Project

Global Englishes in ELT in Germany

Goal: The goal of this network is to bring together researchers and practitioners in Germany that are interested in exploring the role of Global Englishes in English Language Teaching in Germany.

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Marcus Callies
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0,5 WiMi-Stelle (m/w/d) an der Professur für Englische Sprachwissenschaft (Prof. Dr. Markus Bieswanger)
Bewerbungsfrist: 31. Januar 2022
Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaftliche Fakultät der Universität Bayreuth
Dissertations welcome on the topic of varieties of English / GELT!
 
Marcus Callies
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For those of you who are considering to buy the book here comes a flyer that gives you a 20% discount. Enter the code FLY21 at checkout.
 
Marcus Callies
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Marcus Callies
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Marcus Callies
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Philipp Meer
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English Language Education (ELE) in Germany, with its traditional focus on standard British and American English and native-speaker norms more broadly, appears to be relatively unaffected by recent developments toward Teaching English as an International Language (TEIL). The present chapter introduces the volume and its individual contributions, all of which aim to address this gap. Eleven chapters, structured across three larger sections-(I) TEIL in language teacher education, (II) TEIL in the curricula, and (III) Innovative materials and activities for the TEIL classroom-identify the various barriers to innovation in favor of TEIL in Germany and suggest possible ways to overcome these. Terminological conventions used throughout the volume are also introduced.
Marcus Callies
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Marcus Callies
added 2 research items
The worldwide spread, diversification, and globalization of the English language in the course of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries has significant implications for English Language Teaching and teacher education. We are currently witnessing a paradigm shift towards Teaching English as an International Language (TEIL) that aims to promote multilingualism and awareness of the diversity of Englishes, increase exposure to this diversity, embrace multiculturalism, and foster cross-cultural awareness. Numerous initiatives that embrace TEIL can be observed around the world, but ELT and teacher education in Germany (and other European countries) appear to be largely unaffected by this development, with standard British and American English and the monolingual native speaker (including the corresponding cultural norms) still being very much at the center of attention. The present volume addresses this gap and is the first of its kind to showcase recent initiatives that aim at introducing TEIL into ELT and teacher education in Germany, but which have applicability and impact for other countries with comparable education systems and ‘traditional’ ELT practices in the Expanding Circle. The chapters in this book provide a balanced mix of conceptual, empirical, and practical studies and offer the perspectives of the many stakeholders involved in various settings of English language education whose voices have not often been heard, i.e., students, university lecturers, trainee teachers, teacher educators, and in-service teachers. It therefore adds significantly to the limited amount of previous work on TEIL in Germany and bridges the gap between theory and practice that will not only be relevant for researchers, educators, and practitioners in English language education in Germany but other educational settings that are still unaffected by the shift towards TEIL.
Marcus Callies
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Das von Kachru (1992) vorgeschlagene Modell der drei konzentrischen Kreise, das unter den englischsprachigen Ländern kategorisch unterscheidet zwischen solchen, in denen Englisch als Muttersprache, als Zweitsprache oder als Fremdsprache erworben bzw. erlernt wird, hat die Modellbildung zur weltweiten Ausbreitung des Englischen nachhaltig beeinflusst. Die große Beachtung des Modells hat auch dazu geführt, dass sich unterschiedliche Forschungsparadigmen herausgebildet haben, in denen bestimmte sprachliche Phänomene, für deren Verwendung in den drei Varietätentypen große Ähnlichkeiten zu beobachten sind, dennoch unterschiedlich beschrieben und klassifiziert werden. Der vorliegende Beitrag zeigt am Beispiel der relativ gut erforschten Konstruktionen mit Partikelverben, wie sich diese Unterschiede als Widersprüche manifestieren, und hinterfragt, inwieweit sich idealisierte, oft monolinguale mutterprachliche Standards ob der zunehmenden Diversifizierung und Ausbildung plurizentrischer Normen in der Verwendung des Englischen weltweit aufrecht erhalten lassen. Diese und ähnliche Fragestellungen werden nun auch verstärkt mit Blick auf den schulischen Englischunterricht und die Ausbildung von Englischlehrkräften aufgegriffen, zum Beispiel im Kontext des didaktischen Ansatzes „English as an International Language“ (Matsuda 2017). Wir greifen in diesem Beitrag diesen Ansatz auf und stellen unser an der Universität Bremen entwickeltes, innovatives Veranstaltungskonzept an der Schnittstelle von englischer Sprachwissenschaft, Fremdsprachendidaktik und Unterrichtspraxis vor.
Philipp Meer
added a research item
In line with international developments in applied linguistics, school curricula in Germany have begun to demand that Global Englishes be included in English Language Teaching. However, the perspectives of German school students, the main addressees of such a shift, are little explored. This article investigates the attitudes to and familiarity with different Englishes among 160 German high school students, using a mix of direct and indirect attitude elicitation methods and a nationality identification task. Informants rated (speakers of) Standard Southern British (StSBrE), Standard American (StAmE), Indian (IndE), German (GerE), and African/Kenyan English (AfrE/KenE). Multivariate analyses revealed that informants are most familiar with StSBrE and StAmE. StSBrE and, to a smaller degree, StAmE are perceived as reference norms, while English as a Second Language (ESL) varieties, especially IndE are rated negatively for competence, professionalism, and intelligibility. Familiarity with specific English as a First/Native Language varieties is linked to more positive attitudes. The observed congruence of directly and indirectly elicited attitudes suggests that changes put forth in language curricula have not influenced language attitudes (yet).
Marcus Callies
added an update
Our edited volume "Glocalising Teaching English as an International Language. New perspectives for teaching and teacher education in Germany" to be published in Routledge's RATEILS book series is now in production! The publisher has already put up a webpage for the book:
Looking forward to seeing it published!
 
