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History of the Hathorn Davey Company, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK

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Robert W. Vernon
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Hathorn, Davey was a successful Leeds (West Yorkshire, United Kingdom) engineering company in the 19th and 20th centuries that rapidly gained a reputation for the manufacture of reliable and efficient steam pumping engines. The company started in 1872 as a means for a retired Scottish Army Captain, John Fletcher Hathorn, to give his half-brother a worthwhile career. A year later, a young engineer Henry Davey, joined the Partnership. Davey was to become probably one of the most innovative engineers in pumping technology of the period, and it was his patent of a new type of steam engine governor, the differential gear, together with its application to the two-cylinder Compound Engine, that gave the Company worldwide fame. Other innovations followed including a low-steam pressure domestic or safety motor that Davey used at his house at Headingley, Leeds. The Compound Engine was the Company's bestseller in the 19th century, and a number of those engines survive in the United Kingdom at Ebbw Vale, South Wales, Cheddars Lane Technology Museum, Cambridge and the Mill Meece Pumping Station, Staffordshire. In the 20th century, the Triple Expansion Engine superseded the Compound, and was exported to Uruguay and Australia. There are examples in both countries. In the United Kingdom working Triple Expansion Engines can be found at Twyford, Hampshire and the London Museum of Water and Steam. By 1900 the Company had come under the Directorship of the influential Lupton family of Leeds, and in 1901 the partnership converted to a private company. However, like many companies in the 1930s, Hathorn Davey fell on hard times and it was taken over by Sulzer Brothers of Switzerland in 1936. They retained the name Hathorn Davey as a dormant company until 2016. 'Hathorn, Davey of Leeds' is a detailed history of a engineering company, located in the Hunslet area of Leeds, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom. The first few chapters describe the establishment of the Sun Foundry where the Company was based. From 1872, the foundry was operated by a number of partnerships, led by John Fletcher Hathorn, a Scottish Landowner. Henry Davey was made a partner 1874 and Hathorn, Davey eventually appeared as the Company's title. Davey was responsible for a number of original innovations that contributed to the firm's excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. Eventually their steam pumping engines were exported all over the world. The 366 page book is amply illustrated (170 illustrations) with examples of the engines and pumps that the Company produced, together with minimal explanations of the technology taken from a variety of patents, and technical journals. The Hathorn, Davey Orders Books provide a common thread throughout the book. The book concludes with two appendices that provide details of the Order Books and the many patents taken out by Henry Davey................................... Now available from Moorebooks https://www.moorebooks.co.uk............................. and Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hathorn-Leeds-Manufacturers-Pumping-Machinery/dp/183836210X/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Hathorn%2C+Davey&qid=1612000185&sr=8-2
Robert W. Vernon
added an update
Hathorn, Davey of Leeds Manufacturers of Steam Pumping Machinery 1872 to 2016
will be published at the end of January 2021 - 366 pages. 170 Illustrations
ISBN 978-1-8383621-0-2
Chapters include
Chapter 1: Introduction 1
Chapter 2: The Sun Foundry 9
Chapter 3: Carrett and Marshall 15
Chapter 4: Hathorn, Davis and Campbell: 1872 23
Chapter 5: Henry Davey 31
Chapter 6: The Differential Expansive (Compound) Pumping Engine 41
The Differential Gear 42
The Compound Engine 47
Chapter 7: Hathorn, Davis, Campbell and Davey: 1874 to 1877 53
Chapter 8: Hathorn, Davis and Davey: 1877 to 1878 67
Chapter 9: Hydraulic Engines and Pumps 77
Chapter 10: Hathorn, Davey and Company and a new Partner 85
Chapter 11: Hathorn, Davey and Company: The International Market 97
Chapter 12: Hathorn, Davey and Company: The European Market 105
Chapter 13: Davey's Domestic Safety Motor 115
Chapter 14: Hathorn, Davey: The late1880s and more Partnership changes 125
Chapter 15: Hathorn, Davey and the South Staffordshire Mines Drainage Commission 133
Chapter 16: Henry Davey and the London Office 141
Chapter 17: Triple Expansion Steam Engine 153
Chapter 18: Compound Engines and their remains in the 1890s 165
Chapter 19: The Inverted Vertical Compound Engine 177
Chapter 20: The Sun Foundry: 1872 to 1900 187
Chapter 21: Hathorn, Davey and Company, Limited and the Lupton Family 197
Chapter 22: The Limited Company: 1900 to 1914 209
Chapter 23: Sales of the Compound Engine: 1900 to 1914 219
Chapter 24: Triple Expansion Engines: 1900 to 1914 229
Chapter 25: Engines and Pumps sold in Britain: 1900 to 1914 241
Chapter 26: Hathorn, Davey during World War I 253
Chapter 27: Hathorn, Davey in the 1920s 263
Chapter 28: The Staff and Workforce 273
Chapter 29: Engine Sales in the 1920s 283
Chapter 30: The 1930s: Lack of Orders 293
Chapter 31: Receivership, and a possible Take-Over 303
Chapter 32: Sale to Sulzer Brothers 309
Chapter 33: Hathorn, Davey: Part of Sulzer Brothers of Switzerland 317
Appendix 1: Hathorn, Davey Order Books 327
Appendix 2: Henry Davey's Patents 329
Index 333
 
Robert W. Vernon
added an update
During the Corona virus lockdown I have been writing a book on the history of this very important British engineering company. They supplied pumping machinery to mainly mines and waterworks worldwide, and many examples of their engines, some still working, exist mainly in England, Australia, and South America. See
 
