WP33 of LIFT project. A comparative analysis across 5 European case studies was done on farmers' working conditions in livestock and crops farms.
Vitaliy Krupin
added a research item
This document presents the results of Task 3.2 (farm technical-economic performance) in workpackage (WP) 3 (farm performance of ecological agriculture) of the LIFT project. The overall aim of Task 3.2 is to assess and compare technical-economic farm performance across the European Union (EU) depending on the degree of ecological approaches adopted by farms and analyse drivers, affecting their performance.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT achieved 7 goals in the past days - 7 new public deliverables were finalised. Please find below the links to the new reports:
D1.4. LIFT farm typology developed, tested and revised, and recommendations on data needs (type: public report, lead partner: JRC) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2305,
D2.3. Drivers of adoption of ecological approaches (type: public report, lead partner: SRUC) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2310,
D3.1. Farm technical-economic performance depending on the degree of ecological approaches (type: public report, lead partner: BOKU) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2313,
D3.2. Farmer private social performance depending on the degree of ecological approaches (type: public report, lead partner: VetAgro Sup) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2316,
D3.3. Farm environmental performance depending on the degree of ecological approaches (type: public report, lead partner: KU Leuven) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2319,
D3.4. Employment effect of ecological farming at the farm level (type: public report, lead partner: UNIKENT) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2322,
D4.2. Socio-economic impact of ecological agriculture at the territorial level (type: public report, lead partner: UNIKENT) - https://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/2325.
 
Mihai Alexandru Chitea
added a research item
The main objective of the paper is to identify and understand how the Romanian farmers relate to ecological farming in terms of ecological practices and ecological products. To achieve this objective, qualitative research methods were used: hybrid forum method and in-depth interviews. The obtained results reveal that in the county Cluj-Napoca, the stakeholders opt for building an operational social system (balanced functioning of the education, production, research, distribution systems within multi-dimensional political programmes/projects). At the same time, the stakeholders from Suceava opt for building an operational social system where the ecological practices are the core of agricultural systems.
Matteo Zavalloni
added a research item
A growing body of literature shows that full-cooperation among farmers to manage productive ecosystem services would yield gains with respect to uncoordinated approaches. The public good feature of these ecosystem services may, however, hinder the emergence of a cooperative solution at the landscape scale. In this paper, we introduce in a coalition formation game a spatially-explicit bioeconomic model of fruit pollination, where pollinaton depends on the distance to the choosen location of natural habitats. We analyse: (i) which coalitions are stable; (ii) what benefits they provide; (iii) how cooperation depends on the initial landscape structure; and (iv) how policy instruments affect cooperation. The theoretical model presents the rationality of cooperation but, due to the detailed heterogeneity and complex spatial interactions among farms, we use a numerical example to determine the stable coalitions. We find that only small coalitions are stable and that the benefits of cooperation decrease when the spatial autocorrelation of fruit tree covers increase. Policy instruments can increase the interest for cooperation but per-hectare payments and minimum participation rules may reduce the habitat area at the margin (by decreasing the stability of coalitions). Price premium for the coalition members increase the habitat area but its budget-effectiveness decreases as the spatial autocorrelation of fruit tree covers increase.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT Third Annual Newsletter is available in 10 European languages: Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, Romanian and Swedish.
The content of the newsletter delivers information covering the third year of the project, elaborating the current work progress and planned public deliverables. The newsletter provides information concerning published repord, carried out large-scale survey among European farmers, published scientific articles, as well as interactions with LIFT stakeholders within workshops and stakeholder platform. The newsletter’s content is intended to widen the audience eager to learn more about the LIFT research questions and become more involved in the field of ecological approaches, whether on the practical, policy or scientific level.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
The Institute for European Environmental Policy puts forward recommendations for ensuring that the next CAP is fit to support implementation of the EU's Green Deal in "What green ambitions of the CAP reform can still be salvaged?" available at https://cutt.ly/YxkMiZ4.
