Project

IoCT-CARE: Internet of Cognitive Things for Personalized Healthcare

Goal: Quality of Experience (QoE) is a key metric for successful delivery of end-user services for IoT-enabled applications. Achieving consistent end-user QoE poses tremendous challenges in the face of resource constraints and dynamic variations at multiple scales of the IoT system stack: at the application, network, resource, and device levels. This proposal outlines a self-aware cognitive architecture – the Internet of Cognitive Things (IoCT) – that delivers acceptable QoE by adapting to dynamic variations in infrastructural compute, communication and resource needs, while also synergistically learning and adapting to end user behavior. The approach leverages edge (i.e., Fog) computing architectures to introduce intelligence and adaptability in integrated multi-scale IoT systems. The objective is to efficiently manage information acquisition, communication and processing across different scales of the IoT systems, while synergistically coupling learning of end-user behaviors to deliver efficient and customized services. The proposed IoCT system is the first example of architecture where a network of algorithms communicates and collaborates synergistically to achieve a system-wide objective. Cognition and edge computing architectures are leveraged to introduce intelligence and adaptability in integrated multi-scale IoT systems, through a Personal Holistic Cognitive Optimization (PHCO) framework. To this aim, the IoCT will adopt recently proposed learning and control techniques (i.e. Deep Q-Networks), and exploit self-awareness principles to achieve effective system optimization. The project leverages on-going collaboration with the Turku University Hospital to demonstrate a personalized ubiquitous healthcare framework using the Early Warning Score (EWS) system for human health monitoring. Healthcare spending accounts for almost 17% of the GDP in the US. In healthcare, effective monitoring and observation of patients plays a key role in detecting a deteriorating patient. This project’s exemplar application on efficient early detection of these life-threatening signs can potentially save lives through better quality of care, and timely delivery of critical/urgent health indicators. The framework and services are also applicable to a broad range of other IoT application domains.

