Project

Inter- and transdisciplinary approaches to develop strategies for increasing the resilience of trees in growing cities and urban regions (GreenLung) [Inter- und transdisziplinäre Entwicklung von Strategien zur Erhöhung der Resilienz von Bäumen in wachsenden Städten und urbanen Regionen (GrüneLunge)]

Goal: Trees and urban forests mitigate heat-stress, purify air, and provide multiple other ecosystem services. They are often referred as the Green Lungs of city. However, urban trees and forests could be vulnerable to climate change impacts such as drought, heatwaves etc. Pollution from motor vehicles and other sources, mechanical damage from human activities could assert additional stresses on plants’ health and physiological activities.

In addition, rapid urbanization in growing cities (e.g. Karlsruhe) poses new challenge to maintain a sustainable green cover and healthy population of plants inside or near cities. In this context; increasing the awareness of citizens and involving civil society organizations and city administrations are vital for maintaining a green city with healthy trees and forests. There is an urgent need to develop an adaptation planning system for management of single trees and forested areas in urban region based on scientific evidence.

The aim of the BMBF Zukunftsstadt (“Future City”) project which was funded with 1.41 million Euro is to assess the ecological, social and economic resilience of urban tree species and forests by applying trans- and interdisciplinary approaches in urban regions of City Karlsruhe and City Rheinstetten. The project will be carried out by a transdisciplinary consortium in which ITAS has the leadership. Communal partners are the Cities of Karlsruhe and Rheinstetten; scientific partners, both located in Freiburg, are the Forest Research Institute of Baden-Württemberg (FVA) and the Research Centre Human Biometeorology (ZMMF) of the German Weather Service.

Together with FVA we will study the impacts of droughts, heatwaves, and pollution on the vitality of trees using dendroecological and ecophysiological approaches. In addition we will assess the potential of different tree species and forest types to mitigate heat stress in urban areas. For this purpose the ZMMF will carry out measurements and model calculations. Grounded on data obtained from these on-site measurements and from other data sources we will valuate multiple ecosystem services from urban trees and forests and develop strategies to reduce trade-offs between different types of ecosystem services.

We will apply transdisciplinary methods (e.g. Real World Lab “District Future – Urban Lab” of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) to increase the public awareness on the importance of a green city with healthy population of plants.

In German:

Bäume und städtische Wälder mildern die Belastung durch Hitze, filtern Luftverschmutzung und bieten vielfältige andere Ökosystemdienstleistungen. Sie werden oft als die „grüne Lunge“ der Stadt bezeichnet. Andererseits kann der Baumbestand durch die Auswirkungen des Klimawandels wie Trockenheit und Hitze, beeinträchtigt werden. Abgase des Autoverkehrs und anderer Quellen, sowie unmittelbare mechanische Beschädigung bewirken zusätzlichen Stress, der die Gesundheit und physiologische Aktivität der Pflanzen beeinflusst.

Die rasch zunehmende Urbanisierung durch wachsende Städte wie Karlsruhe stellt eine große Herausforderung für den Erhalt nachhaltiger Grünflächen und einer gesunden Pflanzenpopulation in der Stadt selbst und ihrer näheren Umgebung dar. In diesem Zusammenhang ist es wichtig, auch die Bewohner, gesellschaftliche Organisationen und die städtische Verwaltung mit einzubeziehen und das Bewusstsein gegenüber der „grünen Lunge“ der Stadt zu schärfen. Es besteht dringender Bedarf an der Entwicklung einer wissenschaftlich fundierten Anpassungsplanung für einzelne Bäume in der Stadt und urbane Waldflächen.

In dem mit 1,41 Millionen Euro geförderten BMBF-Zukunftsstadt-Projekt sollen inter- und transdisziplinäre Ansätze Verwendung finden, um die ökologische, soziale und ökonomische Resilienz von Bäumen in Karlsruhe und in direkter Nachbarschaft, in Rheinstetten, zu untersuchen. An dem Verbundprojekt nehmen außer dem ITAS, das die Federführung innehat, als kommunale Partner die Städte Karlsruhe und Rheinstetten teil. Wissenschaftliche Partner sind die Forstliche Versuchs- und Forschungsanstalt Baden-Württemberg (FVA) in Freiburg und der Deutsche Wetterdienst mit seinem ebenfalls in Freiburg beheimateten Zentrum für Medizin-Meteorologische Forschung (ZMMF).

