Project

INTEGRIM – Integration and International Migration: Pathways and Integration Policies

Goal: INTEGRIM aims to establish a multi-site network of early stage researchers at eight partner institutions fostering a multidisciplinary research career on International Migration and Integration within the European context (www.integrim.eu).

Date: 1 January 2013 - 30 April 2017

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Stefano Piemontese
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Julius-Cezar MacQuarie
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Cite this chapter as: MacQuarie JC. (2021) The Researcher’s Nightworkshop: A Methodology of Bodily and Cyber-Ethnographic Representations in Migration Studies. In: Nikielska-Sekula K., Desille A. (eds) Visual Methodology in Migration Studies. IMISCOE Research Series. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-67608-7_16
Abstract
Migrants working the night shift (MWNS) have been invisible to the public eye for far too long. The failure to acknowledge the crucial role played by migrants working in the evening and night-time economy of developed societies is difficult to tackle with classical research tools alone. This chapter offers to novice and seasoned migration scholars a threefold methodological strategy to immerse, inhabit and to bring out of the dark a nocturnal landscape that has been invisible to diurnal people. The researcher’s nightworkshop’s innovative approach provides migration scholars with visual-analytical tools to capture the hidden experiences of MWNS. Theoretically, this chapter considers the broad aspects of representation (reel) and reality (real) of migrants in the public space and in migration scholarship. Night workers, the invisible people of the nocturnal city remain so to scholars, due to the impracticalities of doing nocturnal research (MacQuarie, 2019a). Empirically, therefore, the researcher’s nightworkshop’s strategy offers a solution to the puzzle of ‘invisibility’ of night shift workers. But it also reckons with the fact that to make visible the working lives in the realm of the night is a daunting task for scholars. Readers should interpret the notion of visibilisation with caution, using it as a visual metaphor to expose the factors that alter the night-shift workers’ precarious working conditions. This challenge is addressed here, through efforts that bridge the contingent of night workers, their minds and bodies that share the precarious landscape of nightwork with the researcher – alert and awake via the senses and suffering turned into skills.
 
Tina Magazzini
added a research item
The debate(s) on the relationship between art, activism and academia is as old as knowledge-production itself. In keeping with this volume’s focus on reflexivity and representation, this contribution asks what role filmmakers, curators and artists play as knowledge producers and as knowledge-brokers when working on politicized issues such migration and/or ethnicity. This chapter looks at three European experiences that sit on the seam of curatorial practice, testimony and activism and address the (visual) narratives of minority groups. Exploring the emergence of these initiatives and drawing upon interviews with the curators and artists behind them, this chapter takes stock of ongoing debates on the complex relationship between political and artistic representation on minority groups. Adopting Mitchell’s (1995) approach to representation that sees it as always being ‘of someone, by someone, to someone’, particular attention is given to the implications of what kind of stories are told, for whom they are told, and of who does the storytelling.
Tina Magazzini
added a research item
A raíz de la denominada “crisis migratoria” y su correspondiente respuesta en materia de políticas públicas, la libertad de movimiento en Europa se ha visto condicionada en gran medida por cómo de “problemático” es considerado un determinado grupo de migrantes en cuestión (en función de su diversidad cultural, estatus socioeconómico y estatus legal). En este contexto, los estudios sobre la gestión de la diversidad y la investigación de la migración y de la desigualdad han sido generalmente abordados por separado. Partiendo de la idea de que la literatura sobre estudios políticos podría beneficiarse de la incorporación de investigaciones sobre desigualdad y sobre la gestión de la diversidad en el campo de la migración, este capítulo parte del fenómeno de la “migración hacia el Oeste” de la población gitana para explicar cómo se generan y reproducen las tendencias de marginalización a través de las políticas de orientación étnica. La información utilizada ha sido obtenida de entrevistas realizadas a legisladores a cargo de las políticas de integración de la población gitana en España. Cuestionando cómo es entendido y abordado el asunto de la “migración de la población gitana” por aquellos responsables de crear políticas, este capítulo contribuye a un debate más amplio sobre las desigualdades complejas con el análisis de la redistribución, el reconocimiento y la representación en las políticas explícitamente dirigidas a la integración de la población gitana.
