Project

KNOW - Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality

Goal: ‘Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality' (KNOW) seeks to deliver transformative research and capacity-building for innovation in policy and planning to promote urban equality.

KNOW is guided by the aspiration to produce more equal cities. It focuses on three development challenges: delivering prosperity, tackling extreme poverty and building resilient cities.

KNOW is a four-year programme funded by ESRC under the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). Led by Professor Caren Levy, Bartlett Development Planning Unit (DPU) UCL, KNOW is made up of a global consortium of researchers and partners across 13 institutions, focusing on nine countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

The project comprises six interrelated Work Packages:
1. City knowledge co-production
2. Comparative inquiry for urban equality
3. The ethics of research practice
4. Translating research into practice
5. Multiplying trans-local learning in higher education
6. Expanding UK ODA research capacity for urban equality

For more information see: https://www.urban-know.com/.

Date: 1 January 2018

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Project log

Camila Cocina
added a research item
Feminist, Southern, and decolonial thinkers have long argued that epistemological questions about how knowledge is produced and whose knowledge is valued and actioned are crucial in addressing inequalities, and a key challenge for planning. This collaborative article interrogates how knowledge is mobilised in urban planning and practice, discussing three experiences which have actively centred often-excluded voices, as a way of disrupting knowledge hierarchies in planning. We term these “emancipatory circuits of knowledge”—processes whereby diverse, situated, and marginalised forms of knowledge are co-produced and mobilised across urban research and planning, to address inequalities. We discuss experiences from the Technological University José Antonio Echeverría (CUJAE), a university in Havana, Cuba, that privileges a fluid and collaborative understanding of universities as social actors; the Sierra Leone Urban Research Centre, a research institute in the city of Freetown, which curates collective and inclusive spaces for community action planning, to challenge the legacies of colonial-era planning; and the Asian Coalition for Housing Rights, a regional network across Asia, which facilitates processes of exchange and co-learning which are highly strategic and situated in context, to advance community-led development. Shared across these “emancipatory circuits” are three “sites of impact” through which these partners have generated changes: encouraging inclusive policy and planning outcomes; shifting the planning praxis of authorities, bureaucrats, and researchers; and nurturing collective trajectories through building solidarities. Examining these three sites and their challenges, we query how urban knowledge is produced and translated towards epistemic justice, examining the tensions and the possibilities for building pathways to urban equality. Shared across these ‘emancipatory circuits’ are three layered ‘sites of impact’ through which these partners have generated changes: encouraging inclusive policy and planning outcomes; shifting the planning praxis of authorities, bureaucrats and researchers; and nurturing collective trajectories through processes of building solidarities. Examining these three sites and their challenges, we query the ways in which urban knowledge is produced and translated towards epistemic justice –examining the tensions and the possibilities for building pathways to urban equality.</p
Saffron Woodcraft
added a research item
Swahili translation of article first published in Urban Planning: https://www.cogitatiopress.com/urbanplanning/ article/view/3177 Residents of informal settlements in urban centres in Africa are known to suffer disproportionate burdens of environmental and socio-economic inequalities and are often excluded from macro-level visions and policies that seek to make cities safer and prosperous (Birkmann, 2007; da Silva & Braulio, 2014; Dodman et al., 2013). This tension undermines the validity of orthodox, ‘expert-led’ visions, policies and measures of prosperity that are distant from the lived-experience of marginalised urban residents. Based on new empirical work with communities in three informal settlements in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, this article argues that novel methodological and theoretical approaches to co-producing context-specific policy-relevant knowledge about pathways to prosperity (translated by the communities as maisha bora, ‘the good life’) creates inclusive spaces for both community participation in processes of urban knowledge production and critical social enquiry that can lead to grounded theory building. By co-producing both an agreed and relevant methodological approach for the study, and its subsequent documentation and analysis, this work contributes valuable empirical insights about the capacities and capabilities of local communities to shape and influence urban policy-making and in this way speaks to calls for a global urbanism (Ong, 2011; Robinson, 2016) that brings diverse voices and geographies to urban theory to better account for the diversity of urban experiences and processes found in twenty-first century cities.
