Project

FACTS4WORKERS

Goal: Worker-Centric Workplaces in Smart Factories (FACTS4WORKERS.EU) is a project coordinated by VIRTUAL VEHICLE in the Horizon 2020 program of the European Commission within the Factory of the Future PPP. The vision of FACTS4WORKERS is to leverage the large potential added value of manufacturing data, information and knowledge in a worker-centred way to achieve worker empowerment, resulting in higher worker satisfaction and increased worker productivity.

It is the high ambition of our project to create “FACTorieS for WORKERS” (FACTS4WORKERS), therefore a serious effort will be put into integrating already available IT enablers into a seamless & flexible Smart Factory infrastructure based on worker-centric and data-driven technology building blocks. As FACTS4WORKERS is underpinned by a clear human-centric approach: usability, user experience and technology acceptance are of the utmost project interest.

FACTS4WORKERS will develop and demonstrate workplace solutions that support the inclusion of increasing elements of knowledge work on the factory floor. These solutions will empower workers on the shop floor with smart factory ICT infrastructure. Advancement will be gained through integrating several building blocks from a flexible smart factory infrastructure, focusing on workers’ needs, expectations and requirements, and being supported by organisational measures and change management. In line with our assumptions on impacts on productivity we therefore estimate that that we can increase job satisfaction for 800,000 European workers by the year 2025.

These solutions will be developed according to the following four industrial challenges which are generalise-able to manufacturing in general: personalised augmented operator, worked-centric rich-media knowledge sharing/management, self-learning manufacturing workplaces and in-situ mobile learning in the production.

Moreover, FACT4WORKER‘s objectives in terms of measureable indicators are:

TO INCREASE PROBLEM-SOLVING AND INNOVATION SKILLS OF WORKERS;
TO INCREASE COGNITIVE JOB SATISFACTION OF WORKERS PARTICIPATING IN THE PILOTS;
TO INCREASE AVERAGE WORKER PRODUCTIVITY BY 10% FOR WORKERS PARTICIPATING IN PILOTS;
TO ACHIEVE TRL 5-7 ON A NUMBER OF WORKER-CENTRIC SOLUTIONS THROUGH WHICH WORKERS BECOME THE SMART ELEMENT IN SMART FACTORIES.
The smart factory demonstrator will be run within the automotive supply chain. The consortium is composed by 15 partners from 7 different EU member states including tier-1, -2 and -3 suppliers, large production enterprises and individual factories that are representative of many medium-sized manufacturing operations, manufacturing SMEs, universities and excellent research institutes.

Date: 1 December 2014 - 30 November 2018

Updates
0 new
1
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
38
Reads
0 new
377

