Project

IMPRODOVA - Improving Frontline Responses to High Impact Domestic Violence

Goal: IMPRODOVA aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of HIDV first line responders and will deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative trainings for European police organizations, as well as medical and social work professionals to improve and integrate institutional response to HIDV. This will create a positive feedback loop, which increases reporting rates of HIDV to police, and the medical profession, community and social work practitioners who act as the first responders and agents HIDV victims' of risk assessment.

Project website: www.improdova.eu
Twitter (@improdova): https://twitter.com/improdova
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/improdova/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/improdova-project-7067791a6/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC998cREyGoT--daViEII2fQ

Date: 1 May 2018 - 31 August 2021

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Project log

Catharina Vogt
added 5 research items
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits andcollaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequaterisk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
Lúcia G Pais
added a research item
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
Hera Gabor
added a research item
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
Bettina Pfleiderer
added 3 research items
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
The monograph on improving the response of first responders to domestic violence in Europe aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of first-line responders and deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative training for European police organizations and medical and social work professionals. The goal is to improve integrate institutional response to domestic violence. Shared training and adequate risk assessment tools will create a positive feedback loop, increasing reporting rates of domestic violence to police, the medical profession, and community and social work practitioners.
Lúcia G Pais
added a research item
When studying the current Portuguese domestic violence landscape, some police professionals highlighted the case of Porto as a different approach to domestic violence occurrences. We discovered an organisational experience involving a broad partnership and an evident interest in the media. Corresponding to the IMPRODOVA 2 Conceptual framework, the Porto experience merges both an organisational arrangement from the Public Security Police, which involves intra-organisational cooperation and inter-organisational cooperation between the police, several NGOs, health services, and public prosecutor services. Altogether, they aim to clarify the problem at hand, goals and stakes, resources and actors involved. In this article, the case study of the Porto experience is presented and discussed within broad critical thinking about social changes in contemporary societies.
Lúcia G Pais
added 2 research items
When studying the current Portuguese domestic violence landscape, some police professionals highlighted the case of Porto as a different approach to domestic violence occurrences. We discovered an organisational experience involving a broad partnership and an evident interest in the media. Corresponding to the IMPRODOVA 2 Conceptual framework, the Porto experience merges both an organisational arrangement from the Public Security Police, which involves intra-organisational cooperation and inter-organisational cooperation between the police, several NGOs, health services, and public prosecutor services. Altogether, they aim to clarify the problem at hand, goals and stakes, resources and actors involved. In this article, the case study of the Porto experience is presented and discussed within broad critical thinking about social changes in contemporary societies.
Catharina Vogt
added an update
Bettina Pfleiderer
added a research item
Health professionals are often the first point of contact for victims of domestic violence and thus play a major role in the detection and intervention of domestic violence. Interviews with professionals from the medical sector within the IMPRODOVA project indicated that they are not sufficiently trained in domestic violence and that they are not aware of their role as frontline responders in cases of domestic violence. It also became clear that interagency collaboration was lacking. IMPRODOVA designed therefore training formats and materials not only for the health sector, but also for the police and the social sector to improve frontline responders' competencies to prevent, investigate and mitigate domestic violence. In this article, we are introducing the IMPRODOVA online training platform with a focus on the medical sector.
Monica Fagerlund
added a research item
Official police records and victimisation surveys are key sources of information on domestic violence. One of the first tasks in the international IMPRODOVA project, with an overall aim to improve frontline response to domestic violence, was to examine the properties and availability of these data provisions across eight partner countries. The established theoretical perspectives to examine domestic violence - feminist and family violence perspectives -accompanied by their methodological implications for data collection are reviewed. Project data are examined utilising enhanced analytical strategy. The results indicate substantial variation and deficiencies in national data provisions; the foremost problem being the lack of representative and regularly repeated victimisation surveys. Concerning police data, regionally separate information systems and the potential unreliability of the data present the biggest challenges for examining domestic violence and its frontline response. The differences in what is considered 'domestic' and 'violence', as well as the weight given to gender in defining these concepts, are evident, creating substantial obstacles for international cooperation in research, policy formation and innovations to prevent and mitigate domestic violence. The paper aims to spark conversation for further development of policy and practice on collecting appropriate and comparable data concerning domestic violence.
Bettina Pfleiderer
added a research item
For victims of domestic violence, medical problems in the short-term are injuries and in the long-term health issues such as mental health problems, consequences of untreated sexual transmitted diseases or stress-related health issues evolving from the abuse they've experienced by a partner or any other family member. This inevitably makes victims seek the help of the medical profession sooner or later. The medical profession is therefore an important stakehold-er in the group of frontline responders detecting and intervening domestic abuse. Unfortunately , the medical profession is often not an active partner in frontline responder networks based on interviews (n = 296) we conducted in the IMPRODOVA project 1. In this article, problems cutting medical professionals out of the networks of frontline responders and reasons why they should be integrated are presented. The paper also discusses what needs to be changed in order to better integrate the medical profession in the circle of frontline responders working against domestic violence.
Catharina Vogt
added 2 research items
Subject of evaluation: https://training.improdova.eu/en/training-modules-for-the-health-sector/module-6-international-standards-and-legal-frameworks-in-europe/3/#How-guidelines-are-formed
Catharina Vogt
added an update
The IMPRODOVA team launched a new training video for medical (and other) frontline responders managing domestic abuse.
The video introduces the fictional domestic abuse case of 'Rita'. It shows how the cooperation with other professionals can look to support Rita best.
Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/hHXGYEJTR2o
 