Christopher Yap
added a research item
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent a call for a transformative global agenda, outlining a clear commitment to inclusive, sustainable, and just global processes. In particular, the SDGs emphasis on ‘leaving no one behind’ demands a deep engagement with the urbanisation of inequalities, one of the most pressing challenges we face today. As such, the SDGs are a crucial tool in achieving more just urban futures. However, the SDG framework also contains a diversity of positions and assumptions across its 17 Goals, 169 targets, and 231 unique indicators—reflecting different understandings of contested concepts such as sustainability, resilience, and equality. As such, the extent to which localisation processes are able to guide outcomes towards greater urban equality will depend upon how these goals and targets are interpreted and actioned within distinct national and local contexts and narratives. This brief outlines the case for the adoption of an urban equality lens to orient decision-making through localisation processes. We ground our understanding in a multi- dimensional and relational concept of ‘urban equality’, reflecting interrelated dimensions of: distribution, recognition, parity of participation, and solidarity and mutual care. Drawing on grounded examples of research and practice across a range of cities, this brief outlines three opportunities in the adoption of an urban equality lens: as a way to maximise positive synergies across the goals and targets; to deepen engagement with local specificity and aspirations; and to re-orient local and global processes towards truly inclusive outcomes. This brief concludes by setting out four principles to support the operationalisation of an urban equality lens through the SDGs.
Emmanuel Osuteye
added a research item
As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads in Africa, attention is increasingly shifting to the potential and ongoing impact on informal settlements, which face considerable challenges around the implementation of conventional control measures of social distancing, hand washing and self-isolation. In Freetown, Sierra Leone, residents of informal settlements have relied on local community organisations and groups, and their resourcefulness to provide essential preparedness, response and on-going support to alleviate the public health and economic risks associated with the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. This is also premised on lessons drawn from dealing with previous epidemics, notably the Ebola virus disease in 2014–2015. This paper will explain the nature and form of community organisation that can be galvanised and leveraged for COVID-19 preparedness and responses that are suited for informal settlements. Secondly, it highlights the critical contribution of community organisations in social protection measures that tackle deeply entrenched inequalities in rapidly urbanising contexts. Finally, the cases examined seek to provide evidence of the value of processes of continuous learning within community organisation that are essential for both humanitarian assistance and emergency management. Although situated in Freetown, the broad lessons drawn are relevant for urban-poor communities and informal settlements in many urban African centres.
Christopher Yap
added an update
The fourth KNOW working paper, "Institutional Capabilities towards urban equality: Reflections from the KNOW Programme in Bangalore, Kampala and Havana" by Alexandre Apsan Frediani, Camila Cociña, Gautam Bhan, Shuaib Lwasa, Jorge Peña Díaz and Caren Levy is now available to download from the KNOW website: https://www.urban-know.com/no-4-know-working-paper
The document starts with an introduction by Alexandre Apsan Frediani and Camila Cociña, which frames the notion of institutional capabilities. Then, reflections from three KNOW Investigators are presented: Gautam Bhan from the Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS) in Bangalore, India, reflects on institutional capabilities within education institutions in the piece “Notes from Bangalore: Reflections on teaching urban practices”. Shuaib Lwasa from Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, discusses “Scalable solutions for social inclusiveness and embracing of informality: Waste economies to enhance urban livelihoods in informal settlements in Kampala”; and Jorge Peña Díaz from the Technological University of Havana (CUJAE), Cuba, discusses “Urban equality in Havana: The role of research networks in increasing state capabilities”. The Working Paper concludes with reflections by Caren Levy on how these cases talk to questions of urban equality. Apart from enabling comparative thinking and reflections across these three contexts, the different sections of this Working Paper aim to explore the usefulness of the concept ‘institutional capabilities’ as a framework for the implementation of global urban agendas.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
The article, Yap, C., & McFarlane, C. (2020). Understanding and researching urban extreme poverty: a conceptual–methodological approach. Environment and Urbanization, 32(1), 254–274., is now available Open Access here: [https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0956247819890829]
 