Julius-Cezar MacQuarie
added 2 research items
This article reports data collected during an ethnographic research project conducted in the New Spital¬fields wholesale night market in London. It foregrounds and analyses the portraits of two protagonists and triangulates them with data collected in the wider project. This micro analysis reveals that low-skilled workers (loaders, drivers, cleaners, servers) of the night market engage in physical labour tasks to main¬tain a 24/7 city’s economy appetite round-the-clock. The night workers’ somatic experiences, rhythmic bodily labour that constitutes the workers’ bodily capital, are discussed on the backdrop of challenges that they face while working the “graveyard” shift. The paper relays the workers’ individual characteristics, such as the physical and mental abilities to endure and embody the duress of night-shift work. This paper proposes that bodily exhaustion, alienation, and sleep deprivation are amongst the factors causing pre¬carious migrant night workers to become bioautomatons who are awake and working around the clock.
London's 24/7 rhythms throb with lives of nocturnal workers. The Sleepless Bats, whose nocturnal lives I have studied are bio-automatons remote from cooperating or from supporting each other in solidarity. Migrant night shift workers do something together but not with one another. Night shift workers survive precariousness because they are immune to co-workers' needs, and not because they offer each other mutual support out of humanness. Through the analytical lens of learned bodily knowledge, the study interrogated the modes of the embodiment that over time enhance night workers' social life skills. The becoming of embodied cooperation not only involves routinised, rhythmic practices ingrained in the body through repetitive, physical tasks, but also physical gestures that build social relations amongst workers who learn to engage meaningfully in dealing with ambiguity, resistance and difference. The relevant aspects of embodied forms of interaction investigated involve workers' trajectories being disrupted from naturally cooperative to socially competitive.
Kitti Baracsi
added a research item
In this study, the focus is put on the process by which the different educational actors – in this case mostly teachers – produce the image of Roma students and how a critical and engaged ethnography can show how ideas related to Roma culture, identity and integration play a role in the making of Roma students. Through this we can understand more thoroughly how the processes through which the categories that are meant to interpret the complexity of social processes or bring about positive changes become instruments that actually reinforce discriminative practices.
Sahizer Samuk Carignani
added a research item
This chapter deals with the issue of how policies and policy makers account for the integration of migrants whose stay is expected to be temporary. Temporary migration policies target those whose labour is wanted but whose integration is not. According to the international conventions regarding migrant workers, they should have the same access to social and economic rights as native workers. However, rights advocates point to the gaps between rights in theory and their implementation on the ground. This research is based on 53 semi-structured and in-depth interviews with policy-makers, migrant organisations, migrant lawyers, unions and migration research centres, conducted in Canada and the UK. The two countries have both implemented temporary migration programmes for seasonal and low-skilled workers. My analysis shows that, in both countries, temporary migration policies and temporariness hinder the integration of migrant workers. However, the two countries differ in their rhetoric regarding temporary migrant workers: Canadian policy-makers seem to be more self-critical and more inclined to have further solutions to temporariness, whilst UK policy-makers focus on a more functional perspective where temporariness is easily justified. I argue that this difference is at least partly due to the differential immigration histories of the two countries. Canada has a long history of welcoming immigrants, who are now part of the imagined community of nationals, whereas the UK is a post-colonial country where immigration policy has fluctuated in its liberalisation and restriction via temporary routes, visas and its five-tier points-based system.
Reinhard Schweitzer
added a research item
This open access book explores how contemporary integration policies and practices are not just about migrants and minority groups becoming part of society but often also reflect deliberate attempts to undermine their inclusion or participation. This affects individual lives as well as social cohesion. The book highlights the variety of ways in which integration and disintegration are related to, and often depend on each other. By analysing how (dis)integration works within a wide range of legal and institutional settings, this book contributes to the literature on integration by considering (dis)integration as a highly stratified process. Through featuring a fertile combination of comparative policy analyses and ethnographic research based on original material from six European and two non-European countries, this book will be a great resource for students, academics and policy makers in migration and integration studies.