#CAP #GreenNewDeal #ecology
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT project has produced a package for the R software:
Dakpo KH., Desjeux Y. and Latruffe L. (2021). sfaR: Stochastic Frontier Analysis using R. R package version 0.0.91, available at https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=sfaR
#lifth2020 #H2020 #agriculture #farm #efficiency #productivity
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
A MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on Agroecology is available to everyone, no prerequisites or prior knowledge needed.
#MOOC #learn #agroecology
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
New article by Heinrichs J., Jouan J., Pahmeyer C. and Britz W. (2021) "Integrated assessment of legume production challenged by European policy interaction: A case-study approach from French and German dairy farms" is now available in open access: https://doi.org/10.1093/qopen/qoaa011
Legumes, which currently show low production levels in the European Union, can reduce negative environmental externalities of agricultural systems by lowering nitrogen (N) fertilization and increasing protein self-sufficiency. This has led to the introduction of coupled support in France, in contrast to Germany. However, the German implementation of the Nitrates Directive is more favorable for legumes. Our study assesses economic and environmental impacts of these two policies affecting legume production. We employ the bio-economic model FarmDyn, representing French and German dairy farms. The results suggest that relatively low levels of coupled support can lead to modest increases in legume production, but that more substantial changes require considerable subsidies. Allowing the French farm to apply manure on legumes, as is already possible in Germany, fosters legume production while considerably reducing the use of synthetic N fertilizer and imported protein-rich feed. However, environmental benefits are limited.
#h2020 #lifth2020 #Protein #crop, #Mathematical #programming, #Bioeconomic #model, #Leaching, #GWP, #Nitrates #Directive
 
Julia Jouan
added a research item
Legumes, which currently show low production levels in the European Union, can reduce negative environmental externalities of agricultural systems by lowering nitrogen (N) fertilization and increasing protein self-sufficiency. This has led to the introduction of coupled support in France, in contrast to Germany. However, the German implementation of the Nitrates Directive is more favorable for legumes. Our study assesses economic and environmental impacts of these two policies affecting legume production. We employ the bio-economic model FarmDyn, representing French and German dairy farms. The results suggest that relatively lowlevels of coupled support can lead to modest increases in legume production, but that more substantial changes require considerable subsidies. Allowing the French farm to apply manure on legumes, as is already possible in Germany, fosters legume production while considerably reducing the use of synthetic N fertilizer and imported protein-rich feed. However, environmental benefits are limited.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT Project would like to present another scientific article published by the project partners, which is available freely in open access:
Candemir Ahmet, Duvaleix Sabine, Latruffe Laure (2021). Agricultural cooperatives and farm sustainability – a literature review. Journal of Economic Surveys, https://doi.org/10.1111/joes.12417.
#lifth2020 #h2020 #farm #agriculture #sustainability #cooperative #cooperation
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
As the LIFT project (led by INRAE in cooperation with VetAgro Sup, Agrocampus Ouest, AgrosupDijon) has carried out its 3rd year workshops in France we would like to present our French stakeholders the reports with interesting findings.
Reports are available at https://bit.ly/2KJpoLW and https://bit.ly/3obrGRx (both in French language).
#lifth2020 #H2020 #agriculture #farm #ecological #organic #environment #sustainability
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
May this Christmas season bring you closer to all those that you treasure in your heart. Thank you for following the progress of our project. Hopefully the next year we can deliver as much new insights on the topic as possible!
The information on the work plan of the LIFT project for 2021 is available on our new blog: bit.ly/37NEbxT
Don't hesitate to take a look!!