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Project log

Amir M. Rahmani
added a research item
Cardiovascular diseases are one of the world's major causes of loss of life. The vital signs of a patient can indicate this up to 24 hours before such an incident happens. Healthcare professionals use Early Warning Score (EWS) as a common tool in healthcare facilities to indicate the health status of a patient. However , the chance of survival of an outpatient could be increased if a mobile EWS system would monitor them during their daily activities to be able to alert in case of danger. Because of limited healthcare professional supervision of this health condition assessment, a mobile EWS system needs to have an acceptable level of reliability even if errors occur in the monitoring setup such as noisy signals and detached sensors. In earlier works, a data reliability validation technique has been presented that gives information about the trustfulness of the calculated EWS. In this paper, we propose an EWS system enhanced with the self-aware property confidence, which is based on fuzzy logic. In our experiments , we demonstrate that-under adverse monitoring circumstances (such as noisy signals, detached sensors, and non-nominal monitoring conditions)-our proposed Self-Aware Early Warning Score (SA-EWS) system provides a more reliable EWS than an EWS system without self-aware properties.
Amir M. Rahmani
added a research item
In the era of Fog computing where one can decide to compute certain time-critical tasks at the edge of the network, designers often encounter a question whether the sensor layer provides the optimal response time for a service, or the Fog layer, or their combination. In this context, minimizing the total response time using computation migration is a communication-computation co-optimization problem as the response time does not depend only on the computational capacity of each side. In this paper, we aim at investigating this question and addressing it in certain situations. We formulate this question as a static or dynamic computation migration problem depending on whether certain communication and computation characteristics of the underlying system is known at design-time or not. We first propose a static approach to find the optimal computation migration strategy using models known at design-time. We then make a more realistic assumption that several sources of variation can affect the system's response latency (e.g., the change in computation time, bandwidth, transmission channel reliability, etc.), and propose a dynamic computation migration approach which can adaptively identify the latency optimal computation layer at runtime. We evaluate our solution using a case-study of artificial neural network based arrhythmia classification using a simulation environment as well as a real test-bed.
Amir M. Rahmani
added a research item
Smartphones and wearable devices, such as smart watches, can act as mobile gateways and sensor nodes in IoT applications, respectively. In conventional IoT systems, wearable devices gather and transmit data to mobile gateways where most of computations are performed. However, the improvement of wearable devices, in recent years, has decreased the gap in terms of computation capability with mobile gateways. For this reason, some recent works present offloading schemes to utilize wearable devices and hence reducing the burden of mobile gateways for specific applications. However, a comprehensive study of offloading methods on wearable devices has not been conducted. In this paper, nine applications from the LOCUS's benchmark have been utilized and tested on different boards having hardware specification close to wearable devices and mobile gateways. The execution time and energy consumption results of running the benchmark on the boards are measured. The results are then used for providing insights for system designers when designing and choosing a suitable computation method for IoT systems to achieve a high quality of service (QoS). The results show that depending on the application, offloading methods can be used for achieving certain improvements in energy efficiency. In addition, the paper compares energy consumption of a mobile gateway when running the applications in both serial and multi-threading fashions.
Amir M. Rahmani
added a research item
Falls can cause serious traumas such as brain injuries and bone fractures, especially among elderly people. Fear of falling might reduce physical activities resulting in declining social interactions and eventually causing depression. To lessen the effects of a fall, timely delivery of medical treatment can play a vital role. In a similar scenario, an IoT-based wearable system can pave the most promising way to mitigate serious consequences of a fall while providing the convenience of usage. However, to deliver sufficient degree of monitoring and reliability, wearable devices working at the core of fall detection systems are required to work for a prolonged period of time. In this work, we focus on energy efficiency of a wearable sensor node in an Internet-of-Things (IoT) based fall detection system. We propose the design of a tiny, lightweight, flexible and energy efficient wearable device. We investigate different parameters (e.g. sampling rate, communication bus interface, transmission protocol, and transmission rate) impacting on energy consumption of the wearable device. In addition, we provide a comprehensive analysis of energy consumption of the wearable in different configurations and operating conditions. Furthermore, we provide hints (hardware and software) for system designers implementing the optimal wearable device for IoT-based fall detection systems in terms of energy efficiency and high quality of service. The results clearly indicate that the proposed sensor node is novel and energy efficient. In a critical condition, the wearable device can be used continuously for 76 hours with a 1000 mAh li-ion battery.
Amir M. Rahmani
added a research item
The Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm holds significant promises for remote health monitoring systems. Due to their life- or mission-critical nature, these systems need to provide a high level of availability and accuracy. On the one hand, centralized cloud-based IoT systems lack reliability, punctuality and availability (e.g., in case of slow or unreliable Internet connection), and on the other hand, fully outsourcing data analytics to the edge of the network can result in diminished level of accuracy and adaptability due to the limited computational capacity in edge nodes. In this paper, we tackle these issues by proposing a hierarchical computing architecture, HiCH, for IoT-based health monitoring systems. The core components of the proposed system are 1) a novel computing architecture suitable for hierarchical partitioning and execution of machine learning based data analytics, 2) a closed-loop management technique capable of autonomous system adjustments with respect to patient’s condition. HiCH benefits from the features offered by both fog and cloud computing and introduces a tailored management methodology for healthcare IoT systems. We demonstrate the efficacy of HiCH via a comprehensive performance assessment and evaluation on a continuous remote health monitoring case study focusing on arrhythmia detection for patients suffering from CardioVascular Diseases (CVDs).
Amir M. Rahmani
added an update
Project goal
Quality of Experience (QoE) is a key metric for successful delivery of end-user services for IoT-enabled applications. Achieving consistent end-user QoE poses tremendous challenges in the face of resource constraints and dynamic variations at multiple scales of the IoT system stack: at the application, network, resource, and device levels. This proposal outlines a self-aware cognitive architecture – the Internet of Cognitive Things (IoCT) – that delivers acceptable QoE by adapting to dynamic variations in infrastructural compute, communication and resource needs, while also synergistically learning and adapting to end user behavior. The approach leverages edge (i.e., Fog) computing architectures to introduce intelligence and adaptability in integrated multi-scale IoT systems. The objective is to efficiently manage information acquisition, communication and processing across different scales of the IoT systems, while synergistically coupling learning of end-user behaviors to deliver efficient and customized services. The proposed IoCT system is the first example of architecture where a network of algorithms communicates and collaborates synergistically to achieve a system-wide objective. Cognition and edge computing architectures are leveraged to introduce intelligence and adaptability in integrated multi-scale IoT systems, through a Personal Holistic Cognitive Optimization (PHCO) framework. To this aim, the IoCT will adopt recently proposed learning and control techniques (i.e. Deep Q-Networks), and exploit self-awareness principles to achieve effective system optimization. The project leverages on-going collaboration with the Turku University Hospital to demonstrate a personalized ubiquitous healthcare framework using the Early Warning Score (EWS) system for human health monitoring. Healthcare spending accounts for almost 17% of the GDP in the US. In healthcare, effective monitoring and observation of patients plays a key role in detecting a deteriorating patient. This project’s exemplar application on efficient early detection of these life-threatening signs can potentially save lives through better quality of care, and timely delivery of critical/urgent health indicators. The framework and services are also applicable to a broad range of other IoT application domains.
Background and motivation
Quality of Experience (QoE) is a key metric for successful delivery of end-user services for IoT-enabled applications. Achieving consistent end-user QoE poses tremendous challenges in the face of resource constraints and dynamic variations at multiple scales of the IoT system stack: at the application, network, resource, and device levels. This proposal outlines a self-aware cognitive architecture – the Internet of Cognitive Things (IoCT) – that delivers acceptable QoE by adapting to dynamic variations in infrastructural compute, communication and resource needs, while also synergistically learning and adapting to end user behavior. The approach leverages edge (i.e., Fog) computing architectures to introduce intelligence and adaptability in integrated multi-scale IoT systems. The objective is to efficiently manage information acquisition, communication and processing across different scales of the IoT systems, while synergistically coupling learning of end-user behaviors to deliver efficient and customized services. The proposed IoCT system is the first example of architecture where a network of algorithms communicates and collaborates synergistically to achieve a system-wide objective. Cognition and edge computing architectures are leveraged to introduce intelligence and adaptability in integrated multi-scale IoT systems, through a Personal Holistic Cognitive Optimization (PHCO) framework. To this aim, the IoCT will adopt recently proposed learning and control techniques (i.e. Deep Q-Networks), and exploit self-awareness principles to achieve effective system optimization. The project leverages on-going collaboration with the Turku University Hospital to demonstrate a personalized ubiquitous healthcare framework using the Early Warning Score (EWS) system for human health monitoring. Healthcare spending accounts for almost 17% of the GDP in the US. In healthcare, effective monitoring and observation of patients plays a key role in detecting a deteriorating patient. This project’s exemplar application on efficient early detection of these life-threatening signs can potentially save lives through better quality of care, and timely delivery of critical/urgent health indicators. The framework and services are also applicable to a broad range of other IoT application domains.