Christopher Yap
added a research item
Urban planning as a networked field of governance can be an essential contributor for de-colonising planning education and shaping pathways to urban equality. Educating planners with the capabilities to address complex socio-economic, environmental and political processes that drive inequality requires critical engagement with multiple knowledges and urban praxes in their learning processes. However, previous research on cities of the global South has identified severe quantitative deficits, outdated pedagogies, and qualitative shortfalls in current planning education. Moreover, the political economy and pedagogic practices adopted in higher education programmes often reproduce Western-centric political imaginations of planning, which in turn reproduce urban inequality. Many educational institutions across the global South, for example, continue teaching colonial agendas and fail to recognise everyday planning practices in the way cities are built and managed. This article contributes to a better understanding of the relation between planning education and urban inequalities by critically exploring the distribution of regional and global higher education networks and their role in de-colonising planning. The analysis is based on a literature review, quantitative and qualitative data from planning and planning education networks, as well as interviews with key players within them. The article scrutinises the geography of these networks to bring to the fore issues of language, colonial legacies and the dominance of capital cities, which, among others, currently work against more plural epistemologies and praxes. Based on a better understanding of the networked field of urban planning in higher education and ongoing efforts to open up new political imaginations and methodologies, the article suggests emerging room for manoeuvre to foster planner’s capabilities to shape urban equality at scale.
Yael Padan
added a research item
This paper reflects on approaches to conducting “ethical research” on architecture and urban (in)equality in cities in the global south. It focuses on two themes: the formalization of institutional ethics procedures and protocols for conducting such research, and the need to move away from ethical frameworks that emerge from western structures for knowledge production. The paper will question whether ethical principles are universal or specific, and how they affect the possibility of knowledge co-production and its potential to generate pathways to urban equality. These questions arise from the history of contemporary research ethics procedures, which are rooted in the social norms of western modernity that views researchers and research participants as “autonomous individuals.” The paper will suggest that exploring the relation of the individual to the collective and understanding social existence as relationality, is fundamental in formulating an alternative type of ethics methodology.
Emmanuel Osuteye
added a research item
Residents of informal settlements in urban centres in Africa are known to suffer disproportionate burdens of environmental and socio-economic inequalities and are often excluded from macro-level visions and policies that seek to make cities safer and prosperous (Birkmann, 2007; da Silva & Braulio, 2014; Dodman et al., 2013). This tension undermines the validity of orthodox, ‘expert-led’ visions, policies and measures of prosperity that are distant from the lived-experience of marginalised urban residents. Based on new empirical work with communities in three informal settlements in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, this article argues that novel methodological and theoretical approaches to co-producing context-specific policy-relevant knowledge about pathways to prosperity (translated by the communities as maisha bora, ‘the good life’) creates inclusive spaces for both community participation in processes of urban knowledge production and critical social enquiry that can lead to grounded theory building. By co-producing both an agreed and relevant methodological approach for the study, and its subsequent documentation and analysis, this work contributes valuable empirical insights about the capacities and capabilities of local communities to shape and influence urban policy-making and in this way speaks to calls for a global urbanism (Ong, 2011; Robinson, 2016) that brings diverse voices and geographies to urban theory to better account for the diversity of urban experiences and processes found in twenty-first century cities.
Christopher Yap
added a research item
Social movement organizations are increasingly developing human rights strategies at the municipal level, particularly in European urban contexts. Yet critical scholarly work on human rights has overlooked two related realities: non-state-centric, social movement use of the tools and discourses of rights, and the strategic participation of citizen groups in municipal urban policy spaces. This article builds on critical human rights theory through the experiences of three grassroots organizations claiming and exercising social rights in urban policy spaces of Barcelona, Valladolid, and London. It engages with a number of scholarly critiques of the state and human rights, particularly focusing on those critiques that question their compatibility with autonomy, democracy, and self-government at the local level. While the value of such critical literature is undeniable, we show how urban grassroots practices and experiences with social rights-based strategies in the context of housing, water, and participation can circumvent some of these critiques on the ground, pointing at new avenues for critical legal research when infused with other critical discourses, including urban politics.
Christopher Yap
added an update
‘Exploring Urban Equality and Heritage Livelihoods in the Museum of Da Nang’ by Prof Graeme Were (University of Bristol) examines how co-production methodologies might be used to better equip museums to promote more equal cities.
The paper is available to download here: https://www.urban-know.com/know-working-paper-03
Graeme collaborated with museum staff and KNOW City Partners, The Community Engaged Learning Centre, Da Nang Architecture University (CELC- DAU) (a member of the Asian Coalition for Housing Rights in the KNOW programme), to examine issues of inclusion, livelihoods, and heritage in a rapidly changing urban context.
This research was funded by the KNOW Small Grants Fund. For more information on the Fund visit: https://www.urban-know.com/smallgrantsfund.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality (KNOW) is delighted to share our latest Newsletter 'In the KNOW' #3. 
In this issue, we take an in-depth look at the last six months of the programme, showcasing key strategic moments such as the third KNOW Annual Workshop. This workshop brought together 45 team members in Bengaluru, India, providing a unique opportunity to work together prior to the rapid changes in the world which we are currently facing. For the time being, the newsletter is only available online via the links below:  Download a free PDF copy here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/16KBWWuT9oxWCr1Sy6TTZQLCARb8bgLfx/view
Or, read it via the online Adobe viewer here: https://indd.adobe.com/view/f98557e6-c9df-47ec-8a8d-6100127293cd
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality (KNOW) has launched a dedicated online space to share and collect stories related to the current COVID-19 crisis from KNOW City Partners, who are faced with the challenging task of tackling the global pandemic and its effects on the urban poor. 
Over time, this dynamic space will be populated with stories, policy briefs, updates, responses, and other relevant materials. You can also find information regarding upcoming and recorded COVID-19 related webinars from KNOW partners.
To stay in the KNOW, please subscribe to our mailing list to receive updates from our COVID-19 page and other KNOW outputs, events, and news: https://www.urban-know.com/subscribe
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
KNOW is pleased to announce the second set of awards made by the KNOW Small Grants Fund. The Fund was set up to support scholars at UK universities, policy research institutions, and NGOs with a research portfolio to travel to KNOW partner cities to conduct primary research that relates to the theme of urban equality.
The second call for applications went live in October 2019. From a competitive field of applicants, the Selection Committee selected four projects that resonate closely with the work of our local partners and contribute new perspectives to our understandings of urban equality.
Congratulations to Andrea Jimenez Cisneros from the University of Sheffield, Cristian Fernando Olmos Herrera from the University of Brighton, Nikhilesh Sinha from Hult International Business School, and Isabel Young from the Young Foundation; the second cohort of KNOW Small Grants awardees.
The third call for applications for the KNOW Small Grants Fund will be released in autumn 2020.
 