Zur Bestimmung des Einflusses von Hitzewellen, Dürren und Luftverschmutzung auf die Vitalität der Bäume werden in Zusammenarbeit mit FVA dendroökologische und ökophysiologische Untersuchungen durchgeführt. Daneben soll das Potential der unterschiedlichen Baumarten und Forsttypen abgeschätzt werden, den Hitzestress in der Stadt abzumildern. Dazu werden vom ZMMF Messungen und Modellrechnungen durchgeführt. Auf der Basis der durch Messungen vor Ort gewonnenen und aus weiteren Datenquellen herangezogenen Daten werden die verschiedenen Ökosystemdienstleistungen der Bäume und städtischen Wälder bewertet und es werden Strategien entwickelt, Zielkonflikte („Trade offs“) zu verringern.

Transdisziplinäre Methoden finden im Reallabor „Quartier Zukunft – Labor Stadt“ des KIT Anwendung, wobei es vor allem darum geht, wie es gelingen kann, die Öffentlichkeit für die Wichtigkeit einer grünen Stadt mit einer gesunden Pflanzenpopulation zu sensibilisieren.

Date: 1 November 2018 - 31 October 2021

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Project log

Somidh Saha
added a research item
Increasing urbanization, climate change, and plant disease pose accumulative threats to city and community-owned forests (CCF). This requires the forest to adapt to new climatic conditions to continuously provide essential recreational functions for the urban population in the future. The COVID-19 pandemic increased the demand for CCF as a place to meet, play sports, and relax. However, our knowledge of challenges in combining climate change adaptation and the increased number of visits and demand for recreation in CCF management is yet limited. In this study, we, for the first time, interviewed 16 stakeholders from different backgrounds about their opinions on climate change adaptation (CCA) of CCF, its importance as a recreational space, and conflicts between the two fields of action that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is expected that comparing perspectives from different stakeholder groups can lead to improved reflection and strengthen the sustainable management of the CCF through knowledge-based and participative decision-making. Using semi-structured interviews and qualitative data analytics with MAXQDA software, we found that stakeholders particularly highlighted the importance of the recreational function of the CCF during the pandemic. At the same time, the behavior of visitors was criticized. We identified that functional conflicts between the need for relaxation and essential functions for CCA of the CCF have increased during the pandemic. These include other biodiversity and protective functions. The interviewees, therefore, suggested enhancing the local population's communication and education. Further, the possibility of increased visitor guidance has been discussed. It has been identified that more research and location-adjusted planning are needed to evaluate the use of non-native species for the urban forest’s climate change adaptation.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
Trees in cities provide multiple ecosystem services. However, simultaneously ensuring healthy trees with high habitat diversity can be challenging in a harsh urban environment. We compared health, microhabitats, and bat activities between native ( Quercus robur L.) and non-native ( Quercus rubra L.) oaks growing in different urban habitats (street vs. park) in Karlsruhe, southwestern Germany. We randomly selected 167 oak trees with a diameter at breast height (DBH) greater than 20 cm across the city from Urban Tree Registrar. We performed tree health assessment, dendrometric, and microhabitat inventory. We recorded the bat activities for four days on 45 native and non-native oaks with acoustic loggers installed on the trees. We found that non-native oaks were healthier than native oaks but provided less abundance and richness of microhabitats. Tree size (positive effect) and pruning (negative effect) strongly influence microhabitat richness and abundance. In addition, park trees hosted significantly more microhabitats than street trees. We recorded the activities of 9 bat species from 4 genera. Pipistrellus bats were more active in park trees than street trees. Long-eared bats ( Plecotus ) were more active near the native than non-native oaks. Bats are likely favored by microhabitats such as fork split, lightning scar, and woodpecker "flute" that are more common in less healthy trees. We conclude that non-native red oak can be planted alongside streets, where the conditions are harsher than in parks, to better adapt to climatic changes and stay healthy with less maintenance. The preservation of native pedunculate oak trees, especially within parks, is paramount for urban biodiversity conservation because of their potential to provide microhabitats and supporting bats.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
