Project

HCI@I4.0 - Human Computer Interaction Perspectives on Industry 4.0

Goal: Today we are facing a new era of industrial automation and interconnection which drives the transition of human workplaces. New technologies but also novel business processes lead to a shift of worker related requirements at the data-intensive manufacturing workplace on the shop floor or in knowledge-intensive maintenance field operations. HCI research is already dealing with these new challenges by developing and providing practical assistance solutions which bring together again the power of industrial automation with the flexibility of human intelligence.

With HCI@I4.0 we want to develop best practice examples and derive lessons learned from researching and rolling out novel methods and technologies for worker focused assistance under industrial conditions. The aim is to bring together scientific excellence from multiple fields and industrial demands in a vivid dialog. Therefore, HCI@I4.0 encourages scientists in the field of manufacturing, production management, computer science and psychology to participate with their scientific contribution and to provide interesting stimuli as well as research insights. Vice versa it focuses on the industrial audience which searches for answers and partnerships in todays’ discussion of emerging Industry 4.0 terms and claims.

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Mario Aehnelt
added an update
This was this years DAEM2 workshop at the PETRA conference in Corfu, Greece! We had 12 inspiring talks on different aspects around the designing of assistive environments for manufacturing. Meanwhile our community is growing and we started making plans for DAEM3! Thank you for sharing your research and ideas with us!
 
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
We're proud to announce the
DAEM2 Workshop: The 2nd International Workshop on Designing Assistive Environments for Manufacturing
co-located with the 11th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments (PETRA) in Corfu, Greece from June 26-29, 2018
Currently, a fundamental change is happening in manufacturing, transforming the practice of running independent manufacturing units to the implementation of networked cyber-physical systems. The digitalization of industrial production, often referred to as Industrie 4.0 (Industry 4.0), lays the groundwork for more flexible and efficient ways of producing goods. This new approach is often highly complex, putting strains on the operators and supervisors of such systems. Hence, new research questions related to the assistance of humans in the industrial context arise:
  • How do technologically-enhanced systems affect the work in the domain of manufacturing in the long run?
  • Are assistive manufacturing environments a temporary tool for people to acquire new skills?
  • Or do the systems change manufacturing work and processes fundamentally?
Further, we are interested in how the workers are using such assistive systems for the workplace. Most importantly, how can we design new assistive systems for workplaces that are extending the state of the art?
However, DAEM2 is not only concerned with the development of new technology; rather we want to learn about the implications that new technology in the manufacturing context has on its users, the work, and society in general. This workshop aims to continue the discussion with researchers and professionals related domains. The main goals of this workshop are assessing the current state of the art, providing possibilities for collaboration across researchers, and formulating research questions related to the design of assistive environments for manufacturing.
Topics
  • Concepts
    • New interaction concepts for assistive environments
    • Combining cognitive and physical assistance at the workplace
    • Tools and design techniques
    • Transfer of HCI concepts into industrial practice
  • Applications of Assistive Technology
    • For stationary or mobile assembly tasks
    • For monitoring or controlling cyber-physical systems
    • Assistance through Human-Robot Collaboration
    • For learning and education
    • Assistive systems for special needs
  • Technologies and Devices
    • Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality
    • Projection-based interfaces
    • Mobile and wearable devices
    • Haptic Enhancement of Digital Experiences
  • Methodology
    • Usability and user experience of assistive environments in industry
    • Evaluation methods
    • User and cognitive models
  • Others
    • Social and ethical aspects
    • Technological acceptance
Organizers
Deadlines
The workshop deadlines are available here: http://petrae.org/cfw.html
Workshop Website
 