Emmanuel Osuteye
added a research item
This working paper serves as the basis for a critical examination of the notion of knowledge co-production. First, the paper examines how the idea of knowledge co-production has emerged in relation to the parallel but distinct concept of service co-production and the participatory development planning tradition. Second, the paper examines the variety of processes of knowledge co-production that may take place in the context of academic research. In doing so, the working paper highlights the centrality of knowledge co-production in the KNOW project’s research strategy, with a focus on actionable knowledge that may support transformative trajectories towards urban equality. Such an approach is based on the view that knowledge production underpins the process, ethics, and outcomes of any urban development intervention. Looking at well-documented examples of knowledge co-production in research for urban equality, the review examines how knowledge co-production is delivered in practice. The focus on how knowledge co-production is used in action research also helps to identify some limitations and key challenges, and existing mechanisms to overcome them. The working paper ends with a proposal for a research agenda on knowledge co-production in the context of the KNOW project.
Christopher Yap
added an update
KNOW Research Fellow Stephanie Butcher reflects on the Third KNOW Annual Meeting, hosted by the Indian Institute for Human Settlements, asking: what are we learning about urban equality?
 
Christopher Yap
added a research item
Urban extreme poverty has long been regarded as a vital challenge for policy and practice, but how might we research it? In this article, we set out a two-step approach to identifying and understanding the nature of urban extreme poverty (UEP). We experiment with an approach that does not define UEP in advance but seeks to examine it through a series of dimensions and approaches. Drawing on the long history of research on UEP, we argue that research would benefit from early scoping in context. This scoping begins by examining how UEP surfaces in relation to five dimensions: material, economic, political, spatial and emotional-subjective. From that base, we argue for a focus on the causes and form of UEP through dialogue among four epistemic approaches: political economy, political ecology, feminist urbanism and postcolonial urbanism. We illustrate this approach in relation to two quite distinct cities: Mumbai and Lima.
Christopher Yap
added an update
Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality (KNOW), is pleased to announce the opening of the second round of the KNOW Small Grants Fund
The Fund will award grants that enable UK-based scholars at UK universities, policy research institutions, and NGOs with a research portfolio to conduct research relating to the theme of urban equality in one of our KNOW partner cities:
  • Lima (Peru)
  • Havana (Cuba)
  • San José (Costa Rica)
  • Freetown (Sierra Leone)
  • Kampala (Uganda)
  • Dar es Salaam (Tanzania)
  • Da Nang (Vietnam)
  • Nakhon Sawan (Thailand)
  • Yogyakarta (Indonesia)
  • Yangon (Myanmar)
The Fund will award a stipend of up to £1500 per calendar month for up to two months, as well as the cost of return flights to one of the KNOW partner cities.
Eligibility 
  • Applicants must be UK-based.
  • Applicants must be currently employed at a UK Higher Education Institution, UK-based policy-research institute, or UK-based Non-Governmental Organisation with a research portfolio. In each case, contract of employment should exceed the proposed duration of the research visit.
  • The proposed research should engage with the theme of urban equality, although the applicant has the freedom to shape, and make explicit, how their proposed focus makes this link.
  • Knowledge of the local language is desirable but is not essential.
  • Experience of working in the proposed city is desirable but is not essential.
  • Please note that current doctoral students are not eligible to apply.
Timing
The deadline for applications is 12.00 pm, Monday 18th November 2019. Interviews will be held the week commencing 2nd December 2019. The grants will be awarded on 12th December 2019 for research to commence between January-August 2020.
For more information and to apply, visit: https://www.urban-know.com/smallgrantsfund.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
The latest The second of KNOW's bi-annual newsletter takes an in-depth look at the last six months, which has seen the acceleration of research and capacity-building across the KNOW programme. 