Catharina Vogt
added 3 research items
Subject of evaluation: https://training.improdova.eu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/IMPRODOVA_Risk_Assessment_Integration_Module-1.pptx
Subject of examination: https://training.improdova.eu/en/
Lúcia G Pais
added a research item
When studying the current Portuguese domestic violence landscape, some police professionals highlighted the case of Porto as a different approach to domestic violence occurrences. We discovered an organisational experience involving a broad partnership and an evident interest in the media. Corresponding to the IMPRODOVA 2 Conceptual framework, the Porto experience merges both an organisational arrangement from the Public Security Police, which involves intra-organisational cooperation and inter-organisational cooperation between the police, several NGOs, health services, and public prosecutor services. Altogether, they aim to clarify the problem at hand, goals and stakes, resources and actors involved. In this article, the case study of the Porto experience is presented and discussed within broad critical thinking about social changes in contemporary societies.
Catharina Vogt
added an update
The Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act was described as a ‘gold standard’ in legislation to tackle domestic abuse when it passed the Scottish Parliament, creating a new offence to criminalise coercive control. As we pass the two year anniversary of this new legislation coming into force, the IMPRODOVA team at the University of Glasgow blog about our emerging understanding of how the legislation is working, and whether it is living up to its promise.
 
Catharina Vogt
added an update
The IMPRODOVA conference “Improving Frontline Responses to High Impact Domestic Violence” (IMPRODOVA@IPVI) will be held virtually on 09 June 2021.
IMPRODOVA@IPVI is linked with the “Interpersonal Violence Interventions - Social and Cultural Perspectives Conference” (IPVI) and is organized to contribute to the theme of the annual meeting by highlighting social and cultural perspectives on interventions in cases of domestic abuse and violence.
At the event we will share research findings and innovative approachesaround dealing with domestic violence with a focus on laws, data, risk assessment, case documentation, training and interagency cooperation. The 16 IMPROROVA partners from academia and practice from eight European countries (AU, FR, FI, GE, HU, PT, SC, SL) will present our project results. IMPRODOVA@IPVI offers both presentations and discussion sessions.
Agenda:
12:40 DIGITAL ARRIVAL
01:00 WELCOME
01:10 – 01:45 KEYNOTE _ Albin Dearing, European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights
Interagency cooperation to tackle high impact domestic abuse:
Why is it needed and state of the art
01:45 – 02:00 INTRODUCTION _ Objectives & achievements of the IMPRODOVA project
02:00 – 02:40 SPOTLIGHT_on the modules:
ž - IMPRODOVA Policy Development Module
ž - IMPRODOVA Integration Module of Risk Assessment Marianne Mela
ž - IMPRODOVA National Response Platform Pilot (@Catharina Vogt)
ž - IMPRODOVA Training Platform Bettina Pfleiderer
02:40 – 03:00 BREAK
03:00 – 03:50 parallel BREAK-OUT SESSIONS & open forum
ž * DV Risk Assessment Catharina Vogt & Dora Szego
ž * DV Training Bettina Pfleiderer
ž * Best practices on inter- and intra-agency cooperation Thierry Delpeuch &
03:50 – 04:30 IMPRODOVA – the European Echo:
Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia
04:30 – 04:50 DISCUSSION _ Possibilities for utilizing IMPRODOVA results in your country
04:50 – 05:00 Summary, conclusion and FAREWELL
 