#environment #sustainability #farming #ruraldevelopment #newblog #lifth2020 #ecological #approaches #merrychristmas
 
Julia Heinrichs
added a research item
Plot sizes and farm-plot distances affect the economic performance of agricultural production. Their economic effects likely differ between conventional and organic farming systems due to major differences in crop production programs. Our paper quantifies these effects based on big data on resource requirements of field operations, summarized by regression models. Combined with detailed case study information obtained through interviews, we assess plot size and farm-plot distance effects for three case study farms which recently converted to organic farming. Our results show for both farming systems, as expected, that larger plot sizes reduce labor requirements and costs associated with crop production while larger farm-plot distances increase them. At same plot sizes and farm-plot distances organic farms face lower costs in crop production and, at given market prices, higher profits. Cost savings from larger plot sizes are, however, higher in conventional farming systems as are cost increases from growing farm-plot distances. This implies that economic benefits of conversion are higher for farms managing smaller plots farther away from the farm. Land fragmentation might hence favor switching to organic production and motivate regionally differentiated subsidy rates.
Vitaliy Krupin
added a research item
Various drivers behind the adoption of environmentally friendly practices have been investigated at the farm level in the literature, e.g., farmers' motivations and attitudes, farms' structure, and management or policies. Yet, the way in which quality labels and producer organisations influence the adoption of environmentally friendly practices by farmers is still under-researched. We contribute to this topic and present the results of qualitative interviews with producer organisations, conducted in 2019 in two contrasting case studies: the pig sector in Brittany (western France), and the olive oil sector in Crete (Greece). Our study shows that economic actors of food supply chains in these two case studies use European quality labels, a couple of national schemes, and a proliferation of private quality labels (in Brittany's pig sector). Our interviews reveal that many quality labels, for which agricultural farming systems must comply with a set of rules, are not specifically aimed at improving environmental impacts. In the Cretan olive oil sector, we observe several European public labels. In the French pig sector, many quality labels do not include requirements for practices aiming at improving the environment, but instead focus on other practices that matter for society, namely improving animal welfare. However, advisory services provided by the producer organisations can play a key role in the adoption of environmentally friendly practices. They include research programmes and agronomic events. In Crete, producer organisations are able to offer technical assistance thanks to European support programmes.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
New LIFT publication:
Duvaleix, S.; Lassalas, M.; Latruffe, L.; Konstantidelli, V.; Tzouramani, I. Adopting Environmentally Friendly Farming Practices and the Role of Quality Labels and Producer Organisations: A Qualitative Analysis Based on Two European Case Studies. Sustainability 2020, 12, 10457. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410457
Various drivers behind the adoption of environmentally friendly practices have been investigated at the farm level in the literature, e.g., farmers’ motivations and attitudes, farms’ structure, and management or policies. We contribute to this topic and present the results of qualitative interviews with producer organisations, conducted in 2019 in two contrasting case studies: the pig sector in Brittany (western France), and the olive oil sector in Crete (Greece). Our study shows that economic actors of food supply chains in these two case studies use European quality labels, a couple of national schemes, and a proliferation of private quality labels (in Brittany’s pig sector). Our interviews reveal that many quality labels, for which agricultural farming systems must comply with a set of rules, are not specifically aimed at improving environmental impacts. In the Cretan olive oil sector, we observe several European public labels.
#lifth2020 #H2020 #agriculture #farm #ecological #organic #environment #sustainability
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT Second Annual Newsletter available in 10 European languages: Dutch, English, German, French, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, Romanian and Swedish.
The content of the newsletter delivers information covering the second year of the project with special emphasis on the achieved deliverables. Its purpose is to create interest towards stakeholders and the general public for them to obtain more information about the project and its results by visiting the LIFT website. The newsletter’s content is intended to widen the audience eager to learn more about the LIFT research questions and become more involved in the field of ecological approaches, whether on the practical, policy or scientific level.