Key Message In an urban area, resistance and resilience of stem diameter growth differ substantially between tree species. Traffic emissions are reflected in wood nitrogen isotopes, but do not affect drought tolerance. Abstract With increasing drought and heat, the benefits of urban trees such as shading and cooling become more important. Yet, it is necessary to identify tree species able to withstand such extreme climatic conditions. We studied the resistance and resilience of stem diameter growth of five deciduous tree species in an urban area in Southwest Germany to three exceptional drought periods (2003, 2011 and 2015) for differences between and within species, especially considering the intensity of traffic emissions (NO x ). Analyses of the stable isotopic composition of carbon (δ ¹³ C) and oxygen (δ ¹⁸ O) as well as the intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUE i ) in the tree rings were carried out. Further, we investigated the stable isotopic composition of nitrogen in the wood (δ ¹⁵ N) to assess its potential as an indicator of NO x emissions from traffic. Stem diameter growth in all species was strongly limited by low water availability in spring, as was also reflected in elevated δ ¹³ C and δ ¹⁸ O values in Acer platanoides and Tilia cordata , which were particularly sensitive to drought. In contrast, growth of Platanus × hispanica and Quercus robur was less affected by drought, and resistance of Carpinus betulus ranged in between. Across species, δ ¹⁵ N was higher in trees located closer to roads and exposed to higher NO x traffic emissions. Unexpectedly, these conditions did not significantly affect drought resistance/resilience. Our study demonstrates the potential and interpretative challenges of coupled dendroecological and isotope analyses. It also indicates clear species-specific differences in drought tolerance and thus helps to identify suitable urban tree species.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
Reducing trade-offs among ecosystem services (ES) from urban and peri-urban forests (UPF) is crucial for human wellbeing. We performed spatial analyses and quantified the supply and trade-offs between 23 ES (grouped into three categories: provisioning, regulating, and supporting) from UPF in the Karlsruhe region, southwest Germany. The supply of ES was calculated, normalized, and mapped from field data collected at 201 randomly selected plots in UPF, located in agricultural land, built-up areas (i.e., artificial surfaces), and forest and seminatural areas. Trade-offs were calculated as the root mean squared error between the benefits from two categories of ES. Predominantly, there was a synergy between provisioning and regulating ES; however, trade-offs with supporting ecosystem services were detected in all three land-uses. The UPF areas with a high supply of supporting ES (e.g. tree species, structural and tree microhabitat diversity) had a lower supply of regulating and provisioning ES, resulting in trade-offs. This study demonstrates trade-off patterns between the ES in UPF, which should be considered in the management of UPF and sustainable city design. Current UPF should be transformed to a more multifunctional and climate-resilient state to guarantee ES and human wellbeing in cities.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
Differences in the accessibility to urban resources between different racial and socioeconomic groups have exerted pressure on effective planning and management for sustainable city development. However, few studies have examined the multiple factors that may influence the mitigation of urban green spaces (UGS) inequity. This study reports the results of a systematic mapping of access inequity research through correspondence analysis (CA) to reveal critical trends, knowledge gaps, and clusters based on a sample of 49 empirical studies screened from 563 selected papers. Our findings suggest that although the scale of cities with UGS access inequity varies between countries, large cities (more than 1,000,000 population), especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), are particularly affected. Moreover, the number of cities in which high socioeconomic status (high-SES) groups (e.g., young, rich, or employed) are at an advantage concerning access to UGS is substantially higher than the number of cities showing better accessibility for low-SES groups. Across the reviewed papers, analyses on mitigating interventions are sparse, and among the few studies that touch upon this, we found different central issues in local mitigating strategies between high-income countries (HICs) and LMICs. An explanatory framework is offered, explaining the interaction between UGS access inequity and local mitigating measures.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