Oona Brooks
added 3 research items
The new social reality imposed by COVID-19 brings particular concerns for women and children living with domestic abuse and sexual violence, and for the support services that they rely upon. Social distancing and self-isolation are likely to compound the risks, anxieties and fear experienced by victim-survivors, while limiting access to vital support agencies and safe community spaces. Indeed, isolation is a tactic used by perpetrators to facilitate and sustain abuse, and is recognised as such by the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act 2018.
Catharina Vogt
added an update
Warm invitation to our FOLLOWER & PEERS MEET IMPRODOVA event! Save the date, May 18, 2:00-3:00 pm CET, and let’s exchange ideas on how domestic abuse can be managed and where our research should go next. More info will be posted soon.
 
Private Profile
added 2 research items
Our study, which was compiled within the framework of the IMPRODOVA program, introduces existing on-the-ground risk assessment procedures and quality assessment instruments in respect to case documentation and their use by the police, the medical profession, and other frontline responders.
THE IMPLEMENTATION OF INTERNATIONAL NORMS AND NATIONAL BEST PRACTICES OF FRONTLINE RESPONDERS TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Ljubljana, Slovenia (8 April 2020) IMPRODOVA is a European H2020 research and innovation project concerning human factors shaping responses to domestic violence. The project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 787054. The project studies responses to domestic violence (DV for short) in eight European countries: Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, Scotland, and Slovenia. IMPRODOVA aims to improve and integrate the response of police, social work, health and non-governmental organizations, and other actors making up the ecosystem of frontline responders to DV. International organizations have defined a set of minimum standards that governments and service providers should achieve and implement in order to meet the international obligation to exercise due diligence to investigate and punish acts of violence, provide protection to victims and prevent DV. There are international standards for service providers in general and law enforcement in particular (but not specifically for NGOs or medical doctors). The foundations from which the essential standards are developed encompass confidentiality, safety, security, and respect for service users, accessibility, and availability. Support for DV victims should be available free of charge, and interventions should employ the principles of empowerment and self-determination. Service providers should be skilled, gender-sensitive, have ongoing training and conduct their work under clear guidelines, protocols, and ethics codes and, where possible, provide female staff. Each service provider should maintain the confidentiality and privacy of the victim and should co-operate and co-ordinate with all other relevant services. It should monitor and evaluate service provision, seeking the participation of service users. The expertise of specialized NGOs should be recognized. The research interviews were carried out in at least two locations in each partner country (in Germany, interviews were conducted in three locations). The researchers conducted 296 interviews in total, with interviews involving police officers, social workers, medical staff, and members of non-governmental organizations. Forty-one interviews from Austria, 44 interviews from Germany, 35 interviews from Finland, 48 interviews from France, 32 interviews from Hungary, 26 interviews from Portugal, 30 interviews from Scotland, and 34 interviews from Slovenia, were included in the analysis. The main finding of this part of the IMPRODOVA research is that international standards are relatively well implemented in all the partner countries. Based on the analysis, we can conclude that police have the power to enter private property, arrest, and remove a perpetrator. Protection or restraining orders are available for police to tackle all forms of DV. Police agencies co-ordinate with, and refer to, specialist support services for domestic victims well, and that all analysed police organizations have protocols on information sharing on DV with other agencies. The IMPRODOVA partners also found that some areas require special attention in the future since gaps between the international standards and the actual practice were discovered. Police personnel should be better trained on all aspects of DV, victims should be seen as soon as possible by a specially trained officer, and there should be at least one specialized officer per police unit, for DV and sexual violence. The comparison of the case studies in the eight partner countries yields many lessons, but one sticks out: frontline responders who are specialists of domestic violence serve the needs of victims in a better way than frontline responders who are generalists. By “specialist,” we mean police officers (or social workers, or medical professionals) whose job specialty consists of handling domestic violence cases. “Generalist” refers to those police officers (or social workers, or medical professionals) who handle all the cases that they encounter in their work. The critical variable, therefore, is whether victims make themselves known to specialists or generalists. In some countries, such as Hungary, Slovenia, or Portugal, virtually