Michael Westphal
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English today is a conglomerate of a vast array of different varieties of English. This linguistic diversity, captured most prominently in the World Englishes paradigm (Kachru, 1985), poses a challenge to English language teaching (ELT) in countries where English does not have an official status (i.e. there is no codified local norm) and is learned as a foreign language, such as Armenia or Germany. Learners of English in these countries are norm-dependent on ‘standard’ Englishes spoken as a native language (Kachru, 1985) as the models of teaching (Galloway & Rose, 2015: 196–198; Matsuda and Friedrich, 2012: 21–22). These ‘Standard Englishes’ are abstract and idealized concepts as they are never fully realized by speakers in their ‘clearly delimited, perfectly uniform, and perfectly stable’ (Milroy, 2001: 543) form. However, they are powerful ideas in the minds of speakers – and learners in particular – as the models of language teaching. Standard British (StBE) and Standard American English (StAmE) and their associated prestige accents Received Pronunciation and General American traditionally serve as the models of language teaching for learners (Kirkpatrick, 2007: 184–189; Phillipson, 1992: 136–172). StBE has long been considered the global prestige accent variety but Bayard et al. (2001: 41–43) hypothesize that it is gradually replaced by StAmE due to the global availability of the US media.
Philipp Meer
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While recent research on English language teaching (ELT) in Germany has called for a more comprehensive representation of the diversity of English worldwide, learners’ perceptions of Global Englishes are currently underresearched despite their importance for a successful implementation of this change in ELT. The present paper analyzes 166 German secondary school students’ perceptions of Global Englishes, underlying cultural associations, and stereotypes. To this end, a perceptual dialect identification task, keyword association, and direct open questions were combined in a folklinguistic study. The results show that the informants consider British and American English as general standards and primarily associate English-speaking countries with Inner Circle varieties: British, American, and Australian English. British English is regarded as the default school reference norm, while American English is associated with dynamism and casualness. Furthermore, the students identify Indian and African English(es) as important Global Englishes. Their perceptions of these varieties are, however, less positive and seem to be influenced by cultural stereotypes, which might prompt them to perceive these varieties as funny or unintelligent. We suggest that learners’ existing knowledge of Global Englishes and explicit metalinguistic discussions of variation can be used as starting points to counteract such stereotypes.
Marcus Callies
added 4 research items
The aim of this article is to link English as a lingua franca (ELF) to inclusive teaching practices in English language teaching (ELT). It will be argued that the use of English as a lingua franca can provide another dimension to the language. This is particularly useful in the light of differentiation and individualization in open settings. Firstly, the term inclusion will be briefly outlined in the context of this article. In a next step, ELF will be conceptualized in a competence-based approach and then linked to inclusive teaching in ELT. This will be done by viewing ELF as • a set of features • a mindset • a communicative mode and set of strategies Each point will be elaborated on and discussed in connection with inclusion in ELT. As an outlook, some insights into first practical ideas for the classroom will be presented, particularly concerning the Lernaufgaben-Planungs-(LAP-) Modell (Eßer, Gerlach, & Roters, 2018) and competence-based tasks (Hallet, 2012).
Today’s learners of English will face the challenge of having to communicate with speakers of English from a variety of backgrounds in their future. The smallest fraction of their prospective interlocutors will be native speakers of well-known standard varieties such as British and American English. Researchers of different research paradigms have discussed the pedagogical implications of this diverse sociolinguistic reality, which we refer to by the term Global Englishes. The two strategies that are proposed frequently are a) to allow learners of English to encounter a variety of different Englishesin order to develop (listening) comprehension skills and b) to address pragmatic and interaction strategies that allow to deal with intercultural encounters and – in particular –communication barriers. Starting from this theoretical background, we first investigate one coursebook each for the intermediate and the advanced secondary school level in the German state North Rhine-Westphalia to find out to what extent current coursebooks provide Global Englishes material. We identify a trend to providing a considerable amount of material. However, even most recent ebooks rely on audio files despite the fact that they could include a higher amount of audio-visual material. We argue that in particular audio-visual material is well-suited for making students encounter Global Englishes in the classroom and move on to suggest TED-talks, advertisements and cinematic films as highly suitable sources of material. We illustrate our argument with examples and selected tasks for each category. We end the article by proposing specific activities that can be used to practice interaction strategies.
Marcus Callies
added an update
I am happy to announce that Stefanie Hehner and myself serve as region coordinators for Germany in the recently launched international network "Teaching English and Teaching IN English in global contexts" directed by Nicola Galloway at the University of Edinburgh.
These regional pages shall serve as a hub for collecting and providing information about teaching English and English as a medium of instruction in higher education in Germany, e.g. posts about relevant research and publications, events (talks, workshops, conferences), and practical resources. Our aim is to engage with researchers and practitioners and facilitate access to the resources made available by the network members. We aim to periodically update our content and are grateful to anybody who can point us to relevant information we may have missed or overlooked!
Best wishes
Marcus Callies
 
