Project

Interaction and Collaboration for Mathematics Learning in Diverse Classrooms

Goal: How can we design pedagogy to facilitate mathematics learning by paying attention to the role of language and students' identities? Toward this goal, I have been conducting video-based ethnographic studies in urban mathematics classrooms.

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Miwa Aoki Takeuchi
added 5 research items
This ethnographic study examined students’ opportunities to learn in linguistically diverse mathematics classrooms in a Canadian elementary school. I specifically examined the contextual change of group work, which influenced the opportunities to learn for newly arrived English language learners (ELLs). Based on analyses of video-recorded interactions, this study revealed a shift in these ELLs’ opportunities to learn from when they worked with teacher-assigned peers to when they worked with friends. In both settings, ELLs tended to be positioned as novices. However, when working with friends, they accessed a wider variety of work practices. In friend groups, ELLs were occasionally positioned as experts and had more opportunities to raise questions and offer ideas. In contrast, when working with teacher-assigned peers, ELLs tended to remain in the position of being helped. In some teacher-assigned groups, interactions were characterized as authoritative, and ELLs’ contributions and ideas were rejected or neglected without relevant justifications or mathematical authority established by their peers. The findings will contribute to ongoing discussions on group work and friendship in linguistically diverse classrooms. Available as advance online publication from http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/gbYwwQ3ziDYrjXNkp33W/ful
In this paper, I discuss the significance of classroom organization in English Language Learners' (ELLs) opportunities to participate in mathematics classrooms through a review of relevant contemporary literature. In particular, I will focus on the following areas of classroom organization: language organization, instructional organization, and discourse organization. By highlighting the relationship between classroom organization and English language learners' opportunities to participate in the mathematics classroom, I will provide insight into when and under which contexts ELLs are acknowledged (or not) with their existing resources.
This study examines teacher learning from the perspective of cultural–historical activity theory, which emphasizes the creation of new environments and new artefacts. This study focuses on elementary school teachers' learning over the course of professional development (PD) sessions for equitable mathematics teaching. Within the PD, the teachers created a student project that investigated linguistic diversity in the school community. Thematic analysis reveals that teachers' discourse relating to teaching mathematics to English language learners (ELLs) changed after the implementation of the inquiry project. More specifically, the discourse shifted from focusing on ELLs' barriers and challenges to highlighting what ELLs can do. This shift was coupled with a change in the classroom mathematics learning environment.
Miwa Aoki Takeuchi
added a project goal
How can we design pedagogy to facilitate mathematics learning by paying attention to the role of language and students' identities? Toward this goal, I have been conducting video-based ethnographic studies in urban mathematics classrooms.