If you would like to join LIFT mailing list – you can do that by filling out the form on Contacts page of the LIFT website (lift-h2020.eu) and receive LIFT project’s official newsletters and updates.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added a research item
With agricultural areas covering almost half of European land, proper management of agro-ecosystems is key to achieve the European Union’s environmental and climate objectives. This requires spatially explicit methods and indicators. We developed an approach for the classification of agricultural land by combining two main dimensions i) land cover, using detailed geo-spatialized census data covering 63 individual crops; ii) management intensity, measured as the anthropogenic energy required in the primary crop production. As a result we identified 10 main crop systems further classified into 30 ‘crop-management systems’ at a spatial resolution of 5 arcminutes. The resulting maps show the spatial patterns of agricultural management intensity across Europe, both in absolute terms (total energy input per hectare) and relative to the dominant crop system in the spatial unit of analysis. The use of multiple intensity dimensions provides new, more detailed insights on agricultural intensity by which areas that were previously classified as low-medium intensive - some permanent crops systems or irrigated arable land - appear now as highly intensive. An expert-based evaluation was carried out on the intensity maps and corroborated the obtained results. The generated maps can be used to support decision-making in designing more targeted, context-specific agricultural and territorial policies. In particular, findings can be relevant in the context of the Common Agricultural Policy post 2020 and the Biodiversity Strategy towards 2030, both of which will benefit from more detailed spatially explicit information to achieve their stated objectives.
Julia Heinrichs
added a research item
Legumes can limit the impact of agricultural systems on the environment by limiting N fertilization, diversifying crop rotation and substituting imported protein-rich feed. However, their production remains low in the European Union, which led to specific policies. France established Voluntary Coupled Support scheme for legumes. Germany did not introduce a coupled support, but provides more favorable implementation of the Nitrates Directive for legumes by allowing spreading manure on these crops. Our study assesses economic and environmental impacts of the coupled support and measures of the Nitrates Directive affecting legume production in France and Germany. We employ the bio-economic model FarmDyn, parameterized for a typical dairy farm in France and Germany. Legumes are introduced as cash crops and on-farm feed, highlighting interactions between crop and animal productions. Different levels of coupled support per hectare were analyzed and the French versus the German implementation of the Nitrates Directive were compared. Results suggest that voluntary coupled support leads to an increase in legume production but to a lesser extend in the German farm than in the French farm, due to higher opportunity costs of legumes. In both farms, the increase in legume production leads to limited environmental benefits: nitrogen leaching and global warming potential slightly decrease. In the French farm, the German implementation of the Nitrates Directive fosters legume production. Thus, this study shows that allowing manure spreading on legumes can help reaching high legume production in livestock farms. However, this further increase in legume production does not lead to environmental benefits. Thus, allowing manure spreading on legumes to increase their production should be justified by other goals such as improving the protein self-sufficiency of the farm.
Philippe Jeanneaux
added 31 research items
For some Localised Agro-Food Systems (LAFS), for ex. Comté in France, Gruyère in Switzerland, the cheese and milk prices are above average whilst others as for example the Cantal from France are similar or even below average. The objective of this paper is to shed light on levers which the agents activate to assure their uniqueness is irrevocable, and uphold the benefits of their LAFS. Raising Rivals' Costs Theory gives interesting point of view about the behaviour of firms which could make use of the collective rules to raise the costs of their competitors in the particular case of LAFS oriented to the production of traditional cheeses. This will be explored through two cases studies. In the first case (territorial collective governance mode of the local supply chain), the conditions are met to conclude that the raising costs strategy corresponds to requirements which are based to a corresponding quality which meets consumers’ expectations and willingness to pay. In the second case (sectoral governance mode), few firms have taken control on the supply chain and have imposed with the time a model based on costs leadership. As conclusion, a case-by-case in-depth approach is necessary to assess whether strategy to raise costs of the rivals damages consumers welfare in the case of PDO supply chains.
