Archived project

Feminist Hypertext Theory

Goal: This old research from graduate school.

Date: 31 December 1999 - 30 December 2003

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Carlton Clark
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This study demonstrates the convergence of three disciplinary fields: hypertext theory, feminist epistemology, and feminist rhetoric. My central thesis is that the conjunction o f hypertext theory and feminist epistemology allows for a rearticulation of feminist rhetoric. The core o f this study consists of an analysis of five female-authored hypertexts, all of which were composed with Eastgate Systems’ Storyspace hypertext-authoring software: two long hyperfictions, Carolyn Guyer’s Quibbling ( 1992) and Shelley Jackson’s Patchwork Girl (1995); two short hyperfictions, J. Yellowlees Douglas’s ‘I Have Said Nothing” (1994) and Mary-Kim Arnold’s “Lust” (1994); and Diane Greco’s hypertext monograph Cyborg: Engineering the Body Electric (1995).
My purpose with this paper is to place hypertext theory in a productive engagement with feminist epistemology and feminist pedagogy. The major hypertext theorists (e.g., George Landow, Jay David Bolter, Michael Joyce) have focused, for the most part, on the relationship between hypertext and print. I wish to depart from this practice by examining the relationship between hypertext and people – specifically, people who read and write literary hypertext. In other words, my aim is not to compare and contrast two different technologies or literacies, but to examine human interactions with hypertext. In a sense, then, this paper is an exploration of the cyborg.
Carlton Clark
added a project goal
This old research from graduate school.