all police officers on the frontline response to domestic violence are generalists. In other countries, such as Scotland and Finland, the most frontline response is made by specialists. In France, Germany, and Austria, it varies according to locations, with some places served with specialized units and others with only generalists. Beyond necessary discussions on territorial equality, the pattern that the IMPRODOVA team has identified about specialists and generalists proves true both in cross-country comparison and within-county differentiation. Where victims’ point of contact with the frontline response to domestic violence is with generalists, police discretion comes into play in the determination of the level of help that the victim will receive. Police discretion is inherent to police work, but in the case of domestic violence, discretion has been analysed over the 1980s as a critical factor in the under-servicing of domestic violence victims, with police officers traditionally tending to consider domestic violence as a private family concern, and not as the crime that is. Discretion means the quality of service depends on the quality of the particular individuals who are working that day and not on the quality of the organizational processes that are implemented to ensure higher standards of service. The results reveal that generalists typically tend to think of domestic violence as severe when in the form of physical violence, at the expense of a broader definition that encompasses psychological harassment, marital rape, financial abuse, and other non-physical forms of violence against women. Typically, generalists justify the focus on severe physical violence by pointing at the question of evidence (such as visible injuries or medical certificates) and may develop negative stereotypes about victims (“they always withdraw their complaint”). Results revels that also social workers who lack training and specialization may develop these negative stereotypes, too. In some countries, older officers tend to cling to outdated stereotypes, compared to younger officers. Generalists usually are overworked because of the variety of requests that they face; they have no time for partnerships. Where victims’ point of contact with the frontline response to domestic violence is with specialists, their experience is typically different. Even there is a varying quality to the service provided by specialists and specialized units, in general, the IMPRODOVA team finds that specialists are well trained and have more experience. They are more likely to be able to ensure prompt and suitable treatment of uncomplicated cases routinely and to manage more complex and technical cases. Their organizational structure reflects an advanced process of division of labour (e.g. the Scottish case and the task-sharing in the Scottish police between the local, divisional, and national levels). Specialists are more capable of correctly interviewing the victim, of appropriately filling case documentation, of giving the correct advice to the victim, of appropriately orienting the victim to support structures. This is manifest from the Finnish, German, and Scottish cases. Being specialized in one type of crime, specialists do not face the problem of managing conflicting priorities—a problem typical of generalists. They usually have more reasons (and perhaps more time) to attend additional training, academic workshops, and to visit NGOs. They play the role of internal and external experts for DV prevention and investigation (towards nonspecialized police officers, NGOs, public administrations). Specialized units also are more likely to work in close partnerships with other types of professionals, for instance, the embedded social worker at the police station (French case). Partnerships of police officers with social workers enable specialized units to focus on their core professional specialties and to delegate other tasks to other specialists. Social workers who take care of the social needs of victims (housing, children, access to poor relief) allow police officers to focus on investigations and procedural aspects of the case (Finnish case). The fact that the social worker operates at the police station facilitates information sharing and exchange of views on DV situations. The social worker can be present during the interview of the victim by investigators. In Scotland, Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences assemble professionals from different sectors (including housing and education) to make sure that every angle of the victims’ concerns is addressed.
Bettina Pfleiderer
added 2 research items
A wide range of standardised risk assessment tools for high impact domestic violence has been developed, but their usage varies across European countries and between different frontline responders. While general risk assessment aspects are covered by most, the coverage of specific sex and gender aspects is still lacking. This article discusses, based on the results of the IMPRODOVA project, why sex and gender aspects need to be integrated in risk assessment tools and presents recommendations about initial approaches.
Catharina Vogt
added an update
Insights from research and practice here (open access):
CREOGN (2019). Violences intrafamiliales: Entre volonté et réalité. Revue de la gendarmerie nationale. N° 265. Limoges: CREOGN. Download: https://www.gendarmerie.interieur.gouv.fr/crgn/Publications/Revue-de-la-gendarmerie-nationale/Revue-N-265
 