Reinhard Schweitzer
added 5 research items
Immigration control is increasingly being extended from external borders to the interior of the state and society, and irregular residents in particular face policies that directly aim to prevent their settlement, integration and access to services. The British government explicitly presented these as an effort to create a ‘hostile environment’ for this segment of the population. In order to be effective, such policies have to be implemented within the core institutions of the liberal welfare state which, at the same time, fulfil a crucial role for the integration of society as a whole. Based on original interview data from London, this chapter looks at several sites where the exclusionary logic of immigration law intersects with various inclusionary logics underlying public service provision. Organisation theory helps to explain how and why different public institutions (hospitals, universities and local welfare departments) have responded to this by establishing specialised subdivisions that deal specifically with migrant irregularity. This development represents one of many ways in which the politics of (dis)integration can be institutionalised. While it allows welfare institutions to shield their core professional staff from contradictory logics and demands, it further increases the dangerous overlap between their own aim and function and those of the immigration system.
Reducing the number of foreigners residing unlawfully within the borders of a state requires either their removal or the legalisation of their presence within the territory. Increasingly, governments also employ measures of internal control and limit irregular migrants’ access to rights and services in order to encourage them to leave autonomously. This article aims to contribute to current debates on how to conceptualise and account for the agency that irregular migrants themselves exercise in such contexts. Within critical migration and citizenship studies, many of their everyday actions have been described as ‘acts of citizenship’ but also as instances of ‘becoming imperceptible’, neither of which captures the whole range of strategies irregular migrants employ to strengthen their fragile position vis-à-vis the state. I argue that conceptualising their agency in terms of (self-)integration allows us to account for both: practices through which they actively become political subjects as well as those that precisely constitute a deliberate refusal to do so. Empirically, this is underpinned by an analysis of recent policy developments in the United Kingdom and a series of semi-structured interviews I conducted during 8 months of fieldwork in London with migrants experiencing different kinds and degrees of irregularity.
What happens in institutions like schools or hospitals when local service provision overlaps with the control of national borders? Such overlap is unavoidable if unlawful residents are to be excluded from mainstream public services. With this explicit aim, governments not only modify the rules and established practices of welfare provision, but also encourage the people who administer and deliver these services to incorporate the logic of immigration control into their everyday work. To identify and better understand the concrete mechanisms that either help or hinder such internalisation of immigration control, this study systematically compares three spheres of service provision – healthcare, education and social assistance – across two distinctive legal-political environments: Barcelona/Spain and London/UK. Looking at official policies as well as their implementation, it primarily draws on a total of almost 90 semi-structured interviews with irregular residents, providers and administrators of local services, and representatives of NGOs and local government. Its innovative analytical framework helps to map and explain the significant variation in how immigration control works within different institutions and how individual actors occupying key positions in these can reproduce, contest, or readjust formal structures of inclusion and exclusion. While the way in which national – but also sub-national – governments frame and address irregular migration plays an important role, certain sectors of welfare provision and some categories of ‘street-level-bureaucrats’ are generally more likely to internalise immigration control than others. This reflects different degrees of professionalisation and individual discretion, but also attachment to different institutional logics and objectives. Drawing on organisation theory, the study also traces institutional responses to these external demands, which are key to understand the varying degrees of internal resistance. The thesis offers an original and empirically grounded perspective on the consequences and inherent limitations of internalised control and contributes to general debates on the effectiveness of immigration policy.
Stefano Piemontese
added a project reference
Stefano Piemontese
added an update
INTEGRIM members Amandine Desille and Franz Buhr co-organised the Imiscoe Spring Conference 2020 entitled “Moving, living, investing and surviving: housing and migrations in uncertain times”. The conference will be held at the University of Lisbon next February 6-7.
On this occasion, Sophie Hinger and Reinhard Schweitzer will also launch their recently published co-edited volume "Politics of (Dis)integration".
