Project

Global Microplastics Initiative

Goal: I am the PI on a global microplastics initiative with Adventure Scientists. I work with adventurers around the world who collect water samples and send them to my laboratory for analysis. My laboratory focuses on water sample processing and microplastic quantification in marine and fresh surface waters. We hope that the data collected from this project will help to better understand plastic sources, type and distribution in the aquatic environment.

Methods: Microscope, Filtration, Smart Phone, FT-IR, vacuum pump

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Project log

Abigail Barrows
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Our groundbreaking initiative involved thousands of volunteers throughout four years of expeditions. Together we touched seven continents and collected 3,400 water samples. We found microplastics in every region we ventured into, and discovered a global average among marine samples of nearly 12 microplastic pieces per liter of water––far more than models or theories had predicted.
 
Dear Mrs Barrows
I glad to hear your project about Microplastics Final Report-Adventure Scientists, let me itroduce myself, my name is Muhammad Arief WIbowo, i am junior lecturer in Riau University in Sumatra Island, Indonesia. I have personal interest about marine plastic debris polution, can i join with your as volunteers to colect data in my region and make article with your?
Thank you for your attention, oh yes this is my email, ariefwibowo.m@lecturer.unri.ac.id
Regards
Arief
 
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Abigail Barrows
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Global marine microplastic sampling sites.
 
Abigail Barrows
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Published:
Marine environment microfiber contamination: Global patterns and
the diversity of microparticle origins
 
Abigail Barrows
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Abigail Barrows
added a research item
Aquatic environments are sinks for anthropogenic contamination, whether chemical or solid pollutants. Microfibers shed from clothing and other textiles contribute to this problem. These can be plastic or non-plastic origin. Our aim was to investigate the presence and distribution of both types of anthropogenic microfibers along the length of the Hudson River, USA. Surface grab samples were collected and filtered through a 0.45 μm filter paper. Abundance of fibers was determined after subtraction of potential contamination. 233 microfibers were recorded in 142 samples, averaging 0.98 microfibers L− 1. Subsequent micro-FTIR showed half of the fibers were plastic while the other half were non-plastic, but of anthropogenic origin. There was no relationship between fiber abundance, wastewater treatment plant location or population density. Extrapolating from this data, and using available hydrographic data, 34.4% of the Hudson River's watershed drainage area contributes an average 300 million anthropogenic microfibers into the Atlantic Ocean per day.
Abigail Barrows
added a research item
Understanding distribution and abundance of microplastics in the world's oceans will continue to help inform global law-making. Through recruiting and training over 500 volunteers our study has collected over 1500 samples from remote and populated areas worldwide. Samples include water collected in freshwater, at the sea surface, and throughout the water column. Surface to depth sampling has provided insight into vertical plastic distribution. The development of unique field and laboratory methodology has enabled plastics to be quantified down to 50 µm. In 2015, the study expanded to include global freshwater systems. By understanding plastic patterns, distribution , and concentration in large and small watersheds we will better understand how freshwater systems are contributing to marine micro-plastic pollution.
Abigail Barrows
added a research item
With the rapid evolution of microplastic research over several decades, there is an urgent need to compare methodologies for quantifying microplastic in aquatic environments. The most common method for sea surface sampling is a neuston net tow. This method captures microplastic from large water volumes, and although is widely employed, it is specifically designed for studying plankton ecology. Its effectiveness for microplastic research is limited by the net's mesh size as well as the likelihood of contamination. In our study, we compared a 1 L surface grab sampling method to a 335 μm neuston net tow. Grab sampling collected over three orders of magnitude more microplastic per volume of water as well as a smaller size range and greater proportion of non-fibrous plastic than sampling with a neuston net. Consequently, solely relying on neuston net samples appears to result in an underestimation of the extent of microplastic pollution. For studies aiming to capture and sort larger microplastics without a microscope, the neuston tow method is preferred, since it samples a greater volume of water, increasing the potential of capturing microplastic pieces. Grab sampling can capture plastic at the micro- and nano-scale and in environments where neuston nets are impractical, but the small volume of water sampled may result in high variability among samples. The comparison of these techniques comes at a critical time when sampling methods need standardization for the accurate measurement of the distribution and composition of microplastic in aquatic environments worldwide.
Abigail Barrows
added an update
The Global Microplastics Initiative map has more sample contributions weekly! Check it out at: http://www.adventurescience.org/microplastics.html
 
Abigail Barrows
added a project goal
I am the PI on a global microplastics initiative with Adventure Scientists. I work with adventurers around the world who collect water samples and send them to my laboratory for analysis. My laboratory focuses on water sample processing and microplastic quantification in marine and fresh surface waters. We hope that the data collected from this project will help to better understand plastic sources, type and distribution in the aquatic environment.