Some Localised Agro-Food Systems (LAFS) are traditionally qualified as success stories (Comté PDO in France, Gruyere PDO in Switzerland, Parmigiano Reggiano PDO in Italy), whilst other PDOs (as for example the Cantal PDO from France) pay the same price for the milk as standard milk. The price difference may reach between 10 and 25% over a long period. To explain this difference, we assume that the agents who make up the LAFS developed a collective action to protect their localized cheese production system against unfair competition and to promote their product outside its region of origin. The aim of this communication is to shed light on levers which the agents activate to assure their uniqueness is irrevocable, and uphold the benefits of their LAFS. We propose to discuss the idea that the search for market power based on the strategy of raising rivals’ costs may be used even outside a situation of vertical integration or a situation in which pressure is applied to suppliers to challenge competitors. We assume that some companies within the LAFS have sufficient control on the rules governing the organization of the traditional system to benefit from it. They also succeed in protecting a kind of relationship between business companies. The Raising Rivals’ Costs theory helps to analyze the economic consequences of the legal set-up implementation and of its control by some companies. Indeed, we show that the collective control of the rules which are set up in the PDO legal framework explain the difficulties met by rivals to stand out through an alternative and independent production system based on the costs leadership strategy. The collective set up of institutions and rules help the agents to achieve a collective competitive advantage in which every agent benefits individually. This is the strategy developed in Europe and particularly for two PDO Localised Agro-cheese Systems: Comté PDO for France and Gruyère PDO for Switzerland.
The lack of monetary compensation and the difficulty for residents to exit close to an incinerator lead them to protest the construction of waste facilities. Opponents try to change undesirable locations to maintain their welfare. With a cost-benefit analysis, our incinerator location model attempts to measure both transportation and externality costs in comparable units. Two extreme behaviours are being tested: the maximisation of the distance from the facility to the residents' homes to avoid externality vs. the minimisation of distance from the households to the incinerator to reduce transportation costs. The aim of this article is to present the effects of opponents on the incinerator location and to propose an idea according to which conflict can change the distribution of resources in society.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
EIP-AGRI Service Point has published a brochure: "Sustainable and resilient farming. Inspiration from agro-ecology".
Apart from other important information you can also read about the LIFT Project (page 7) and Uniseco Project (page 6) and their input towards agro-ecology - https://bit.ly/39qqlPM (file also attached).
#lifth2020 #H2020 #agriculture #farm #ecological #organic #environment #sustainability
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
The content of the newsletter delivers information covering the second year of the project with special emphasis on the achieved deliverables.
LIFT Second Annual Newsletter available at: http://www.lift-h2020.eu/download/1666
 
Irene Tzouramani
added a research item
This questionnaire is for the survey to farmers that is to be carried out in the LIFT project, to at least 1,500 farms across the European Union (EU) in the LIFT case study areas. The LIFT large-scale farmer survey represents a key task that provides value added to the LIFT project and informs EU policy analysis as a whole. The innovation is that it collects primary qualitative and quantitative data at the farm level, but also that data will be comparable across a large geographical area, across different production sectors, as well as across different farming practices/systems. The survey aims at collecting information that is not available in existing data sources, and that will be used in the analyses of the project.
Gaëlle Leduc
added a research item
The deliverable D6.1 of the LIFT project explores what types of discourses are used in six European Union (EU) member states’ Rural Development Programs (RDP) and other agricultural policy docu-ments and how they incorporate ecological approaches across three Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) periods. This multiple case study highlights similarities and differences in the dominant discourses as emerging from national policy documents in the following selected EU member states: France, Ger-many (Bavaria), Hungary, Poland, Romania and Sweden. It also demonstrates how discourse analysis can be used to gain understanding about the dominant discourses expressed in these documents in relation to how ecological approaches are defined, the policy rationale for encouraging ecological ap-proaches and the expected consequences of doing so. Conceptually, we focused on two types of discourses identified from the literature: 1) the three CAP discourses: i) neomercantilism; ii) neoliberalism and iii) multifunctionality, and 2) the five socio-politi-cal discourses of Rural Development (RD): iv) agri-ruralist, v) hedonist, vi) utilitarian, vii) nature con-servation and viii) community sustainability. These types of discourses were together integrated in a model, where each policy discourse depicts agriculture as accomplishing a specific function. The theo-retical framework is grounded within a political economy perspective. This means that policy develops because of confrontation between different concerned agents with different interest, pushing for dif-ferent objectives. The state acts as an intermediary between these agents and aims at ensuring con-sensus and maintenance of agreement. Policy documents are therefore often the result of competing discourses and contradicting policy objectives. Across EU member states, the results show that ecological approaches are mainly depicted with the multifunctionality discourse with two dominating sub-discourses of nature conservation and agri-ru-ralism. Nevertheless, we observe an increase in the use of the neomercantilist discourse in the last CAP period. This parallels what the previous literature finds in Commissioners’ speeches: a reappear-ance of the traditional neomercantilist discourse in the CAP agenda 2014-2020. Farming systems (with farming practices) related to agroecology, biodiversity-based and organic farming are among the most commonly mentioned farming systems.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
UPCOMING EVENT: Organic World Congress will be held on 21-27 September 2019 in Rennes, France - https://owc.ifoam.bio/2020/en.