In the times of enlarging cities and more people living in cities, it is essential to maintain the quality of life for everyone. Urban forests make a significant contribution to this. In urban areas, productive ecosystems are essential to maintain human health and well-being. However, problems like increasing urbanization, changing climate, and pollution in the air, water, and soil can endanger urban ecosystems like urban forests. Having or building resilient urban forests is seen as a possibility to maintain ecosystem services provided by urban forests. Under future conditions, they may become essential for human life in urban areas as some are critical for human health. This study is a literature review of past research dealing with resilience in urban forests. Forty-one articles published in the years 2006 to 2019 that complied with the search criteria were reviewed. Results show that only three articles used a definition of the resilience of urban trees after disturbance based on a formula; two articles used a definition of resilience based on natural ecosystems. The remaining articles did not define resilience while using the term in the articles.Out of the reviewed articles, four major themes were identified: urban forest management, urban biodiversity, urban soil, and socio-economic conditions. Nine articles included content about urban soils, 19 articles about urban forest management, 30 articles about urban biodiversity, and 11 articles about socio-economic conditions. As (built) urban forests in cities differ considerably from natural ecosystems, some authors rated monitoring and management actions as necessary, mainly for new establishments and the integration of new species. Authors expressed contradicting opinions on species richness. While some articles suggested focusing on native or endemic species, others proposed to increase species diversity to enhance urban forest resilience. Tolerances and resistances of tree species are essential for urban areas and may gain importance in the future, increasing extreme weather events leading to more frequent pest and disease outbreaks. Results indicated a focus on urban soil quality as a basis for plant growth, and tree health is an essential factor in urban forestry. Municipal authorities need to adapt management actions to create and maintain an urban forest to the benefits they intend to achieve for the city considering local conditions like climate, species pool, and specific resistances. At the end of the review, a framework recommends actions for a structured collaboration of municipal authorities, researchers, and citizens to achieve resilient urban forests.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
Cultural ecosystem services (CES) of urban and peri-urban forests (UPF) contribute to the urban population's health and well-being. However, UPF face numerous threats from increasing urbanization and climate change. A comprehensive understanding of the flow of the forests' CES between urban and peri-urban areas was lacking. Further, there is little empirical evidence of how people valued and used UPF during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we assessed residents' perceptions of CES provided by UPF, and their spatial distribution in Karlsruhe and Rheinstetten, Germany, using a participatory map-based questionnaire survey. Respondents (n=501) were asked to indicate five preferred locations of UPF and to rate the individual UPFs’ importance concerning various CES. Heatmaps were created to visualize the results, and normalized ratings of the perceptions were examined. The study demonstrated that residents prefer nearby locations for all studied CES but place a higher value on peri-urban forests regardless of their frequency of use. The survey results show an increase in visits to UPFs during the COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of urban forest for citizens’ stress reduction during the pandemic was highlighted by the participants. We recommend considering these findings in urban forest planning.
Somidh Saha
added a research item
Jede*r kann einen Beitrag zu Arten- und Klimaschutz durch Veränderungen im eigenen Garten leisten. Das ist die Idee der Kampagne, die in dem Projekt GrüneLunge konzipiert und in der Stadt Rheinstetten durchgeführt wird. Zu Beginn wurden Bürger*innen mit öffentlichen Veranstaltungen über naturnahe Gartengestaltung informiert. Im Anschluss werden 16 Haushalte bei der Umgestaltung ihrer Gärten über 1 ½ Jahre unterstützt und vernetzt. Schwerpunkte der Kampagne sind, Impulse für mehr Artenschutz in die Stadtgesellschaft zu senden und die Selbstwirksamkeit der Bürger*innen zu fördern. Aus den Ergebnissen der wissenschaftlichen Begleitforschung soll auch eine Handreichung für andere Kommunen entstehen.
Somidh Saha
added an update
There is a vacant position in my group. The deadline fror application is 28.02.2020.
Here is the details:
 
