Project

K-12 level physics

Goal: When writing his famous Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman’s ambition was “to maintain the interest of the very enthusiastic and rather smart students coming out of the high schools and into Caltech. They have heard a lot about how interesting and exciting physics is—the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, and other modern ideas. By the end of two years of our previous course, many would be very discouraged because there were really very few grand, new, modern ideas presented to them. They were made to study inclined planes, electrostatics, and so forth, and after two years it was quite stultifying. The problem was whether or not we could make a course which would save the more advanced and excited student by maintaining his enthusiasm.”

We welcome contributions that help to do a better job at this by reducing, rather than increasing, the so-called mysteries of quantum physics. The approach has to be practical. We start from a firm theoretical basis, to then delve into practical data gathering and analysis techniques used in real-life applications (e.g. optical mineralogy).

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Project log

Jean Louis Van Belle
added a research item
I looked at my 29 papers on my ResearchGate page, and I think some of them should be re-written or re-packaged so as to ensure a good flow of the arguments in them. I also note now that some of the approaches were more productive than others (some did not lead anywhere at all, actually), and so I felt like I should point those out. There are some errors in logic here and there too (small ones, I think, but errors nevertheless), and then quite some typos. Hence, I thought I should, perhaps, produce an annotated version of these papers, with comments and corrections as mark-ups. However, re-writing or re-structuring all of them would require too much work, so I do not want to go there. I, therefore, just add this paper with comments and annotations to the series.
Jean Louis Van Belle
added a research item
The special problem we try to get at with these lectures is to maintain the interest of the very enthusiastic and rather smart people trying to understand physics. They have heard a lot about how interesting and exciting physics is—the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, and other modern ideas—and spend many years studying textbooks or following online courses. Many are discouraged because there are really very few grand, new, modern ideas presented to them. Also, when they ask too many questions, they are usually told no one really understands or, worse, to just shut up and calculate. Hence, we were wondering whether or not we can make a course which would save them by maintaining their enthusiasm. This paper is the sixth chapter of such (draft) course.
Jean Louis Van Belle
added a research item
Short presentation (7 pages only) of ring current model of elementary particles, the nuclear force model, and the usefulness of quaternion algebra.
Jean Louis Van Belle
added 12 research items
Very basic re-explanation of basic geometry and mathematical concepts (K-12 level). This is the introduction which, we hope, will entice you get through the grind: In the epilogue to his Lectures, Feynman writes the following: “The main purpose of my teaching has not been to prepare you for some examination—it was not even to prepare you to serve industry or the military. I wanted most to give you some appreciation of the wonderful world and the physicist’s way of looking at it, which, I believe, is a major part of the true culture of modern times. (There are probably professors of other subjects who would object, but I believe that they are completely wrong.) Perhaps you will not only have some appreciation of this culture; it is even possible that you may want to join in the greatest adventure that the human mind has ever begun.” This paper – which aims to offer a very basic introduction to the mathematical concepts that you will need, and how they relate to (quantum) physics – may or may not encourage you to effectively start exploring things yourself, so it can become part of your culture too! :-)
This paper explores the common concept of a field and the quantization of fields. We do so by discussing the quantization of traveling fields using our photon model, and we also look at the quantization of fields in the context of a perpetual ring current in a superconductor. We then relate the discussion to the use of the (scalar and vector) potential in quantum physics and, finally, a brief discussion of Schrödinger's wave equation which, we argue, just models the equations of motion of charged particles in static and/or dynamic electromagnetic fields-just what Dirac was looking for. We argue that the idea that Schrödinger's equation may not be relativistically correct is based on an erroneous interpretation of the concept of the effective mass of an electron.
Jean Louis Van Belle
added a project goal
When writing his famous Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman’s ambition was “to maintain the interest of the very enthusiastic and rather smart students coming out of the high schools and into Caltech. They have heard a lot about how interesting and exciting physics is—the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, and other modern ideas. By the end of two years of our previous course, many would be very discouraged because there were really very few grand, new, modern ideas presented to them. They were made to study inclined planes, electrostatics, and so forth, and after two years it was quite stultifying. The problem was whether or not we could make a course which would save the more advanced and excited student by maintaining his enthusiasm.”
We welcome contributions that help to do a better job at this by reducing, rather than increasing, the so-called mysteries of quantum physics. The approach has to be practical. We start from a firm theoretical basis, to then delve into practical data gathering and analysis techniques used in real-life applications (e.g. optical mineralogy).