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
IxD&A special issue on:
Human Computer Interaction Perspectives on Industry 4.0
Guest Editors
  • Ralf Klamma, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
  • Viktoria Pammer-Schindler, Graz University of Technology, Austria
  • Mario Aehnelt, Fraunhofer IGD, Rostock, Germany
Important dates
  • Deadline: April 30, 2018
  • Notification to the authors: June 10, 2018
  • Camera ready paper: June 30, 2018
  • Publication of the special issue: end of July, 2018
Overview
Information technologies in the form of networked things, automation, data analytics and artificial intelligence allow for evolutionary and revolutionary progress in industry (Industry 4.0). On this focus day we connect technical and human factors aspects by discussing deep learning as one of the game changing algorithms, methods and technologies for Industry 4.0, and the impact on how industrial work will be conducted in the future.
Topics of Interest
The seven main scientific topics considered in this special issue are:
  • Cognitive support and cognitive automation for human understanding and decision processes
  • Visual support by augmented or virtual reality for complex data or knowledge-intensive work tasks
  • Smart learning or situated learning for a professional and self-regulated work life in production and assembly
  • Data usability for workers supporting intuitive handling of complex and heterogeneous data
  • Division of work between humans and machines in the Industry 4.0. What are the capabilities of computers? What should be done by humans? What are the unique competences of humances and machines?
  • Mobile assistence for supportin human on the shop floor. Potentials, challenges and visions for flexible, mobile assistance systems
  • Experience of workers with new technologies in smart industrial environments
Submission procedure
All submissions (abstracts and later final manuscripts) must be original and may not be under review by another publication.
The manuscripts should be submitted anonymized either in .doc or in .rtf format.
All papers will be blindly peer-reviewed by at least two reviewers. Perspective participants are invited to submit a 8-20 pages paper (including authors' information, abstract, all tables, figures, references, etc.).
The paper should be written according to the IxD&A authors' guidelines (http://www.mifav.uniroma2.it/inevent/events/idea2010/index.php).
(when submitting the paper please choose Domain Subjects under: 'IxD&A special issue on: ‘Human Computer Interaction Perspectives on Industry 4.0')
For scientific advices and for any query please contact the guest-editor:
marking the subject as: 'IxD&A special issue on: Human Computer Interaction Perspectives on Industry 4.0''.
 
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
The Internet of Things is changing the world of working. Machines, plants and even products get connected to form cyber-physical systems. While the new technologies enable more flexible and efficient ways of producing goods, the new practice is often highly complex for the operators and supervisors of such systems. This workshop will take place as part of the 7th International Conference on the Internet of Things in Linz, Austria (October 22 -25, 2017). With it we want to discuss new questions for research in human-computer-interaction (HCI) and design that are a result of the development of an IoT. Be part of it!
 
Markus Funk
added 3 research items
In this work, we introduce a novel setup for an augmented workplace, which allows for defining and interacting with user-defined tangibles. State-of-the-art tangible user interface systems equip both the underlying surface and the tangible control with sensors or markers. At the workplace, having unique tangibles for each available action results in confusion. Furthermore, tangible controls mix with regular objects and induce a messy desk. Therefore, we introduce the concept of user-defined tangibles, which enable a spontaneous binding between physical objects and digital functions. With user-defined tangibles, the need for specially designed tangible controls disappears and each physical object on the augmented workplace can be turned into a tangible control. We introduce our prototypical system and outline our proposed interaction concept.
Due to increasing complexity of products and the demographic change at manual assembly workplaces, interactive and context-aware instructions for assembling products are becoming more and more important. Over the last years, many systems using head-mounted displays (HMDs) and in-situ projection have been proposed. We are observing a trend in assistive systems using in-situ projection for supporting workers during work tasks. Recent advances in technology enable robust detection of almost every work step, which is done at workplaces. With this improvement in robustness, a continuous usage of assistive systems at the workplace becomes possible. In this work, we provide results of a long-term study in an industrial workplace with an overall runtime of 11 full workdays. In our study, each participant assembled at least three full workdays using in-situ projected instructions. We separately considered two different user groups comprising expert and untrained workers. Our results show a decrease in performance for expert workers and a learning success for untrained workers.
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
The submission deadline of the i-KNOW conference and thus of our workshop "Human Computer Interaction Perspectives on Industry 4.0" has been extended until the 3rd of July! We're looking forward for your contributions.
 