Among other a LIFT Project output is planned to be presented entitled "Conversion to organic agriculture – a case study in Bavaria".
#lifth2020 #H2020 #agriculture #farm #ecological #organic #environment #sustainability
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
At the end of August 2019, LIFT has achieved 3 deliverables, two of which are public:
- D2.2. LIFT large-scale farmer survey questionnaire (led by DEMETER)
- D6.1. Legislation and political discourse about ecological farming (led by SLU)
In the next few days these will be uploaded to ResearchGate and other official LIFT project social media.
 
Philippe Jeanneaux
added 2 research items
Agricultural cooperatives evolve in a context with complexity and changes of their legal, social and business environment. Strategic management could be a relevant approach to help cooperative members to improve the global performance and the social responsibility of their cooperatives. To formalize and to manage their strategy, we propose as an accompaniment a method entitled PerfCuma. The theoretical framework is based on the concept of systemic approach to change. The method is organized in four steps: i) an in-depth stakeholder's analysis of the cooperative situation (including sustainability) and the cooperative goals; ii) formalizing the strategy by defining strategic lines. We use the cognitive map approach to model the complexity to understand the strong drivers of the strategy; iii) drawing up the balanced scorecard and an action plan to manage the strategy; iv) monitoring the implementation of the strategy. A test of the method on five Cooperatives for the Use of Agricultural Equipment (Cuma) has been successful. The method is now unfolded in France. © 2018 International Farm Management Association and Institute of Agricultural Management.
L’évolution de l’agriculture française entre 1980 et 2016 a été marquée par la poursuite des gains de productivité du travail permis par la forte substitution du capital au travail. Le processus de modernisation inclut de plus en plus les technologies de l'information. Une question se pose : quelles sont les conséquences de la révolution numérique sur les exploitations ? Pour répondre, nous analysons les données tirées de la littérature scientifique et professionnelle et d’enquêtes auprès d’experts. Ces évolutions interrogent le rapport des agriculteurs au travail en termes d’organisation, de conseil et d'autonomie de la décision. Ne serions-nous pas déjà entrés dans le deuxième âge des machines, celui des machines capables de prendre de décisions plus efficaces que les humains ?