Marcus Callies
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We are happy that our joint book proposal for an edited volume entiteld "Glocalising Teaching English as an International Language: New perspectives for teaching and teacher education in Germany" has been accepted for publication in the abovementiond book series.
 
Marcus Callies
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We are very pleased to welcome Nicola Galloway from the University of Edinburgh, UK, to the University of Bremen. Nicola will talk about the pedagogical implications of the global spread of English for TESOL. The talk will take place on Monday, December 9th, 2019, from 2:15 to 3:45 pm in the SFG, room 2070.
All welcome!
In today’s globalised world, the needs of English language learners have changed, particularly those learning to use the English language as a lingua franca. The growing research showcasing the global use of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), the creativity of ELF users and the diverse ways in which they negotiate successful communication in multilingual encounters have numerous implications for the field of TESOL. In this talk, I will explore the pedagogical implications of the global spread of English, outlining calls for change to TESOL curricula. These include calls to consider new goals, assessments, materials and pedagogical perspectives that best match students’ needs to use English as a global language. I will synthesize a body of classroom-based research that experiment with incorporating Global Englishes into language classrooms and teacher training programs. These studies on Global Englishes curriculum innovation respond to calls for a major shift in perspective in TESOL—the likes of which last occurred in the 1970s with the movement towards communicative language teaching. Since this time, the world has witnessed further globalization and the entrenchment of English as the global language. However, curriculum innovation is a complex process and a number of barriers to change are present. I will explore the challenges of putting theory into teaching practice and provide an overview of a recently established network to break down barriers to change to encourage researchers and practitioners to collaborate and share resources (http://www.globalenglishes.education.ed.ac.uk).
 