Somidh Saha
added an update
ITAS 10-19 Masterarbeit zum Thema: Ermittlung und Quantifizierung von kulturellen Ökosystemdienstleistungen von urbanen Bäumen und Wäldern in Karlsruhe und umliegenden Gemeinden
Tätigkeitsbeschreibung
Innerhalb des Projekts „GrüneLunge: Inter- und transdisziplinäre Entwicklung von Strategien zur Erhöhung der Resilienz von Bäumen in wachsenden Städten und urbanen Regionen“ soll eine Methodik entwickelt werden, um den Ausgleich von Ökosystemdienstleistungen von urbanen Bäumen und Wäldern zwischen der Stadt Karlsruhe und umliegenden Gemeinden zu beurteilen. Die Idee des Ausgleichskonzepts: Gemeinden wie Rheinstetten können der Stadt Ökosystemdienstleistungen bieten und im Gegenzug kulturelle Dienstleistungen oder finanzielle Entschädigungen für die Erweiterung oder den Erhalt der Grünflächen erhalten.
Ökosystemdienstleistungen werden entsprechend dem Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA, 2005) in vier Kategorien eingeteilt: 1) Bereitstellend, 2) Regulierend, 3) Unterstützend und 4) Kulturell. Untersuchungen zu Ökosystemdienstleistungen von städtisches Bäumen und Wäldern werden anhand der Vorgaben durch die Economics and Ecosystem of Biodiversity (TEEB) Initiative (Ring et al., 2010) und gemäß den “valueES” Guidelines (ValueES, 2017) durchgeführt.
Der Fokus der Masterarbeit liegt auf der Ermittlung und Quantifizierung von kulturellen Ökosystemdienstleistungen von urbanen Bäumen und Wäldern in Karlsruhe und umliegenden Gemeinden durch das Anwenden von qualitativen Methoden. Die Ergebnisse fließen in das Ausgleichskonzept ein.
Gegebenenfalls kann die Tätigkeit mit einer Hiwi-Tätigkeit verbunden werden. Die Masterarbeit sollte in Vollzeit am ITAS durchgeführt werden.
Ihre Aufgabe umfasst im Rahmen der genannten Themenbeschreibung:
  • Literatur-Recherche zum Status quo von Ökosystemdienstleistungen von Grünflächen und Bäumen
  • Ermittlung und Quantifizierung von kulturellen Ökosystemdienstleistung von städtischen Bäumen und Wäldern in Karlsruhe und Rheinstetten durch:
  • Literaturrecherche
  • Ggf. Online-Umfragen
  • Umfragen vor Ort
  • Ggf. weitere Methoden
Persönliche Qualifikation
  • Studierende der Fachrichtungen Forstwissenschaften, Geoökologie, Umweltwissenschaften oder ähnlicher Fachrichtungen
  • Wünschenswert: ein grundsätzliches Verständnis von qualitativen Methoden
  • Erfahrungen im Umgang mit MS Office-Anwendungen (Word, Excel, Outlook) und Literaturprogrammen (z.B. Citavi)
  • Fließende Deutschkenntnisse in Wort und Schrift sind verpflichtend, gute Sprachkenntnisse in Englisch sind wünschenswert
  • Zuverlässige, eigenverantwortliche und ergebnisorientierte Arbeitsweise
Organisationseinheit
Institut für Technikfolgenabschätzung und Systemanalyse (ITAS)
Eintrittstermin
1. April 2020
Vertragsdauer:         
Befristet, 6 Monate
Bewerbungsfrist:
1. Februar 2020
Eintrittstermin:        
ab 1. April 2020
Ansprechpartner:    
M. Sc. Annika Fricke, ITAS
Tel 0721/608-24707, E-Mail: annika.fricke@kit.edu
Dr. rer. nat. Somidh Saha, ITAS
Bewerbung
Bitte bewerben Sie sich online mit dem unten stehenden Button auf diese Stellenausschreibung Nr. ITAS 10-19. Im Personalservice (PSE) - Personalbetreuung ist zuständig:
Frau Schaber Telefon: +49 721 608-25184,
Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen
Bei entsprechender Eignung werden schwerbehinderte Menschen bevorzugt berücksichtigt.
 