Catharina Vogt
added an update
Can MARACs be "imported" to France? Jean-Marc Jaffree discusses this in an open access publication (English and French version).
Jaffré, J.-M. (2019). Are Britain's MARACS an exportable model? Note du CREOGN, 41, 1-4. Retrieved from https://www.gendarmerie.interieur.gouv.fr/crgn/Publications/CREOGN-Research-Note/Are-Britain-s-MARACs-an-exportable-model
Jaffré, J. M. (2019). MARAC : quels risques pour les victimes de violences intrafamiliales ? Note du CREOGN, 41, 1-4. Retrieved from https://www.gendarmerie.interieur.gouv.fr/crgn/Publications/Notes-du-CREOGN/MARAC-quels-risques-pour-les-victimes-de-violences-intrafamiliales.
 
Lúcia G Pais
added an update
Martta October
added 2 research items
Tämä väkivaltakäsitteiden sanasto on Terveyden ja hyvinvoinnin laitoksen (THL) väkivalta-ja sanastoasiantunti-joiden yhteistyössä laatima sanasto, joka sisältää määritelmät suositeltavimmille väkivallan vastaisessa työssä käytettäville käsitteille. Jos väkivaltailmiön käsitteitä ei ole yhteisesti määritelty, emme välttämättä ymmärrä toi-siamme, vaikka puhuisimme samasta asiasta. Sanaston tarkoituksena on tukea asiantuntijoita ja ammattilaisia keskustelemaan väkivallasta yhdenmukaisin termein ja jakamaan ymmärryksen siitä, mitä niillä tarkoitetaan. © Kirjoittajat ja Terveyden ja hyvinvoinnin laitos | Helsinki 2019 ISBN 978-952-343-211-6 (verkko), 2323-363X (verkko), http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-952-343-211-6 www.thl.fi
Catharina Vogt
added an update
To support professionals in assessing the risk for high impact domestic violence, the IMPRODOVA team developed a Risk Assessment Integration Module and a Risk Assessment Checklist.
 
Catharina Vogt
added an update
On this website IMPRODOVA provides training materials on domestic violence separate for the police, health sector and social sector:
Languages are English and German.
 
Catharina Vogt
added an update
Why do people mistakenly assume that domestic abuse is not a serious problem in our society? This explanatory IMPRODOVA video gives an overview of typical reasons. It also explains, how you can help a victim to become a survivor of domestic abuse:
Further languages are:
 
Catharina Vogt
added an update
Catharina Vogt
added an update
This flyer gives a nice overview on what the EU-funded IMPRODOVA project is about.
 
Catharina Vogt
added a research item
This research report presents findings from eight European countries (Austria, Finnland, France, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia) on best practices of intra- and inter-agency cooperation when managing domestic abuse cases.
Catharina Vogt
added a research item
The cooperation of agencies as first responders to domestic abuse has attracted increased interests among researchers. Recent international guidelines, particularly the Istanbul Convention, prescribe such networking between law enforcement, local support agencies, social services, health care and other relevant professionals as a precondition for improved response towards crimes committed in families and intimate relationships. The article describes the urgency to combat domestic abuse by means of interagency cooperation, and continues with a description of the Istanbul Convention, and explains the basic dimensions of such cooperation, e.g., concerning referrals between responder agencies. The article concludes with a brief overview of present research activities in the field by a project carried out by 16 partners. The project ‘IMPRODOVA’ runs from 2018 to 2021 and is funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 programme. Please cite as: Vogt, C. (2020). Interagency Cooperation. European Law Enforcement Research Bulletin, (19), 153-163. Retrieved from https://bulletin.cepol.europa.eu/index.php/bulletin/article/view/412
Lúcia G Pais
added an update
Lúcia G Pais
added an update
Lúcia G Pais
added an update
Lúcia G Pais
added a project goal
IMPRODOVA aims to identify gaps in the cooperation of HIDV first line responders and will deliver recommendations, toolkits and collaborative trainings for European police organizations, as well as medical and social work professionals to improve and integrate institutional response to HIDV. This will create a positive feedback loop, which increases reporting rates of HIDV to police, and the medical profession, community and social work practitioners who act as the first responders and agents HIDV victims' of risk assessment.
Project website: www.improdova.eu
Twitter (@improdova): https://twitter.com/improdova