Marcus Callies
added an update
Stefanie Hehner / Philipp Meer / Michael Westphal and myself submitted a book proposal entitled "English as an International Language in Teacher Education and English Language Teaching. Current perspectives from linguistics, language pedagogy and teaching practice in Germany" to Routledge for consideration in their "Advances in Teaching English as an International Language" series:
Thanks to all who submitted their abstracts for the proposal!
 
Marcus Callies
added a research item
Die weltweite Verbreitung, Globalisierung, und die hierdurch entstandene Varietätenvielfalt des Englischen sowie seine Stellung als globale Lingua Franca bringen bedeutsame Implikationen für den Englischunterricht ("English Language Teaching", ELT) und die Lehrkräfteausbildung mit sich. Während in Deutschland nach wie vor entweder das britische oder amerikanische Standardenglisch als Referenzvarietät dient, vollzieht sich derzeit auf internationaler Ebene ein Paradigmenwechsel hin zu "Global Englishes Language Teaching" (GELT). Trotz zahlreicher Empfehlungen, diesen Ansatz auch im deutschsprachigen Raum verstärkt umzusetzen, fehlt es an kontextspezifischen und praktischen Vorschlägen. Der vorliegende Aufsatz beschreibt einen interaktiven Workshop, der sich dieser Herausforderungen annahm. Wir gaben den Teilnehmenden zunächst einen Überblick über GELT und diskutierten seine Rolle für ELT auf universitärer Ebene, insbesondere im Bereich der Lehrkräfteausbildung. Drei Aspekte standen dabei im Mittelpunkt: (1) Sprachlernbiographien als Möglichkeit, das Bewusstsein angehender Lehrkräften in Bezug auf deren eigene Erfahrungen mit der globalen Diversität des Englischen zu wecken und die Notwendigkeit aufzuzeigen, mit verschiedensten Sprechenden kommunizieren zu können; (2) die Untersuchung und Einbindung nicht-standardsprachlicher Varietäten am Beispiel des Jamaikanischen Kreols, und (3) eine kritische Untersuchung vorhandener GELT Unterrichtsmaterialien und deren Eignung für GELT auf der universitären Ebene.
Philipp Meer
added a research item
This paper discusses the relevance of learning through research for the teaching of English linguistics at German universities by drawing on theoretical considerations and an exemplary research-based teaching project at the intersection of (applied) linguistics and TEFL. The paper argues that teaching and research can both profit from research-based teaching and learning practices, and that interdisciplinary and project-oriented approaches to research-based teaching may be particularly helpful to bridge the gap between teaching and research in the given context.
Philipp Meer
added an update
Our 2nd network meeting on Global Englishes in ELT in Germany will take place in Münster on May 24, 2019. Please find more information in the attached PDF.
 
Marcus Callies
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Several project members will be offering a workshop on "Global Englishes and challenges for English Language Teaching and Teacher Education in Higher Education in Germany" during the biennial symposium on language learning and teaching at universities organised by the Fremdsprachenzentrum der Hochschulen im Land Bremen (FZHB) [https://www.fremdsprachenzentrum-bremen.de/2126.0.html?&L=1]
The workshop will take place on Saturday, March 2, 2019, from 9:30 to 11.
Description:
The worldwide expansion, globalisation, and diversification of English and its establishment as the global lingua franca have significant implications for English Language Teaching (ELT) and English Language Teacher Education (ELTE). While, in Germany, ELT and ELTE have traditionally focused on (Standard) British and American English, both are facing an emerging paradigm shift towards Global Englishes (GE)-informed approaches at the international level. However, despite recommendations on how to implement such an approach, context-specific and practical perspectives are still rare.
This interactive workshop sets out to tackle these challenges. We will give participants an overview of GE and discuss implications for ELT at university level, particularly with regard to ELTE. We will focus on three related aspects, alternating between short presentations, discussions, and short tasks: first, we present language learning biographies as a tool to raise awareness among future teachers of their own experiences with the diverse nature of English and thus the need to be able to interact with a diverse set of interlocutors. Second, we address a variety of English that is structurally distinct from standard norms, and discuss the question of how and to what extent to include specific varieties in ELT. Third, we critically examine existing GE-informed learning materials and their usefulness for ELTE. We end with final recommendations for ELTE in Germany.
 
