Project

Knowledge and practice in the fisheries in Norway and Newfoundland

Goal: To study changes in fisheries knowledge and practices in Norway and Newfoundland

Date: 1 January 2002 - 31 December 2004

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Project log

Jahn Petter Johnsen
added a research item
For almost 30 years, the Sami Parliament has worked to gain influence in the Norwegian fisheries governing system in order to secure Sami fisheries as the material basis of Sami culture. Due to developments in international law and their implementation in state law, the Sami Parliament has gained formal access to the country's fisheries governance decision-making process. This paper addresses the challenges for a Sami fisheries approach to gain influence in the national governance system. A major issue relates to differences between the institutional design of the Norwegian system, with ecosystem health, profitability and individual welfare as main concerns, while important pillars formulated by the Sami Parliament are subsidiarity and collective rights. In this article, we discuss what might be the way forward for a Sami fisheries policy to expand within the Norwegian fisheries governance system.
Jahn Petter Johnsen
added a project goal
To study changes in fisheries knowledge and practices in Norway and Newfoundland
 
Jahn Petter Johnsen
added 6 research items
Questions centered on the development of local and traditional ecological knowledge and the relationship of that knowledge to the development of conservation and management practices have recently attracted critical attention. We examine these questions with respect to the dynamic commercial fisheries of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The knowledge of fish harvesters coevolves with fishing practices and is embedded in a dynamic socioecological network that extends into and beyond the fisher, fishery households, and communities to include management, technologies, markets, and marine ecological conditions. Changes in these networks have moved knowledge and practices related to fishing in directions defined by policy, science, economic rationality, and new ecological realities. We characterize this movement as a shift along a continuum from local ecological knowledge (LEK) towards globalized harvesting knowledge (GHK) as harvesters become increasingly disconnected from socioecological relationships associated with traditional species and stocks. We conclude with a discussion of how LEK/GHK have interacted over time and space with other knowledge systems (particularly science) to influence management, and suggest that contingent, empirical evaluations of these interactions will provide a fruitful avenue for future interdisciplinary research.
Bruno Latour er blant dem som meiner at naturen ikke er noe gitt, men noe som produseres, samtidig forsvarer han realismen i vitenskapen. Det er sjølve arbeidet med å produsere natur som opptar Latour, mer enn sluttproduktet. Latours kritikere oppfatter denne posisjonen som konstruktivisme, relativisme og antirealisme, men sjøl argumenterer han for at han og hans kolleger er opptatt av hvordan realisme gjennom praksiser, allianser og aktører tilføyes, slik at natur og samfunn får form og innhold. De framstår dermed både som radikale konstruktivisterog realister, men med en annen innfallsvinkel til forholdet mellom kunnskap og virkelighet enn hva sosialkonstruktivister og realister har forutsatt. Gjennom en analyse av sider ved norsk fiskeribiologisk forsking beskriver denne artikkelen hvordan en slik konstruktivistisk realisme er mulig og hvordan naturvitenskapen produserer natur.