Markus Funk
added a research item
These days, customers can choose and configure nearly every detail of a product they want to buy, making each manufactured product a unique piece rather than just another part in a large-scale production. The availability of such complex built-to-order systems is introducing a more complex manufacturing process, requiring more cognitive effort compared to the traditional built-to-stock approach. The manual-assembly workplace is thus becoming a challenging environment. To help the workers better manage such environments, the authors have built an assistive system that can be integrated directly into the workplace using in-situ projection for augmented reality. This article is part of a special issue on digitally enhanced reality.
Markus Funk
added 2 research items
Today's working society tries to integrate more and more impaired workers into everyday working processes. One major scenario for integrating impaired workers is in the assembly of products. However, the tasks that are being assigned to cognitively impaired workers are easy tasks that consist of only a small number of assembly steps. For tasks with a higher number of steps, cognitively impaired workers need instructions to help them with assembly. Although supervisors provide general support and assist new workers while learning new assembly steps, sheltered work organizations often provide additional printed pictorial instructions that actively guide the workers. To further improve continuous instructions, we built a system that uses in-situ projection and a depth camera to provide context-sensitive instructions. To explore the effects of in-situ instructions, we compared them to state-of-the-art pictorial instructions in a user study with 15 cognitively impaired workers at a sheltered work organization. The results show that using in-situ instructions, cognitively impaired workers can assemble more complex products up to 3 times faster and with up to 50% less errors. Further, the workers liked the in-situ instructions provided by our assistive system and would use it for everyday assembly.
With the demographic change and a generally increasing product complexity, there is a growing demand for assistance technology to cognitively support workers during industrial production processes. Many approaches including head-mounted displays, smart gloves, or in-situ projections have been suggested to provide cognitive support for the workers. Recently, research focused on improving the cognitive feedback by using activity recognition to make it context-aware. Thereby an assistance technology is able to detect work steps and provide additional feedback in case the worker makes mistakes. However, when designing feedback for a rather monotonous task, such as product assembly, it should be designed in a way it does neither over-challenge nor under-challenge the worker. In this paper, we sketch out requirements for providing cognitive assistance at the workplace that can adapt to the worker's needs in real-time. Further, we discuss challenges and provide design suggestions.
Ralf Klamma
added an update
Call for Participation
Workshop HCI Perspectives on Industry 4.0 @ I-KNOW 2017, Graz, Austria
 