Mona Syrbe
added a research item
en English has developed into a global language, spoken in numerous varieties and used as a lingua franca worldwide. Consequently, scholars have argued for a shift in English language teaching to an EIL‐oriented approach. This paper examines the suitability of this approach for German secondary schools and shows its relevance for English language teaching in Germany. It further investigates to what extent such an approach can be implemented in Germany based on the curriculum of Germany's most populous state. While the approach ties in well with some components of the curriculum, many elements of teaching English will have to be reconsidered, so that the English classrooms in Germany can move away from the native speaker model towards teaching EIL. Abstract de English hat sich zu einer globalen Sprache entwickelt, von der zahlreiche Varietäten existieren, und die als Lingua Franca weltweit genutzt wird. Folglich plädieren Wissenschaftler für einen Wechsel in der englischen Fremdsprachendidaktik zu einem Ansatz, der English als internationale Sprache versteht. Dieser Artikel erörtert, in wiefern sich dieser Ansatz für deutsche Sekundarschulen eignet, und zeigt dessen Relevanz für den deutschen English Unterrricht. Basierend auf einer Analyse von Nordrhein Westfalens Kernlehrplan für English an der gymnasialen Obersufe, diskutiert dieser Artikel desweiteren, in welchem Umfang solch eine englische Sprachdidaktik in Deutschland implementiert werden könnte. Zwar stimmen einige der Kernkompetenzen des Kernlehrplans mit einer EIL Orientierung überein, eine Umsetzung dieses Ansatzes, so dass Deutschland sich von dem gängigen ‘native speaker model’ lösen könnte, würde jedoch bedeuten, dass erheblich Elemente der englischen Fachdidaktik überdacht werden müssten.
Marcus Callies
added an update
RETHINKING THE LANGUAGE LEARNER
Paradigms - Methods - Disciplines
Thursday February 28 to Saturday March 2, 2019
at the University of Bremen
All areas of our society are currently being affected by radical changes and developments. Globalisation, demographic change, and the ever-increasing digitalisation of the world of work and life in general mean that knowledge and the imparting of knowledge have constantly to be re-adapted to these fast-moving changes. Rapidly increasing internationalisation, enhanced heterogeneity and diversity, in conjunction with course schedules which are being streamlined more and more require language learning and teaching at our universities to adopt a new approach. Language centres are therefore faced with the challenge of realigning their language courses and concepts to changed learners, new learning cultures and new ways of learning. This equally has an impact on the work, training and education of teachers and students alike.
The 7th Bremen Symposium would like to offer a platform to examine this dichotomy from the point of view of language teaching and language learning research and the reference disciplines, to highlight the access afforded by interdisciplinary considerations and thereby place the focus on the learners. This requires foreign language teaching at universities to intermesh with related disciplines such as neurolinguistics and neurodidactics, and it should also take on board concepts from plurilingual didactics, translanguaging and language awareness. The symposium also wishes to highlight how such concepts can be implemented from a practical point of view in curricula and classrooms in general.
Hosting institutions
Fremdsprachenzentrum der Hochschulen im Land Bremen (FZHB) in cooperation with the Association of language centres, language teaching institutes and institutes of foreign languages at German universities (AKS).
 
Philipp Meer
added a project goal
The goal of this network is to bring together researchers and practitioners in Germany that are interested in exploring the role of Global Englishes in English Language Teaching in Germany.