Some highlights from the issue include:
  • A feature piece from our Work Package 3 team with a focus on the Ethics of Research Practice
  • Reflections from the second KNOW Annual Workshop, which took place in Havana, Cuba, January 2019 
  • Maisha bora - living a good life” and how we can co-produce pathways to prosperity in Dar es Salaam, in a piece from our Work Package 2 and CCI team
 
Camila Cocina
added a research item
Participation and collaborative approaches to planning have become central in urban debates and practices. Critiques about the limitations of 'participation in planning', however, have led to the development of a series of approaches that build beyond 'collaborative' understandings of planning. Approaches such as insurgent or postcollaborative planning, movement-initiated co-production, socio-spatial learning, agonistic practices or participation as political have moved the understanding of planning towards a wider spectrum of city-making practices, beyond disciplinary and professional boundaries, and in which some forms of participation become the very practice of planning. This article builds on those debates, proposing an understanding of 'participation as planning'. Building on Southern urban theory and recognizing the difference between a discussion about participation and one that looks at planning through participation, the article proposes to recognize that there is a range of experiences of participatory city-making taking place in urban contexts, some of which fall into one of the referred categories, while others have remained as a 'blind-spot' in planning debates. The article identifies and discusses a series of strategies that have emerged from Southern contexts, and that represent ways of dealing with planning limits: collective forms of spatial production that respond to the inadequacy of planning instruments to engage with diverse processes of city-making situated beyond dominant practices; partnership-oriented practices that react to the neoliberalization and financialization of planning; and advocacyoriented practices to contest abusive planning practices which violate human rights.
Christopher Yap
added an update
UCL Leverhulme Visiting Professor Oren Yiftachel, explores recent attempts to translate in 'real time' theories of justice to urban planning.
This thought provoking discussion addresses the redistribution of resources, the establishment of democratic practices, as well as the politics of recognition, ranging from positive affirmation to outright hostility. Prof Yiftachel reports and analyses recent attempts to promote the practice of 'doing the just city' through targeted projects involving students and practitioners in several cities in Israel/Palestine.
For more information visit: urban-know.com/dialogues
 
Camila Cocina
added a research item
This working paper presents a conceptual inquiry into the relationship between planning research and practice. It proposes to look at the geographies of knowledge production and their influence in policies and planning that advance urban equality. The paper develops a theoretical approach to ‘knowledge translation’ – understood as the encounters between research and practice – to account for the logics that govern the production of knowledge at different scales, and their implications for planning practice. It proposes that in order to deal with the complexity of current urban challenges there are two aspects of the existing paradigms of knowledge translation that need to be revisited: the supposedly linear and unidirectional relationship between research and practice; and the limited understanding of the politics of translocal geographies of knowledge production and circulation. The paper presents a review of current debates on planning research and practice, and discusses how a Southern perspective can challenge current assumptions about geographies of knowledge. It then proposes a framework to study knowledge translation processes, drawing on the sociology of knowledge, development studies, and feminist theory. From this viewpoint, it discusses the potentials of an operative notion of ‘interfaces of knowledge translation’ that brings to light power dynamics behind interfaces and enhances the potentials of knowledge co-production.
Christopher Yap
added an update
"Knowledge translation in global urban agendas: A history of research-practice encounters in the Habitat conferences" by Camila Cocina, Michele Acuto, Alex Frediani, & Caren Levy just published in World Development.
OPEN ACCESS UNTIL 20 JULY 2019. Download for free here:
 