Mario Aehnelt
added a research item
The continuous digitalization will have a lasting effect on the working world. It results in changing work conditions and cognitive requirements with respect to the human worker. Here, the manual assembly workplace is an outstanding example for the growing complexity and variety of digital work processes in manufacturing industries. This thesis presents a novel approach to support cognitive work processes and to automate corresponding information flows at the manual assembly workplace. It combines both disciplines, computer science and psychology, in order to systematically derive and develop the technological components and procedures of cognitive information assistance, based on the psychological models for human understanding and acting. The proposed approach of cognitive information assistance aims at supporting the human thinking, learning, memorizing and remembering as sub-processes of conscious decision making. It addresses the situational dependency on changing assembly requirements and follows a methodological framework which combines the psychological models of team cognition and cognitive apprenticeship. Both are used for the technological engineering of collaboration between the human worker and the cognitive information assistance system. In this thesis cognitive requirements at the manual assembly workplace as well as technological conditions are used to develop a generalized architecture for cognitive information assistance and to detail the corresponding components and procedures. This architecture was realized with the Plant@Hand assembly assistance system based on the cognitive architecture Soar. The assistance system automatically guides workers through the execution of assembly tasks and generates work instructions based on the current work situation and on provided data from manufacturing information systems. The conceptual approach of cognitive information assistance was evaluated in comparison to traditional assembly manuals in order to analyze the effects on the quality and effciency of the manual assembly. The evaluation showed a significant reduction decrease of assembly errors and a significant effciency increase with the usage of cognitive information assistance. The scientific and technical contribution of this thesis are the transdisciplinary concepts, methods and procedures for supporting cognitive work processes and to automate corresponding information flows.
Markus Funk
added 2 research items
With projectors and depth cameras getting cheaper, assistive systems in industrial manufacturing are becoming increasingly ubiquitous. As these systems are able to continuously provide feedback using in-situ projection, they are perfectly suited for supporting impaired workers in assembling products. However, so far little research has been conducted to understand the effects of projected instructions on impaired workers. In this paper, we identify common visualizations used by assistive systems for impaired workers and introduce a simple contour visualization. Through a user study with 64 impaired participants we compare the different visualizations to a control group using no visual feedback in a real world assembly scenario, i.e. assembling a clamp. Furthermore, we introduce a simplified version of the NASA-TLX questionnaire designed for impaired participants. The results reveal that the contour visualization is significantly better in perceived mental load and perceived performance of the participants. Further, participants made fewer errors and were able to assemble the clamp faster using the contour visualization compared to a video visualization, a pictorial visualization and a control group using no visual feedback.
Durch den Einzug von computergestützten Systemen in industrielle Produktionsprozesse (Industrie 4.0) werden mehr und mehr Anwendungen möglich, die Arbeitern während komplexen Aufgaben helfen können. Dieser Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit der manuellen Kommissionierung und stellt einen Überblick über computergestützte Assistenzsysteme für diese Tätigkeit vor. Hier-bei liegt der Fokus auf der Mensch-Computer Schnittstelle, welche im Zuge der Industrie 4.0 eine zunehmend größere Bedeutung er-fährt. Zuerst wird ein Überblick über die Mensch-Computer Schnittstellen gegeben, die in Industrie und Forschung vorge-schlagen wurden. Danach werden projektionsbasierte Kommissi-onierassistenzsysteme vorgestellt, die im Rahmen des Forschungs-projektes motionEAP entworfen wurden.
Mario Aehnelt
added a research item
Research on how to take advantage of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality applications and technologies in the domain of manufacturing has brought forward a great number of concepts, prototypes, and working systems. Although comprehensive surveys have taken account of the state of the art, the design space of industrial augmented and virtual reality keeps diversifying. We propose a visual approach towards assessing this space and present an interactive, community-driven tool which supports interested researchers and practitioners in gaining an overview of the aforementioned design space. Using such a framework we collected and classified relevant publications in terms of application areas and technology platforms. This tool shall facilitate initial research activities as well as the identification of research opportunities. Thus, we lay the groundwork, forthcoming workshops and discussions shall address the re-finement.
Markus Funk
added 2 research items
Order Picking is not only one of the most important but also most mentally demanding and error-prone tasks in the industry. Both stationary and wearable systems have been introduced to facilitate this task. Existing stationary systems are not scalable because of the high cost and wearable systems have issues being accepted by the workers. In this paper, we introduce a mobile camera-projector cart called OrderPickAR, which combines the benefits of both stationary and mobile systems to support order picking through Augmented Reality. Our system dynamically projects in-situ picking information into the storage system and automatically detects when a picking task is done. In a lab study, we compare our system to existing approaches, i.e, Pick-by-Paper, Pick-by-Voice, and Pick-by-Vision. The results show that using the proposed system, order picking is almost twice as fast as other approaches, the error rate is decreased up to 9 times, and mental demands are reduced up to 50%.
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
The next workshop which adresses Human Computer Interaction in the context of Industry 4.0 will take place at the 10th International Conference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments (PETRA 2017) from June 21-23 on the Island of Rhodes in Greece.
More details can be found here: http://www.petrae.org/workshops/DAEM.html
 
