Project

INTREE

Goal: INTREE aims to combine xylogenesis observations, tree-ring analyses, and quantitative wood anatomy, to link climate variations to xylem formation processes at different time scales, in order to determine how and when climate influences carbon sink activity in conifers

INTREE project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No H2020-MSCA-IF-2017-788951.

Date: 1 August 2018 - 31 July 2020

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Project log

Daniele Castagneri
added a research item
Drought will increasingly threaten forest ecosystems worldwide. Understanding how competition influences tree growth response to drought is essential for forest management aiming at climate change adaptation. However, published results from individual case studies are heterogeneous and sometimes contradictory. We reviewed 166 cases from the peer-reviewed literature to assess the influence of stand-level competition on tree growth response to drought. We monitored five indicators of tree growth response: mean sensitivity (inter-annual tree ring width variability); association between inter-annual growth variability and water availability; resistance; recovery; and resilience to drought. Vote counting did not indicate a consistent effect of competition on mean sensitivity. Conversely, higher competition for resources strengthened the association between water availability and inter-annual growth rates. Meta-analysis showed that higher competition reduced resistance (p < 0.001) and improved recovery (p < 0.05), but did not consistently affect resilience. Species, site and stand characteristics, and drought intensity were insignificant or poor predictors for the large variability among the investigated cases. Our review and meta-analysis show that competition does not affect the response of tree growth to drought in a unidirectional and universal way. Although density reduction (thinning) can alleviate growth declines during drought, the effects on growth after stress are uncertain. The large variability among investigated cases suggests that local-scale processes play a crucial role in determining such responses and should be explicitly evaluated and integrated into specific strategies for adaptation of forests to climate change.
Daniele Castagneri
added a research item
One of the most evident effects of the rapid warming occurring recently in cold and high-latitude forests is the lengthening of the growing season, with the concurrent extension of the period of wood formation. In addition, the increase of evapotranspiration demand is starting to induce drought-stress conditions. By selecting the same black spruce (Picea mariana) trees (20 trees in 4 sites along a latitudinal gradient in Quebec, Canada) where xylogenesis analyses were performed in the last years, we investigated long-term series of wood anatomical traits and compare them to previous short-term findings. Time series of wood anatomical traits were correlated to chronologies of daily temperature, VPD and precipitation during the period 1936-2010. In all sites, tracheid area correlated negatively with June-September temperature and VPD, and positively with precipitation. Meanwhile, cell-wall thickness and the number of cells per ring in the northernmost site were positively affected by spring and summer temperature. While previous monitoring studies evidenced temperature as the key climate variable influencing the timing of xylogenesis phases, our results show that water availability plays a central role in shaping xylem cell features in boreal black spruce. This stresses the importance of an integrate approach to better understand the relationships between wood formation and climate variability at both intra-annual and long (decadal) time scales. This approach will hopefully reduce the uncertainties and skewed interpretations of models on how boreal forest will perform in the future.
Daniele Castagneri
added 3 research items
The microsection images were processed with the image analysis software ROXAS (von Arx & Carrer, 2014) that provided the lumen area (LA), cell-wall thickness (CWT), and relative position within the dated annual ring for each tracheid within the dated tree ring.  6 mature larch trees were sampled at the tree-line (about 2200 m a.s.l.) on the southern exposed slope. Croda da Lago, eastern Alps  7 mature larch trees were sampled at the tree-line (about 2100 m a.s.l.) on the northeastern exposed slope.
Daniele Castagneri
added a research item
The effects of climate change on high‐latitude forest ecosystems are complex, making forecasts of future scenarios uncertain. The predicted lengthening of the growing season under warming conditions is expected to increase tree growth rates. However, there is evidence of an increasing sensitivity of the boreal forest to drought stress. To assess the influence of temperature and precipitation on the growth of black spruce (Picea mariana), we investigated long‐term series of wood anatomical traits on 20 trees from four sites along 600 km, the latitudinal range of the closed boreal forest in Quebec, Canada. We correlated the anatomical traits resolved at intra‐ring level with daily temperature, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and precipitation during the 1943–2010 period. Tree‐ring width, number of cells per ring and cell wall thickness were positively affected by spring and summer daily mean and maximum temperature at the northern sites. These results agree with the well‐known positive effect of high temperatures on tree ring formation at high latitudes. However, we captured, for the first time in this region, the latent impact of water availability on xylem traits. Indeed, in all the four sites, cell lumen area showed positive correlations with daily precipitation (mostly at low latitude), and/or negative correlations with daily mean and maximum temperature and VPD (mostly at high latitude). We inferred that drought, due to high temperatures, low precipitations, or both, negatively affects cell enlargement across the closed boreal forest, including the northernmost sites. The production of tracheids with narrower lumen, potentially more resistant to cavitation, could increase xylem hydraulic safety under a warmer and drier climate. However, this would result in lower xylem conductivity, with consequent long‐term hydraulic deterioration, growth decline, and possibly lead to tree dieback, as observed in other forest ecosystems at lower latitudes.
Daniele Castagneri
added a project goal
INTREE aims to combine xylogenesis observations, tree-ring analyses, and quantitative wood anatomy, to link climate variations to xylem formation processes at different time scales, in order to determine how and when climate influences carbon sink activity in conifers
INTREE project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No H2020-MSCA-IF-2017-788951.