Camila Cocina
added a research item
The relationship between planning research and practice plays a key role in shaping global commitments related to urban development. Arguably, this is the case for a ‘global urban agenda’ being articulated at an international scale via frameworks like the Sustainable Development Goals and the New Urban Agenda. These multilateral commitments have been shaped by power relationships and assumptions about what kind of knowledge is valuable at different historical moments, a recognition of the local and global impacts of urban development and what sort of urban development is desirable at specific historical junctures. The pathways that have led to the present global attention to cities are as telling as the frameworks themselves. In this paper, we explore the history of multilateral and international networks that have shaped today’s global urban agenda. We focus on the three United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat I, II and III) as milestones in the evolution of this agenda. Drawing on Southern urban theory and current debates on the interaction of practitioners and academics, we discuss the paradigms that have shaped the ways in which knowledge has been articulated, circulated and valued in those historical moments via the concept of ‘knowledge translation’. We discuss the way in which ‘urban equality’ has been approached and explored in the praxis of these agendas. To do so, the paper discusses community-based cases that can highlight the different knowledge paradigms, and the power dynamics behind them, opening up questions about the challenges of including diverse voices and knowledges in the ‘global’ conversation on urban agendas.
Christopher Yap
added an update
*****Please note there has been a change of venue. See new venue below*******
Join us for the 8th event in the KNOW Dialogues in Urban Equality series.,
'Rethinking Prosperity'
This event will focus on metrics as powerful forms of urban knowledge and the role they play in shaping how prosperity and inequality are conceptualised, measured, and acted on in cities.
Speakers include Prof Henrietta Moore (UCL) and Dr Jose Gabriel Palma (University of Cambridge).
When: Tuesday March 19th at 17:30GMT
Where: 26 Bedford Way Room LG04 , UCL, London
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
We are pleased to announce the opening of the KNOW Small Grants Fund. The Fund will award grants that enable UK-based scholars at UK universities, policy research institutions, and NGOs with a research portfolio to conduct research relating to the theme of urban equality in one of the KNOW partner cities.
Applications are welcome from early-career, mid-career, and senior researchers. Applicants will be required to prepare a research proposal that relates to the theme of urban equality and to the priorities of a local partner.
The Fund will award a stipend of up to £1500 per calendar month for up to two months, as well as the cost of return flights to one of the KNOW partner cities. The Fund supports interdisciplinary inquiry and we welcome applicants from a range of academic disciplines.
The deadline for the KNOW Small Grants Fund applications is 12:00 pm (GMT) Monday 11th March 2019.
For more information about the Fund, or to apply, please visit https://www.urban-know.com/smallgrantsfund.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
Join us for the first in our 2019 continued series of Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality (KNOW)'s Dialogues in Urban Equality. This month Colin Marx discusses the role of urban land markets.
Tuesday 15th January 2018 17:00PM DPU@Senate House, 403 Senate House London WC1E 7HU
Dialogues in Urban Equality: The Role of Urban Land Markets
Land markets are key drivers of urban inequality. In cities across the global South, the urban poor are forced to live on risky land, excluded from formal land markets, and displaced by market forces. Through urban land markets and unjust land use planning, social and economic inequalities become spatialised within the city. And yet, land markets also represent an important opportunity to leverage fairer and more equal cities. Thinking beyond binaries of formal-informal, planned-unplanned, we invite you to join us to discuss the significance of urban land for building pathways to urban equality.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
The video of the latest Dialogues in Urban Equality event on the theme of urban extreme poverty is now live. Watch Prof David Satterthwaite, Prof Caroline Moser, and Prof Colin Mcfarlane reflect on the challenge of researching, understanding, and eradicating poverty in cities.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
Join us for our fifth in the series of KNOW Dialogues in Urban Equality, this month focusing on Extreme Poverty:
When: Wednesday 07 November 2018, 5:30PM-7:00PM
Where: Wilkins Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower St. London WC1E 6BT In the struggle for fairer and more equal cities, urban extreme poverty remains a fundamental and intractable challenge. In the past thirty years, global poverty has decreased significantly. But global trends hide important variations within and between countries and regions; within and between urban and rural contexts.
