Project

Inclusive Evaluation

Goal: Researchers and evaluators are tasked to ensure representative samples in their work. Many populations are hard-to-reach and therefore make this task difficult. Designing studies to include all people, especially diverse, vulnerable, and hard-to-reach populations is vital to ensure valid results. Universal Design is essential to ensure that these populations are
fairly represented and included in the study process.

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Project log

June E Gothberg
added a research item
The purpose of this checklist is to provide support for program evaluators who design, develop, implement, and disseminate evaluations. The fifth edition brings in an update to include the best practices that have come from adjusting evaluation to virtual environments. This tool is designed to assist the evaluator to include all individuals in the evaluation process, people of all ages, cultures, and abilities. To do this, evaluators are encouraged to use the seven principles of Universal Design. Universal design asks from the outset how to make the design work beautifully and seamlessly for as many people as possible without the need for adaptations. It seeks to consider the breadth of human diversity across the lifespan to create design solutions that work for all users. This checklist is best implemented during the planning phase of the evaluation project in to ensure full participation for all populations.
June E Gothberg
added a research item
This Evaluation Toolkit represents the contributions of several individuals including staff and graduate students at Western Michigan University and the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT). These individuals were involved in the conceptualization, development, and review of the Evaluation Toolkit. Without their commitment and effort, the Evaluation Toolkit would not have been possible: Karen DeVries We also want to thank these state departments of education and local school districts who contributed evaluation examples to the Evaluation Toolkit: Arkansas Colorado Georgia Michigan New Mexico Oklahoma Utah Kiamichi region in Oklahoma, including the Durant and Hugo school districts, & Northeast Pryor region in Oklahoma Gallup-McKinley County Schools, New Mexico Grants-Cibola County Schools, New Mexico Weld Re School District, Windsor, Colorado Finally a big thank you to our higher education partners: New Mexico Highlands University University of Massachusetts, Boston University of North Carolina, Charlotte University of Northern Colorado University of Oklahoma University of Oregon Western Michigan University
June E Gothberg
added 2 research items
A Crosswalk of Universal Design for Assessment and Evaluation used to research the administration of assessments and design of evaluations.
The purpose of this checklist is to provide support for program evaluators who design, develop, implement, and disseminate evaluations. This checklist is designed to assist the evaluator to include all individuals in the evaluation process; people of all ages and all abilities. To do this, evaluators are encouraged to use the seven principles of Universal Design 1. "Universal design asks from the outset how to make the design work beautifully and seamlessly for as many people as possible. It seeks to consider the breadth of human diversity across the lifespan to create design solutions that work for all users". This checklist is best implemented during the planning phase of the evaluation project in order to ensure full participation for all populations. Principle One: Equitable Use The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.  To the greatest extent possible, the evaluation plan represents the participant population, known or anticipated, as staff, advisers, and/or co-researchers 2.  Evaluation plan prepares for locating diverse study participants and providing accessible recruitment materials.  Informed consent materials are simple and accessible with alternate forms available 3.  Informed consent materials allow participants to understand the plan for data use and dissemination.  Evaluation plan is transparent with all steps understood; including proper procedures for publishing for community, cultural, and tribal participants.  Evaluation plan is grounded in context with consideration for community and cultural appropriateness of methods used for gathering information.  Evaluation plan follows all IRB processes including community, cultural, and tribal protocols. Principle Two: Flexibility in Use The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities. Evaluation plan shows evidence of preparation to:  Communicate with participants of diverse abilities, communication styles, and cultural backgrounds.  Quickly solve problems in regards to individual needs 4.  Include a variety of data collection tools to accommodate communication preferences or needs 5.  Include extra time for participants with slower cognition or language barriers.  Include extra time to observe cultural practices. Principle Three: Simple and Intuitive Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user's experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level. Eliminate unnecessary complexity. Data collection instruments and materials:  Provide for different communication preferences or needs 6.  Are available to people with a variety of reading levels and backgrounds 7.  Use simple language, concrete questions, and show cultural competency 8.  Meet low vision and color blind requirements 9.  Are free from acronyms, jargon, slang, and colloquial terms. Principle Four: Perceptible Information The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user's sensory abilities.  Sensory issues are addressed 10.  Multiple media options are used to present information 11 .
June E Gothberg
added a project goal
Researchers and evaluators are tasked to ensure representative samples in their work. Many populations are hard-to-reach and therefore make this task difficult. Designing studies to include all people, especially diverse, vulnerable, and hard-to-reach populations is vital to ensure valid results. Universal Design is essential to ensure that these populations are
fairly represented and included in the study process.