 
Tina Magazzini
added 2 research items
Roma populations have been part of European societies for centuries, yet they started to be perceived as a European “issue” in occasion of the 2004 and 2007 EU enlargement. In Eastern Europe several Roma, already struggling to cope with critical living conditions, fell into an ever-more negative spiral of deprivation as a result of the transition to an open market economy. The accession to the European Union eased internal migration of Roma from Central and Eastern Europe and triggered the emergence of problems associated with service provision of shelter, education and health. Meanwhile, those who found themselves in severe marginalized situations and could not afford to migrate began to be regarded as a “problem” for local authorities. The European Union has taken several soft policy actions to establish a framework for Roma integration, and has conditioned the use of structural funds to said strategies. The difficulty of implementing the National Roma Integration Strategy and of investing integration funds at the local level is however heavily affected by the lack of administrative capacity, political will, and practical obstacles. This chapter describes the EU efforts made in this field, focusing on the need to involve the local level through the concrete case of the ROMACT programme.
Integration is a term that can fittingly be included in what W. B. Gallie labelled ‘essentially contested concepts’, since it has become a key term in both academia and policy-making and yet can be used – as it is – for a variety of meanings. While usually understood to address the situation of migrants, it has also recently been applied to Roma minorities in Europe, the vast majority of whom are European citizens and a minority of whom have left their country of origin. This chapter builds upon a discourse analysis of the National Roma Integration Strategies in Italy and Spain and on interviews with the policy-makers in charge of them, in a bid to understand what the term ‘integration’ means for Roma minorities according to the authorities. Through this analysis, I show how the politics of (dis)integration can affect not only migrants but also ethnic minorities who are represented and treated as similarly ‘foreign’ to the mainstream’s imagined community. In this sense, Roma-specific integration policies do not challenge wider structures of inequality. Even if they are well intended, they can contribute to the normalisation of a hegemonic narrative that sees a certain section of society – namely a national middle-class white society – as the bar for normality.
Celine Cantat
added a research item
In this chapter, I reflect on the politics of in/visibility that underpin the government of migrants and refugees by Hungarian authorities and assess how they contribute to and authorise an on-going process of disintegration of the already narrow social, political and economic space navigated by migrants and refugees in the country. First, I examine the spectacularisation practices deployed by the Hungarian government in relation to migration and borders, with a focus on the series of anti-migrant campaigns and the construction of border fences since 2015. I explore the way in which this hyper-visible spectacle of migration produces particular representations of the Hungarian state as the protector of a national public. Second, I reflect on the way in which these hyper-visible ‘events’ authorise the deployment of quieter processes of negligence and destitution towards refugees and asylum-seekers that directly contribute to the disintegration of the social, economic and political ties which migrants and refugees may build in the country. Finally, I examine instances of solidarity initiatives with migrants and assess the extent to which they undermine the political frames put forward by the Hungarian government and produce common spaces between established residents and migrants. Ultimately, this chapter seeks to contribute to our understanding of politics of (dis)integration in Hungary, in the context of a highly exclusionary, yet contested, process of nation-building.
Sahizer Samuk Carignani
added a research item
This chapter deals with the issue of how policies and policy makers account for the integration of migrants whose stay is expected to be temporary. Temporary migration policies target those whose labour is wanted but whose integration is not. According to the international conventions regarding migrant workers, they should have the same access to social and economic rights as native workers. However, rights advocates point to the gaps between rights in theory and their implementation on the ground. This research is based on 53 semi-structured and in-depth interviews with policy-makers, migrant organisations, migrant lawyers, unions and migration research centres, conducted in Canada and the UK. The two countries have both implemented temporary migration programmes for seasonal and low-skilled workers. My analysis shows that, in both countries, temporary migration policies and temporariness hinder the integration of migrant workers. However, the two countries differ in their rhetoric regarding temporary migrant workers: Canadian policy-makers seem to be more self-critical and more inclined to have further solutions to temporariness, whilst UK policy-makers focus on a more functional perspective where temporariness is easily justified. I argue that this difference is at least partly due to the differential immigration histories of the two countries. Canada has a long history of welcoming immigrants, who are now part of the imagined community of nationals, whereas the UK is a post-colonial country where immigration policy has fluctuated in its liberalisation and restriction via temporary routes, visas and its five-tier points-based system.
