Project

Impact of Terrorism

Goal: PhD Research into how societies respond to terrorist attacks.

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Project log

Jeanine De Roy van Zuijdewijn
added a research item
Many European countries have been the target of jihadist terrorist attacks between 2015 and 2017. While the chance of becoming a victim of a terrorist attack is low, terrorism scholars have emphasized that terrorism does not revolve around statistics and casualty numbers. Terrorists use attacks to reach an audience and affect groups beyond the direct victims. To this date, little is known about how terrorist attacks might affect the salience of terrorism beyond national borders. This paper investigates possible convergence of issue salience of terrorism among citizens within the European Union for ten jihadist attacks in the period 2015–2017 using Eurobarometer survey data. The results indicate that it is not simply a question of convergence or divergence of salience of terrorism after a terrorist attack. The connection is multidirectional and depending upon a variety of factors. Most importantly, we observed convergence on the EU-level, but divergence on the national level. This raises important questions about the transnationality of the effects of terrorism. As this research does not test nor find a causal mechanism and is solely dependent on existing data, further research is necessary to test some of its findings.
Jeanine De Roy van Zuijdewijn
added a research item
As terrorism scholars, we are intrigued by those who engage in violence. We study their motivations, tactics, ideology, organisational structures, and pathways to (de-)mobilisation, hoping to better understand terrorism and how we can counter it. Far less attention is paid to what happens after an attack has taken place. Terrorist attacks are means to an end; the responses to terrorism determine the impact attacks might have on societies. One way to better understand the impact of terrorism is by studying how societies deal with memories of terrorist attacks. This Perspective looks into the case of Norway following the attacks by Anders Behring Breivik on July 22, 2011. What can we learn about the societal responses to terrorism from how Norway commemorates the attacks and deals with the locations where these attacks have taken place? This perspective discusses the memorialisation process in Norway and then zooms in on a visit of the author to the island of Utøya in June 2019 in order to provide a more close-up look of how the members of the Workers' Youth League (AUF) have found their own ways to deal with the attacks.
Jeanine De Roy van Zuijdewijn
added an update
In July, I travelled to Nice to be present at the commemoration of the attacks during the Fête nationale in 2016 that killed over 80 people.
I am now continuing to work on the case of Nice, seeing how authorities and citizens have responded to the attacks, particularly looking at how they have attached meaning to what has happened in their rituals, symbols and speeches. More to follow...
 
Jeanine De Roy van Zuijdewijn
added a project goal
PhD Research into how societies respond to terrorist attacks.