Robert W. Vernon
added a research item
Hathorn Davey Ltd. was an engineering partnership established in 1872 at the Sun Foundry, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK. The company manufactured reliable pumping machinery for collieries, waterworks, drainage schemes, and an award winning low-pressure steam engine for use at farms, and mansions. The company was taken over by Sulzer of Switzerland in 1936. As the company's reputation grew so did their markets. Henry Davey, a well-regarded engineer with over 70 patents to his name, promoted the company, and eventually they exported heavy duty pumping machinery to most parts of the world. Ten engines were supplied to the Miike Coalfield, and two to the Yawata Steel Works, Kyūshū, Japan, for example, whilst the mining consultancy firm of John Taylor and Sons (London), ordered machinery for their gold mines at Kolar, India and Waihi, New Zealand. Hathorn Davey also sold engines (including a man-engine) to the Brillador and San Carlos mine, Coquimbo, Chile. Water and sewage treatment works were also major buyers, for example at Odessa and Montevideo. It is not surprising that the majority of surviving Hathorn Davey engines can be found on such sites, for example Spotswood, Melbourne and Charters Towers, Queensland. Many examples survive in the United Kingdom. The archived company records (1872 to 1920) are located in the West Yorkshire Records Office, Leeds, UK, and are essentially in two forms, legal (company operations) and engineering (relating to specific orders). There are 22 order books that can be cross-reference to sketch books, which list all drawings for that order. Once the drawing number is known it is possible to search for the original engineering drawing, if it still exists. The paper provides a brief history of the Company, with examples of engines and associated structures that survive worldwide, and illustrates the online database available on Researchgate, which itemises each order, engine type and size, cost and purchaser.
Robert W. Vernon
added a research item
Hathorn Davey Ltd. was an engineering partnership established in 1872 at the Sun Foundry, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK. The company manufactured reliable pumping machinery for collieries, waterworks, drainage schemes, and an award winning low-pressure steam engine for use at farms, and mansions. The company was taken over by Sulzer of Switzerland in 1936. As the company's reputation grew so did their markets. Henry Davey, a well-regarded engineer with over 70 patents to his name, promoted the company, and eventually they exported heavy duty pumping machinery to most parts of the world. Ten engines were supplied to the Miike Coalfield, and two to the Yawata Steel Works, Kyūshū, Japan, for example, whilst the mining consultancy firm of John Taylor and Sons (London), ordered machinery for their gold mines at Kolar, India and Waihi, New Zealand. Hathorn Davey also sold engines (including a man-engine) to the Brillador and San Carlos mine, Coquimbo, Chile. Water and sewage treatment works were also major buyers, for example at Odessa and Montevideo. It is not surprising that the majority of surviving Hathorn Davey engines can be found on such sites, for example Spotswood, Melbourne and Charters Towers, Queensland. Many examples survive in the United Kingdom. The archived company records (1872 to 1920) are located in the West Yorkshire Records Office, Leeds, UK, and are essentially in two forms, legal (company operations) and engineering (relating to specific orders). There are 22 order books that can be cross-reference to sketch books, which list all drawings for that order. Once the drawing number is known it is possible to search for the original engineering drawing, if it still exists. The paper provides a brief history of the Company, with examples of engines and associated structures that survive worldwide, and illustrates the online database available on Researchgate, which itemises each order, engine type and size, cost and purchaser.
Robert W. Vernon
added a research item
The records of the Hathorn Davey Company, Ltd, Sun Foundry, Leeds, are lodged in the West Yorkshire Record Office, Nepshaw Lane South, Morley, Leeds LS27 7JQ. The archive can be essentially divided into two. 1. The Dibb Lupton Collection contains the formal documents relating to the operations of the company, and cover for example, profit / loss, patents etc. 2. The Hathorn Davey engineering records that were lodged by Sulzer (who took over the company in 1936) cover the production work of the company up to 1920. This is by far the most important, and largest, portion of the Hathorn Davey archive. It consists of Order Books (indexed apart from book 11), books listing sketches per order, and an incomplete record of sketches.
Robert W. Vernon
added a research item
The presentation is a brief history of the Hathorn Davey Company, Leeds, a major manufacturer of mine pumping engines. Two Hathorn Davey engines still exist in the Sir Frances Level, (Gunnerside Gill, Swaledale) just to the west of where the Conference took place.
Robert W. Vernon
added 4 research items
Between 1883 and 1899 the Mitsui Company, owners of the Miike Collieries, situated at Ōmuta, Fukuoka Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan, ordered ten pumping engines, from Hathorn, Davey and Company, Limited, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. The following notes have been compiled to provide details of the various Hathorn Davey engines at Miike in preparation for a visit to the Miike Collieries on the 30th March 2017 to examine what physical evidence might remain of the engines installations.
In 1907, the Takata Company, Osaka ordered two triple expansion pumping engines from Hathorn Davey and Company, Limited, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, to pump water from the Onga River to the Yawata Imperial Steel Works, Fukuoka Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan. The following notes were prepared prior to a visit to the Onga River pumping installation on the 28th March 2017. They provide details of the Hathorn Davey triple expansion engines installed at the Onga River Pumping Station, Nakama City, and compares them to a similar engine at Spotswood, Melbourne, Australia.
Between 1883 and 1894 the Solana silver-lead mine, situated in the far north of Córdoba Province, Spain, nine kilometres to the north-east of the town of Belalcázar was worked by three British Companies. The first of the companies, ordered two pumping engines in 1883 from Hathorn Davey and Company, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. As part of the ongoing research into the history of the Hathorn Davey Company, and British involvement in Spanish mining, it is proposed to visit the Solana mine site on the 27th September 2017 to examine the remains on the site, and more particularly the buildings associated with Hathorn Davey machinery. These notes are prepared for Spanish colleagues who will be in attendance on that visit