Gordana Manevska-Tasevska
added a research item
This deliverable D2.1 of the LIFT project presents the conceptual framework on farmers’ up‐take of ecological approaches across the supply chain. The framework combines behavioural theories on individual decision‐making with drivers and methodological considerations related to economic decision‐making. Furthermore, deliverable D2.1 presents a systematic map of previous literature related to farmers’ up‐take of ecological approaches. The purpose of D2.1 is to guide data Collection through the LIFT survey to farmers and interview studies in WP (workpackage) 2 of LIFT. The theoretical part of the framework departs from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) for understanding individual decision‐making, extended by integrating the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Furthermore, the framework distinguishes between endogenous, as well as exogenous factors such as: (i) motivational factors; (ii) farmers’ self‐identity; (iii) farm characteristics; (iv) supply‐chain characteristics; (v) institutional conditions (including policy framework); and (vi) consumers’ preferences and demands. Factors serve to identify the main drivers of farmers’ up‐take of ecological approaches, and to enable comparison of different dimensions of up‐take across territories. The decision to implement the up‐take of ecological approaches is approached across four different dimensions, according to their: (i) timing; (ii) intensity/extensity; (iii) size of change, and (iv) type of practices adopted. These dimensions are important since the factors that affect the decision to adopt have been found to differ across them. The deliverable continues by presenting a systematic map of previous literature related to farmers’ up‐take of ecological approaches. Two methodological approaches for understanding the drivers of farmers’ up‐take of ecological approaches are suggested: psychometric methodology and qualitative interviews, using the means‐end chain and laddering approach. The deliverable ends by concluding on implications for the LIFT farmers’ survey.
Dan Clavin
added a research item
Administrative datasets are utilised to study farms that have converted to organic beef production in Ireland, to draw lessons for future CAP scheme design. The analysis confirms anecdotal evidence in relation to a leakage of animals from the organic to the non-organic (conventional) beef sector. As a result of this differential response across the value chain, there is sub-optimal production of organic meat relative to the investment in incentives for conversion from non-organic to organic production. This may result in risks to the long term viability of the incentive scheme and more widely, for supports for organic farming.
Carlo Rega
added a research item
The aim of this present Deliverable 1.1 (D1.1) is to lay the foundation for the development of a framework for farm typologies, which takes into account existing typologies and existing nomenclature (e.g. low-input, organic, extensive, high nature value farming, conservation agriculture, agroecological, etc.) when considering in particular the degree to which farms adopt ecological practices. This early phase of the typology work aims at providing a consolidated framework composed of farming systems and farming practices, and a first screening of which practice is associated with which system. This initial stage will be complemented in further deliverables by indicators and thresholds to link concepts to data and models.
Vitaliy Krupin
added an update
LIFT First Annual Newsletter available in 10 European languages: Dutch, English, German, French, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, Romanian and Swedish.
The first newsletter of the LIFT project is aimed to deliver basic information about the project including: its goal and objectives, information about the key workpackages, the aim, means and intensity of interaction with the stakeholders in the project, as well as brief information about the research results achieved so far, past and ongoing events. The newsletter also presents information about the LIFT project research partners, and their official logos, as well as the projects’ social medias.
The LIFT project determines the regular newsletters as one of the tools to reach the public with the information about the project’s progress, having 4 newsletters planned to be delivered throughout the project’s lifetime (first newsletter in January 2019, second newsletter in January 2020, third newsletter in February 2021 and fourth newsletter in April 2022).
Targeted audience for the dissemination of the LIFT newsletter includes, but is not limited to, the stakeholders from the following groups:
– farmers and farmers’ representatives (e.g. unions, farm producer groups),
– up- and downstream companies,
– retailers,
– other economic actors (e.g. banks),
– governments and local administration,
– citizens’ associations (with objectives towards environment, communities, etc.),
– non governmental organizations (NGOs) and consumers,
– European Commission officers,
– researchers.
If you would like to join LIFT mailing list – you can do that by filling out the form on Contacts page of the LIFT website (lift-h2020.eu) and receive LIFT project’s official newsletters and updates.
 
Vitaliy Krupin
added a project goal
LIFT is a research project (2018-2022) aiming to identify and understand how socio-economic and policy drivers impact on the development of ecological approaches to farming and assess the performance and sustainability of such approaches, taking into account different farming systems at farm, farm-group and territorial scales.
Coordinated by INRAE (French National Institute for Research on Agriculture, Food and the Environment, www.inrae.fr) the consortium includes 17 partners from 12 countries. Further information can be found on the project website: www.lift-h2020.eu.
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No 770747.