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
This years' "International Workshop on Sensor-based Activity Recognition and Interaction" will be held in Rostock, Germany from the 21st to the 22nd of September. It has a strong relationship to the general HCI community and focuses on manufacturing and healthcare application scenarios. Feel free to contribute!
Here's the CfP.
======================================================================
iWOAR 2017 -- Call for Papers
4th International Workshop on
Sensor-based Activity Recognition and Interaction
21-22 September 2017, Rostock - Germany
in-cooperation with ACM, SIGAI and SIGCHI
======================================================================
Ubiquitous systems are becoming an integral part of our everyday
lives. Functionality and user experience often depends on accurate,
sensor-based activity recognition and interaction. Systems aiming to
provide the user with assistance or to monitor their behavior and
condition rely heavily on sensors and the activities and interactions
that they can recognize. Providing adequate activity recognition and
interaction requires consideration for particular elements: sensors
that are capable of capturing relevant behavior, methods that reason
about sensor readings in the context of these behaviors, and
appropriate methods for assisting and interacting with the user. All
of these aspects are essential and can influence the quality and
suitability of the provided service.
Objective of iWOAR 2017 -- the 4th International Workshop on
Sensor-based Activity Recognition and Interaction -- is to discuss
these challenges and possible solution approaches. The workshop
focuses on:
1. sensors, sensor infrastructures, and sensing technologies needed to
detect user behaviors and to provide relevant interactions between
systems and users
2. data and model-driven methods for intelligent monitoring and user
assistance that supports users in everyday settings
3. novel applications and evaluation studies of methods for
intelligent monitoring of everyday user behavior and user
assistance using sensing technologies
4. intelligent methods for synthesizing assistance and interaction
strategies using sensing technologies
iWOAR 2017 aims to foster the relationship between academia and
industry. We strongly encourage industry participants to present
challenges, ideas, experiences, novel applications, and studies of
existing methods. Accepted industrial papers will be presented in an
industrial session during the workshop.
------
Topics
------
The topics of the workshop include, but are not limited to:
- Human activity recognition
- Healthcare systems
- Cognitive systems
- Knowledge representation and reasoning
- Expert Systems
- NLP for intelligent systems
- Ontologies for intelligent systems
- Knowledge acquisition for intelligent systems
- Assistive systems in the healthcare and manufacturing
- Novel applications for assessing everyday behavior
- Smart homes
- Behavior monitoring and interpretation
- Human performance measuring
- Interaction techniques
- Intelligent user interfaces
- Input & output modalities
- Wearable computing and wearable sensing
- Context awareness
- Data mining and machine learning for sensor-based intelligent systems
- Signal reconstruction and interpolation
- Innovative wearable sensing technologies
---------------------
Submission and Review
---------------------
All submissions undergo a peer review process to ensure the
presentation of high quality content. Accepted submissions will be
published in the iWOAR 2017 Proceedings. The ACM SIGCHI paper format
should be used with a maximum total length of 6 pages (including
references and appendices), although paper length can be flexible for
outstanding contributions up to an absolute limit of 12 pages. Papers
are to be submitted through the EasyChair submission system.
---------------
Important dates
---------------
Submission deadline: 15 June 2017
Notification: 30 July 2017
Camera ready version: TBA
Author registration: TBA
Workshop: 21 – 22 September 2017
-----------------
Conference chairs
-----------------
- Thomas Kirste, University of Rostock, GER
- Bodo Urban, Fraunhofer IGD, GER
--------------------
Organizing committee
--------------------
- Kristina Yordanova, University of Rostock, GER
- Max Schröder, University of Rostock, GER
------------------------
Program committee chairs
------------------------
- Sebastian Bader, University of Rostock, GER
- Adeline Paiement, Swansea University, GBR
- Anke Lehmann, TU Dresden, GER
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Program committee
-----------------
- Ahmed Rabee Sadik, Fraunhofer IGD, GER
- Albert Hein, University of Rostock, GER
- Alessandra Mileo , National University of Ireland, Galway, IRL
- Alfred Hesener , Infineon, USA
- Andreas Bulling, Max Planck Institute for Informatics, GER
- Arjan Kuijper, Fraunhofer IGD, GER
- Bodo Urban, Fraunhofer IGD, GER
- Charalampos Doukas, CREATE-NET, ITA
- Christina Strohrmann , BOSCH-Sensortec, GER
- Denys J.C. Matthies, University of Rostock, GER
- Dieter W. Fellner , Fraunhofer IGD, GER
- Didier Stricker, Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, GER
- Fillia Makedon, University of Texas Arlington, USA
- Gerald Bieber, Fraunhofer IGD, GER
- Gilles Bailly, Telecom ParisTech, FRA
- Hans-Joerg Schulz, University of Rostock, GER
- Ilias Maglogiannis, University of Piraeus, GRC
- Jochen Huber, Synaptics, USA
- Keying Zhu, City University of Hong Kong, CHN
- Kristina Yordanova, University of Rostock, GER
- Kristof van Laerhoven, University of Freiburg, GER
- Marcel Jacomet, University of Bern, CHE
- Mario Aehnelt, Fraunhofer IGD, GER
- Marian Haescher, University of Rostock, GER
- Max Schröder, University of Rostock, GER
- Nicolai Marquardt, University College London, GBR
- Oliver Amft, University of Passau, GER
- Paul Lukowicz, Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, GER
- Rebekka Alm, University of Rostock, GER
- Simon T. Perrault, YALE-NUS College, SGP
- Soledad Ballesteros, National Distance Education University, ESP
- Stefan Göbel, University of Darmstadt, GER
- Stefan Lüdtke, University of Rostock, GER
- Thijs Roumen, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, GER
- Thomas Kirste, University of Rostock, GER
- Tobias Grosse-Puppendahl, Microsoft Research Cambridge, GBR
- Uwe Kaulbars, Institute of Occupational Safty & Health, GER
- Vangelis Metsis, Texas State University, USA
For further information regarding the workshop and paper submission,
please visit our webpage (www.iwoar.org) or contact Kristina Yordanova
at kristina.yordanova@uni-rostock.de or Max Schröder at
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Markus Funk
added 2 research items
We are observing a trend that more and more manual assembly workplaces are equipped with sensor technology to assist workers during complex work tasks. These assistive systems mostly use visual feedback for providing assembly instructions or hinting at errors. However, a red light indicating an error might not always be the best solution for communicating that an error was made, or might be overlooked in stressful situations. Therefore, we extended an assitsive system to compare haptic, auditory, and visual error feedback at the manual assembly workplace. Through two user studies, we first determine suitable variants for each error feedback modality and second compare the error feedback modalities against each other. The results show that haptic feedback is appropriate for retaining the worker's privacy, and auditory feedback is perceived as most distracting. The subjective feedback reveals interesting insights for future research in communicating errors as a combination of haptic and visual feedback might lead to noticing an error faster.
Order picking is one of the most complex and error-prone tasks that can be found in the industry. To support the workers, many order picking instruction systems have been proposed. A large number of systems focus on equipping the user with head-mounted displays or equipping the environment with projectors to support the workers. However combining the user-worn design dimension with in-situ projection has not been investigated in the area of order picking yet. With this paper, we aim to close this gap by introducing HelmetPickAR: a body-worn helmet using in-situ projection for supporting order picking. Through a user study with 16 participants we compare HelmetPickAR against a state-of-the-art Pick-by-Paper approach. The results reveal that HelmetPickAR leads to significantly less cognitive effort for the worker during order picking tasks. While no difference was found in errors and picking time, the placing time increases.
Ralf Klamma
added an update
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
The call for workshops and papers of the PETRA 2017 conference is online: http://www.petrae.org
 