Kitti Baracsi
added 2 research items
The chapter is based on the stories of young girls living in the informal camps of Neapolitan peripheries and it seeks to explore how the (mis)governance of the ‘Roma migration’ reproduces and gives place to gender inequalities. It also intends to examine how these young girls cope with their situation. A range of issues that are usually mentioned when talking about Roma adolescents, especially girls (e.g. early school leaving, early marriage, exploitation, trafficking, etc.), are addressed and analysed in the chapter mostly through the lens of education. The main thesis of this chapter is that these ‘gender-related’ problems are the outcomes of how the politically created image of Roma and the implementation of Roma policies intersect with the actual adaptation and resistance practices of these communities. Along these lines, it also addresses the responsibility of governance and the limits of those interventions that approach the ‘problems’ of Roma girls as something inherent in their communities’ social and cultural characteristics. On the other hand, it also questions those approaches that, through the appropriation and depoliticisation of the term ‘intersectionality’ and the womanisation of the ‘Roma issue’, tend to reproduce the described dynamics.
The city of Naples incorporates both migrant and Neapolitan actors in a complex system of diverse economies. The chapter shows the role of Roma migrants in the local economy and confronts it with the limits of policy discourses in considering Roma as economic actors. It enumerates interventions from the last few years that intended to position Roma as a 'resource' for the local economy. The analysis reveals discrepancies between these rather ad-hoc interventions and the general management of the 'Roma issue'; showing how diversity as a depoliticized concept and economy-based deservingness frames reproduce Roma as second-line citizens and racialized subjects in an ambiguous relation to informality. The chapter, looking at the multilevel (mis)governance of Roma migration, rereads the findings of ethnographic research on economic strategies in different Roma communities in the region of Campania.
Tina Magazzini
added a research item
This open access book presents a cross-disciplinary insight and policy analysis into the effects of European legal and political frameworks on the life of ‘Roma migrants’ in Europe. It outlines the creation and implementation of Roma policies at the European level, provides a systematic understanding of identity-based exclusion and explores concrete case studies that reveal how integration and immigration policies work in practice. The book also shows how the Roma example might be employed in tackling the governance implications of our increasingly complex societies and assesses its potential and limitations for integration policies of vulnerable groups such as refugees and other discriminated minorities. As such the book will be of interest to academics, practitioners, policy-makers and a wider academic community working in migration, refugee, poverty and integration issues more broadly.
Stefano Piemontese
added a research item
The idea for this book stemmed from two symposia that brought together scholars from a range of different countries and disciplines to reflect upon the political and legal context of the mobility of Romani citizens in Europe. Our interest in this topic started with the adoption of a EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies in 2011, when Member States were requested to develop integration strategies that were explicitly yet not exclusively targeted at their Roma populations (European Commission 2011). Even though this policy scheme represented an effort to overcome the inadequacies of the anti-discrimination directives to address the social and institutional discrimination suffered by Roma people in Europe, tangible results of such measures have so far been lacking. The symposia, titled “Roma Westward Migration in Europe: Rethinking Political, Social, and Methodological Challenges”, addressed the emergence of Roma-specific policies alongside an increasing concern about migration and diversity management. The drive to bring together different disciplinary and methodological approaches to “Roma migration” in Europe, and to explore how such phenomenon has been narrated, policed, politicized or ignored was – and is – rooted in four main considerations. Firstly, we are convinced that putting the focus squarely on the so-called “Roma westward migration” and problematizing the assumptions that underpin such a label contributes to uncover the structural inconsistencies of the European “Roma integration” framework and to question its overall political approach. Secondly, the intersections and overlaps between the categories of “Roma” and of “migrants” show how the classifications of deservingness and of access to welfare resources have shifted in recent years, making explicit the under-studied link between inclusive and securitarian policies. Thirdly, we believe that “Roma migration” provides a unique testing ground to understand how those portrayed as “the others” in contemporary Europe cope and develop counter-strategies in a system in which their options are limited. Fourthly and finally, we strongly support ethnographic accounts as a useful means to evaluate public policies at the local level, as they offer rich data that cannot be captured by national statistics or by surveys alone.