We ask three renowned scholars on the subject of urban poverty to reflect on the changeable and changing nature of urban extreme poverty: how does urban extreme poverty manifest for different groups in different cities across the global South; how does the nature of urban poverty shift with time, place, and context; and what do these changes mean for efforts to increase urban equality?
Discussants:
Prof David Satterthwaite (International Institute for Environment and Development)
Emeritus Prof Caroline Moser (University of Manchester)
Prof Colin McFarlane (University of Durham)
Chaired by Prof Caren Levy (UCL)
**Please note we will recording this event and streaming live at https://www.facebook.com/UrbanKnow/.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
We welcome you to join us for our next Dialogues in Urban Equality event: The Ethics of Urban Research Practice.  
When: Wednesday 17 October 5:00-6:30PM
Where:  DPU@SenateHouse, 403 Senate House, Malet Street London, WC1E 7HU 
Research involving the co-production of knowledge for urban equality raises ethical issues. This dialogue explores how the practice of research operates between institutionalised ethical codes and procedures, and the situated conditions on the ground. We will discuss the relevance of medical ethics for humanities research; the institutionalisation of ethics into systems and professional bodies; and the conflict between western notions of ethics based on individuality, compared to more collaborative practices of care for the other.
Our discussants will include:
  • Prof Jane Rendell & Dr Yael Padan (The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL)
  • Dr Ella Parry-Davies (The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama
  • Jennifer Roest (The Oxford University Ethox Centre)
  • Dr David Roberts (The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL)
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
We welcome you to join us for our next Dialogues in Urban Equality event: The Ethics of Urban Research Practice.  
When: Wednesday 17 October 5:00-6:30PM
Where:  DPU@SenateHouse, 403 Senate House, Malet Street London, WC1E 7HU 
Research involving the co-production of knowledge for urban equality raises ethical issues. This dialogue explores how the practice of research operates between institutionalised ethical codes and procedures, and the situated conditions on the ground. We will discuss the relevance of medical ethics for humanities research; the institutionalisation of ethics into systems and professional bodies; and the conflict between western notions of ethics based on individuality, compared to more collaborative practices of care for the other.
Our discussants will include:
  • Prof Jane Rendell & Dr Yael Padan (The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL)
  • Dr Ella Parry-Davies (The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama
  • Jennifer Roest (The Oxford University Ethox Centre)
  • Dr David Roberts (The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL)
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
At the second event in our Dialogues in Urban Equality series Vanesa Castan Broto, Barbara Lipietz, and Catalina discuss the role of coproduction in making cities more equal. See the video here: https://www.urban-know.com/resources-media
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
We welcome you to join us for the next Dialogues in Urban Equality event: Planning Education: Re-framing urban planning pedagogies 
When: Monday 01 October 5:00-6:30PM
Where:  DPU@SenateHouse, 403 Senate House, Malet Street London, WC1E 7HU 
Our discussants will interrogate pedagogies that facilitate co-learning and the co-production of knowledge at different scales, with multiple actors from the government, the private sector, academia, and civil society. 
Our discussants will include:
  • Prof Adriana Allen (The Bartlett Development Planning Unit, UCL)
  • Prof Elaine Unterhalter (UCL Institute for Education
  • Lorena Zárate (President of Habitat International Coalition (HIC))
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
At the first event in our Dialogues in Urban Equality series, Cassidy Johnson explored the relationships between climate change resilience, everyday disaster risk reduction, and urban equality in cities in the global South.
 
Christopher Yap
added an update
KNOW website now live: https://www.urban-know.com/
How to co-produce knowledge and build capacity to make cities more equal in the global South.
 
Christopher Yap
added a project goal
‘Knowledge in Action for Urban Equality' (KNOW) seeks to deliver transformative research and capacity-building for innovation in policy and planning to promote urban equality.
KNOW is guided by the aspiration to produce more equal cities. It focuses on three development challenges: delivering prosperity, tackling extreme poverty and building resilient cities.
KNOW is a four-year programme funded by ESRC under the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). Led by Professor Caren Levy, Bartlett Development Planning Unit (DPU) UCL, KNOW is made up of a global consortium of researchers and partners across 13 institutions, focusing on nine countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
The project comprises six interrelated Work Packages:
1. City knowledge co-production
2. Comparative inquiry for urban equality
3. The ethics of research practice
4. Translating research into practice
5. Multiplying trans-local learning in higher education
6. Expanding UK ODA research capacity for urban equality
For more information see: https://www.urban-know.com/.