Markus Funk
added 15 project references
Mario Aehnelt
added a research item
This paper introduces the Social Augmented Learning (SAL) application, with which Augmented Reality (AR) can be applied in vocational training and on-the-job training situations. In this way, complex interdependencies of modern industrial machines can be visualized immediately, which facilitates the transmission and training of knowledge-intensive work tasks and leads to an increased training quality. We show the current state of research of AR-use in vocational training and, based on the identified research gaps, formulate the requirements on which the SAL application is based. We will then describe the development, implementation and evaluation of this application, with a focus on the application design. In the context of SAL, we will then answer previously formulated research questions and show further potential for research in the field of vocational training with AR.
Mario Aehnelt
added an update
October 19th
We had a great and inspiring workshop on HCI in Industry 4.0 with first discussions and cooperations between the researchers in our group.
 
Mario Aehnelt
added 12 project references
Mario Aehnelt
added a project goal
Today we are facing a new era of industrial automation and interconnection which drives the transition of human workplaces. New technologies but also novel business processes lead to a shift of worker related requirements at the data-intensive manufacturing workplace on the shop floor or in knowledge-intensive maintenance field operations. HCI research is already dealing with these new challenges by developing and providing practical assistance solutions which bring together again the power of industrial automation with the flexibility of human intelligence.
With HCI@I4.0 we want to develop best practice examples and derive lessons learned from researching and rolling out novel methods and technologies for worker focused assistance under industrial conditions. The aim is to bring together scientific excellence from multiple fields and industrial demands in a vivid dialog. Therefore, HCI@I4.0 encourages scientists in the field of manufacturing, production management, computer science and psychology to participate with their scientific contribution and to provide interesting stimuli as well as research insights. Vice versa it focuses on the industrial audience which searches for answers and partnerships in todays’ discussion of emerging Industry 4.0 terms and claims.