Stefano Piemontese
added a research item
The chapter addresses the "substantial social participation" of marginalised young people "on the move". Based on three ethnographic studies, this contribution looks into the potentials and limitations for social participation triggered by institutional agents. On the one hand, it illustrates how educational and socio-pedagogical settings enable adolescents to reposition themselves and build meaningful relationships within the broader society. On the other hand, the chapter shows how the the dynamics, processes, and relevant relational moments that shape the lives of young people "on the move" can be only capture if also the spatial dimension of personal life is considered.
Stefano Piemontese
added a research item
The thesis is a collection of articles, book chapters and working papers that investigate the experiences and the expectations of a group of Romanian Roma young people living in poverty between Madrid and a rural village in southern Romania. Their life stories seem to develop halfway between the reproduction of socio-economic inequalities and the challenge of social mobility. Based on a broader, multi-sited, collaborative ethnography, this work aims to unveil the interplay between structural constraints and individual agency that shapes the interaction between spatial, social and educational im/mobility in both transnational localities. The nexus between educational choices, housing problems and transnational mobility is considered in the broader context of both the policies for ‘Roma’ in Europe and the Spanish financial crisis.
Tina Magazzini
added a research item
The present chapter aims at describing the case of the Spanish Basque Country, one of Spain's seventeen regions, and how it has coped with its changing population over the past decades. The reason for scrutinizing this particular region is that it has introduced some policies and practices aimed at social inclusion that could—as will be argued—be usefully employed elsewhere to strengthen the social integration of European societies. In keeping with this volume's focus on practices of solidarity and migrant integration, the wider argument of this chapter is that such practices need not necessarily be aimed at the migrant population, in order to benefit migrants. The Basque case shows how, since migrants and refugees tend to be overrepresented in the most vulnerable sectors of society, inclusive welfare policies can function as useful temporary safety nets, when such policies do not exclude potential beneficiaries based on their nationality. The full volume is available in Open Access at https://www.feps-europe.eu/component/attachments/attachments.html?task=attachment&id=229
Stefano Piemontese
added a research item
The article investigates the youth transitions of a group of Romanian Roma adolescents with different im/mobility experiences but originating from the same transnational rural village. Their post-compulsory education orientations and development of autonomous im/mobility projects are anything but homogeneous; nevertheless, they all develop halfway between the reproduction of socioeconomic inequalities and the challenge of social mobility. While in Spain young migrants are confronted with severe residential and school mobility but have access to wider vocational training opportunities, their peers in Romania rely on more consistent educational trajectories, but face the prospect of poorly valued work in the local rural economy. As for young returnees, they struggle to mobilize their richer transnational social and cultural capital as a way of overcoming the negative experience and result of (re)migration. Based on broader, longitudinal, multi-sited and collaborative ethnography, this paper aims to unveil the interplay between structural constraints and individual agency that shapes meaningful interaction between spatial, social and educational im/mobility in both transnational localities. While emphasizing the usefulness of the concept of transition to explain the processes of intergenerational transfer of poverty in contemporary Europe, we discuss how temporality, social capital and mobility engage with the specific socioeconomic context, transformations, and imagined futures of its young protagonists.
Kingsley Lawrence Madueke
added a research item
Scholars of ethnic riots disagree on which are more susceptible to collective violence between ethnically segregated and diverse socio-spatial settings. Studies of riot-prone cities have produced contradictory conclusions. This article proposes that the ambivalence stems in part from disregarding the mobile nature of armed mobs and conflating their origins with their locations of violence. Drawing upon extensive ethnographic fieldwork involving mobile interviews, in-depth discussions and visual documentation, the article maps the footsteps of armed mobs from their origins to sites of confrontation during the  Christian-Muslim riots in Jos, Nigeria. Findings suggest both segregated and mixed settlements contributed to violence. While armed mobs were likelier to originate from segregated neighbourhoods, mixed settlements, especially those sandwiched between segregated ones, served as frontiers for fighting; armed mobs preferred narrow alleys inaccessible to security forces. These findings' implications can advance the understanding and management of ethnic riots in urban areas.