Somidh Saha
added an update
A newspaper article on the status of trees and forests to heatwaves (see online: https://bnn.de/nachrichten/suedwestecho/hitzestress-im-wald-baeume-sterben)
 
Somidh Saha
added an update
Somidh Saha
added an update
Somidh Saha
added an update
The project was published as a news in the German newspaper Badische Neueste Nachrichten on 3rd May 2019
 
Somidh Saha
added an update
The project was highlighted in the State Gazette of Baden-Württemberg, Germany on 10th May 2019
 
Somidh Saha
added an update
News of the project published in ITAS-KIT's hompage on 21st March 2019, International Day of Forests:
 
Somidh Saha
added a project goal
Trees and urban forests mitigate heat-stress, purify air, and provide multiple other ecosystem services. They are often referred as the Green Lungs of city. However, urban trees and forests could be vulnerable to climate change impacts such as drought, heatwaves etc. Pollution from motor vehicles and other sources, mechanical damage from human activities could assert additional stresses on plants’ health and physiological activities.
In addition, rapid urbanization in growing cities (e.g. Karlsruhe) poses new challenge to maintain a sustainable green cover and healthy population of plants inside or near cities. In this context; increasing the awareness of citizens and involving civil society organizations and city administrations are vital for maintaining a green city with healthy trees and forests. There is an urgent need to develop an adaptation planning system for management of single trees and forested areas in urban region based on scientific evidence.
The aim of the BMBF Zukunftsstadt (“Future City”) project which was funded with 1.41 million Euro is to assess the ecological, social and economic resilience of urban tree species and forests by applying trans- and interdisciplinary approaches in urban regions of City Karlsruhe and City Rheinstetten. The project will be carried out by a transdisciplinary consortium in which ITAS has the leadership. Communal partners are the Cities of Karlsruhe and Rheinstetten; scientific partners, both located in Freiburg, are the Forest Research Institute of Baden-Württemberg (FVA) and the Research Centre Human Biometeorology (ZMMF) of the German Weather Service.
Together with FVA we will study the impacts of droughts, heatwaves, and pollution on the vitality of trees using dendroecological and ecophysiological approaches. In addition we will assess the potential of different tree species and forest types to mitigate heat stress in urban areas. For this purpose the ZMMF will carry out measurements and model calculations. Grounded on data obtained from these on-site measurements and from other data sources we will valuate multiple ecosystem services from urban trees and forests and develop strategies to reduce trade-offs between different types of ecosystem services.
We will apply transdisciplinary methods (e.g. Real World Lab “District Future – Urban Lab” of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) to increase the public awareness on the importance of a green city with healthy population of plants.
In German:
Bäume und städtische Wälder mildern die Belastung durch Hitze, filtern Luftverschmutzung und bieten vielfältige andere Ökosystemdienstleistungen. Sie werden oft als die „grüne Lunge“ der Stadt bezeichnet. Andererseits kann der Baumbestand durch die Auswirkungen des Klimawandels wie Trockenheit und Hitze, beeinträchtigt werden. Abgase des Autoverkehrs und anderer Quellen, sowie unmittelbare mechanische Beschädigung bewirken zusätzlichen Stress, der die Gesundheit und physiologische Aktivität der Pflanzen beeinflusst.
Die rasch zunehmende Urbanisierung durch wachsende Städte wie Karlsruhe stellt eine große Herausforderung für den Erhalt nachhaltiger Grünflächen und einer gesunden Pflanzenpopulation in der Stadt selbst und ihrer näheren Umgebung dar. In diesem Zusammenhang ist es wichtig, auch die Bewohner, gesellschaftliche Organisationen und die städtische Verwaltung mit einzubeziehen und das Bewusstsein gegenüber der „grünen Lunge“ der Stadt zu schärfen. Es besteht dringender Bedarf an der Entwicklung einer wissenschaftlich fundierten Anpassungsplanung für einzelne Bäume in der Stadt und urbane Waldflächen.
In dem mit 1,41 Millionen Euro geförderten BMBF-Zukunftsstadt-Projekt sollen inter- und transdisziplinäre Ansätze Verwendung finden, um die ökologische, soziale und ökonomische Resilienz von Bäumen in Karlsruhe und in direkter Nachbarschaft, in Rheinstetten, zu untersuchen. An dem Verbundprojekt nehmen außer dem ITAS, das die Federführung innehat, als kommunale Partner die Städte Karlsruhe und Rheinstetten teil. Wissenschaftliche Partner sind die Forstliche Versuchs- und Forschungsanstalt Baden-Württemberg (FVA) in Freiburg und der Deutsche Wetterdienst mit seinem ebenfalls in Freiburg beheimateten Zentrum für Medizin-Meteorologische Forschung (ZMMF).
Zur Bestimmung des Einflusses von Hitzewellen, Dürren und Luftverschmutzung auf die Vitalität der Bäume werden in Zusammenarbeit mit FVA dendroökologische und ökophysiologische Untersuchungen durchgeführt. Daneben soll das Potential der unterschiedlichen Baumarten und Forsttypen abgeschätzt werden, den Hitzestress in der Stadt abzumildern. Dazu werden vom ZMMF Messungen und Modellrechnungen durchgeführt. Auf der Basis der durch Messungen vor Ort gewonnenen und aus weiteren Datenquellen herangezogenen Daten werden die verschiedenen Ökosystemdienstleistungen der Bäume und städtischen Wälder bewertet und es werden Strategien entwickelt, Zielkonflikte („Trade offs“) zu verringern.
Transdisziplinäre Methoden finden im Reallabor „Quartier Zukunft – Labor Stadt“ des KIT Anwendung, wobei es vor allem darum geht, wie es gelingen kann, die Öffentlichkeit für die Wichtigkeit einer grünen Stadt mit einer gesunden Pflanzenpopulation zu sensibilisieren.