Julius-Cezar MacQuarie
added a research item
N!GHTWORKPOD: A PODCAST ABOUT WORKING THE N!GHT SHIFT LONDON’S, GLOCTURNAL CITIES’ ‘OTHER WORKERS’ SERIES | EPISODE Nº2 CREATOR | PRODUCER : Julius-Cezar MacQuarie | N!GHTSPARKS GUESTS : Georgina Perry , Public Health Practitioner | UK Phil Horsley , Fire Fighter | First Respondent | UK VOICE OVER : Natalia Carata, Actress | UK PEOPLE: Operations Manager, Professor, Outreach Workers, Se x Workers, Fire Fighthers PLACES : London, United Kingdom CHRONOLOGICAL PERIODS : Contemporary THEORETICAL APPROACHES : Ethnographic theory TOPICS : Night-Time Economy Capitalism, Globalisation Transnational Migration Sexual & Public Health Bodily Rhythms Circadian Rhythms Safety, Fire Fighting DISCIPLINES : Social Anthropology, Sociology UNIT: Centre of Policy Studies In this episode, I invite two pro-fessionals and long-term London residents, a public health practitioner and a fire fighter. Two important sectors of work, health and emer-gency services part of the fire fighting industry rely on professionals working the night shift through rotation. Both guests share how night shift work impacts on their circadian rhythms, and the chal-lenges that each face according to the nature of the job that they have preformed over the years.
Julius-Cezar MacQuarie
added a research item
NightWorkPod is a podcast about working the night shift and not about nightlife. However, it includes references to the latter in a global city that never sleeps, with its revellers and party-goers sustained and maintained night-by-night by those who work, at night - glocturnal people. The workers who appear in the NightWorkPod are the folks who keep these cities awake, spinning at an incessant speed and consuming round-the-clock, night-in, day-out.
Julius-Cezar MacQuarie
added a research item
The main theoretical contribution of this paper is to show that the transitional processes from circadian to post-circadian capitalist era have reduced capabilities for sociability of migrant night shift workers. It analyses the three main contributing factors to the corrosion of solidarity amongst migrant denizens: (a) the expansion of the working day into the night; (b) the major alterations of time over time, and the nurturing ground for these changes, (c) global cities, as the nurturing ground for occupational polarization. Key words: night work, migrant solidarity, global cities, post-circadian capitalism, precarity.
Julius-Cezar MacQuarie
added an update
This study was prepared in the larger framework of two projects: “The Changing Nature of Employment in Europe in the Context of Challenges, Threats, and Opportunities for Employees and Employers” (http://www.changingemployment.eu), and the “Integration and International Migration” initiative (http://www.integrim.eu). Both projects were Marie Curie Initial Training Networks funded by the Seventh Framework Program of the European Commission between 2012 and 2017.
 
Stefano Piemontese
added 15 research items
This article aims at exploring how ‘super-diversity’ can cover aspects of current debates that traditional ways of understanding identity and multiculturalism could not. I start by engaging with Gilles Deleuze’s differential ontology, which conceptualises difference as an inherent feature of identity and not some ‘issue’ brought by migration flows. I then outline super-diversity’s potential implications for diversity management, with particular attention to the case of Roma minorities in Europe. The main argument is that super-diversity can provide a promising framework to address some of multiculturalism’s constraints, if we focus on the new kind, rather than the new level, of complexity.
Tina Magazzini
added a research item
This article analyses how Roma are represented in official policy narratives in Italy and Spain by comparing the four cycles of the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities in the two countries. By tracing the representations that the Italian and Spanish governments hold (and make) about the Roma, I sketch out the different categories that EU‐ropean countries recur to as organizing principles to “other” underprivileged minorities. Based on the tailored‐approaches in which both Italy and Spain engage in framing Roma as either a “national” minority or not, I suggest that constructing or “producing” a minority in our imagined communities as characterized by national, cultural, social or migrant characteristics relies more on political expediency than on objective analytical categories.
Tina Magazzini
added a research item
Les migrations roms à l'international ont fortement contribué au cours des dernières années à « l'européanisation » de la problématique. Ce furent largement les réponses politiques apportées localement et nationalement à l'arrivée de ressortissants étrangers (néanmoins européens) qui poussa l'Union et les pays membres à adopter un cadre pour « l'intégration des Roms ». Cependant la reconnaissance de ces populations comme minorité transnationale, ou encore la mise en place au niveau européen de politiques redistributives fondées sur la prise en compte d'une ethnicité « rom », se révèlent à la faveur d'un regard sur les pratiques, non-exemptes d'incohérences. L'article propose d'éclairer et d'analyser ces questions à partir de l'étude de la situation espagnole et plus particulièrement de la manière dont les migrants roms (majoritairement originaires de Roumanie) s'inscrivent dans des cadres antérieurs dessinés en faveur des Gitanos, en même temps qu'elles interpellent les structures et dynamiques européennes.
Stefano Piemontese
added an update
Project goal
The INTEGRIM research training program (http://www.integrim.eu/) is a project funded by the EC-FP7 under the G.A 316796. It aims to establish a multi-site network of early stage researchers – predominantly PhD students – at the eight partner institutions fostering a multidisciplinary research career on International Migration and Integration within the European context. INTEGRIM is growing into a strong international network of young researchers who have brave questions, use innovative methods, apply a transnational perspective in their work, and collaborate with each other over physical and disciplinary distances.
Background and motivation
Integration is considered to be the most effective way to realise the potential of migration in the European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country Nationals, reinforcing the importance given to integration policies in previous documents, such as the Common Basic Principles for Immigrant Integration Policy in the EU, adopted by the Justice and Home Affairs Council in November 2004  and the subsequent Common Agenda for Integration adopted by the Commission in 2005. Moreover, integration appears as one of the first goals identified in the European.
In any case, plural societies need to develop a consistent knowledge base on integration, including not only the analysis of public policies in the field, but also paying special attention to social processes and potential roles for private actors. In this sense, integration is a substantial tool to achieve social cohesion in plural societies, where the respect and promotion of diversity as a parallel and guiding principle is also derived from a democratic and human rights-based perspective.
In this respect, integration is understood as a two-way process based on mutual accommodation by all immigrants and host societies of member states. This implies the need for active participation and open attitudes by both sides of immigration societies. On the one hand, it is the responsibility of the host society to ensure the right of immigrants and newcomers to full participation in the economic, social, cultural and political life of the country, ensuring the protection of these rights to the highest possible degree, within the framework of European common values and the international human rights standards in force. On the other hand, it is the responsibility of migrants and their communities to respect common values and European standards and to actively contribute, as far as reasonably possible, to the wellbeing and development of European societies.
When conceptualizing integration, Penninx goes beyond the accommodation process stressing the need for migrants to be accepted as part of society, namely in three analytically distinct dimensions: the legal-political one, the socio-economic one and the cultural/religious dimension.
In the context of the present research and training programme, we are considering processes and policies concerning the integration of foreign nationals within EU countries, including not only third-country nationals, but also EU citizens living in other member states, focusing specifically on groups that face difficulties with integration, such as Roma citizens.
 
Tina Magazzini
added 2 research items
The 2004 and 2007 EU Eastern enlargements facilitated the mobility of citizens from CEE countries, including European citizens of Roma ethnicity, which in turn contributed to the Europeanization of the 'Roma issue'. This article examines the politics of Roma ethnicity by giving a concise, yet we hope comprehensive, overview of how recent Roma migrations from EU Member States (particularly from Romania) to Spain can be understood and analysed in relation to both pre-existing policies for the Spanish Gitano communities and to wider European dynamics and structures.
This article aims at problematizing the relation between identity recognition, economic redistribution, and political representation in the debate around Roma inclusion in contemporary Europe. Given that culture has increasingly become politicized, by analyzing the emergence of the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture I reflect on the political and economic potential and drawbacks that cultural identity holds in a European society in which capitalism has turned into a cultural trait.
Stefano Piemontese
added a project goal
INTEGRIM aims to establish a multi-site network of early stage researchers at eight partner institutions fostering a multidisciplinary research career on International Migration and Integration within the European context (www.integrim.eu).