Project log

Alexander Richter
added a research item
The successful introduction of new digital tools on the shop floor and the evaluation of their impacts on workers and their work practices are challenging tasks. Choosing and applying the right evaluation approach, methods, and measures to analyze the impact of digital interventions is a challenging task. To support researchers and practitioners in this challenge, the authors present a study out of the context of a large-scale European project, Facts4workers, which developed and implemented worker-centered smart factory solutions that support knowledge work on the shop floor level. Interventions through digitalization have increased workers' job satisfaction, innovation and problem-solving skills, and productivity of organizations. The study demonstrates the context-of-use of socio-technical interventions at four case companies in Germany, Slovenia, and Spain. Combining different kinds of assessments, including quantitative (surveys) as well as qualitative data (interviews, observations)-the authors show how the digital solutions extend the workers' knowledge and competencies and thereby enhance their problem-solving and innovation skills. The evaluation results enable us to deduce valid implications on how to introduce socio-technical interventions and to design ICT solutions that are supposed to address the productivity and more importantly the workers' job satisfaction and innovation skills.
Francisco José Lacueva
added a research item
The introduction of innovative digital tools for supporting manufacturing processes has far-reaching effects at an organizational and individual level due to the development of Industry 4.0. The FACTS4WORKERS project funded by H2020, i.e., Worker-Centric Workplaces in Smart Factories, aims to develop user-centered assistance systems in order to demonstrate their impact and applicability at the shop floor. To achieve this, understanding how to develop such tools is as important as assessing if advantages can be derived from the ICT system created. This study introduces the technology of a workplace solution linked to the industrial challenge of self-learning manufacturing workplaces. Subsequently, a two-step approach to evaluate the presented system is discussed, consisting of the one used in FACTS4WORKERS and the one used in the “Heuristics for Industry 4.0” project. Both approaches and the use case are introduced as a base for presenting the comparison of the results collected in this paper. The comparison of the results for the presented use case is extended with the results for the rest of the FACTS4WORKERS use cases and with future work in the framework.
Francisco José Lacueva
added a research item
The introduction of innovative digital tools for supporting manufacturing processes has far-reaching effects on an organizational and an individual level due to the development of Industry 4.0. The FACTS4WORKERS project funded by H2020, i.e. Worker-Centric Workplaces in Smart Factories, aims to develop user-centered assistance systems in order to demonstrate their impact and applicability at the shop floor. To do so it is important to understand how to develop such tools and how to assess if advantages can be derived from the created ICT system. This study introduces the technology of a workplace solution that is linked to a specific industrial challenge. Subsequently, a 2-stepped approach to evaluate the presented system is discussed. Heuristics, which are an output of project “Heuristics for Industry 4.0”, are used to test if the developed solution covers critical aspects of socio-technical system design. Insights into the design, development and holistic evaluation of digital tools at the shop floor should be shown.
Marlene Schafler
added a research item
It is well-known that the introduction of innovative digital tools in manufacturing due to Industry 4.0 has far-reaching effects on an organizational and on an individual level. The H2020 funded project FACTS4WORKERS - Worker-Centric Workplaces in Smart Factories - aims to develop user-centered assistance systems in order to demonstrate their impact and applicability at the shop floor. To do so it is important to understand how to develop such tools and how to assess if advantages can be derived from the created ICT system. This study introduces the technology of a workplace solution that is linked to a specific industrial challenge. Subsequently, a 2-stepped approach to evaluate the presented system is discussed. Heuristics, which are an output of project “Heuristics for Industry 4.0” are used to test if the developed solution covers critical aspects of socio-technical system design. Insights into the design, development and holistic evaluation of digital tools at the shop floor should be shown.
Lea Hannola
added 2 research items
Successful worker-centered Industry 4.0 solutions depend on the maturity of the technologies supporting workers’ interaction with information systems. This paper discusses the methodology we followed while creating and updating the FACTS4WORKERS approach for monitoring available technologies together with an assessment of their readiness for being used on industrial shop floors. Our approach is based on the creation of a taxonomy of technologies to be considered and the assessment of their readiness following an adaptation of the technology readiness assessment methods defined by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) or European Space Agency (ESA). Further, the approach discussed can be cost-effective, productive, and easily adopted by any company, especially small and medium sized enterprises, which are considering starting an ICT project (with a substantial human computer interaction component). While our approach focuses on technology maturity, we believe that other aspects could also be evaluated to determine the readiness level of a technology to be used on the shop floor, including, for example, the expected benefits for the workers or remaining technology challenges.
Recent digital advancements, including social software, mobile technologies and augmented reality, offer promising opportunities to empower knowledge workers in their production environment by leveraging their knowledge processes, decision-making skills and social interaction practices. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for empowering workers in industrial production environments with digitally facilitated knowledge management processes. The framework explores four concrete facets of digital advancements that apply to a wide range of knowledge processes and production strategies in manufacturing companies. Each of these advancements are capable of supporting one specific facet of the individual knowledge management processes of workers; knowledge transfer, discovery, acquisition and sharing. The study contributes to the production research community by aligning emerging digital technologies and current trends in advanced manufacturing environments to benefit workers and improve job satisfaction, efficiency and productivity. The paper also contains suggestions about developing innovative solutions for production environments that support workers with digital technologies for flexible production.
Alexander Richter
added a research item
This article identifies Digital Work Design (DWD) as a research area and a (grand) challenge of business information systems engineering. Building on a thorough understanding of existing human work practices and the subsequent design and implementation of ICT artifacts, DWD reinstates the human worker at the core of information systems development efforts. This requires an integrated, interdisciplinary, participative, and agile approach, which allows identifying, analyzing, and supporting human work practices and their context in a predominantly digital environment. DWD aims to facilitate current and future work practices of employees through digital technologies. After identifying DWD’s roots in long-standing traditions of workplace studies, we elaborate its key characteristics. Next, we demonstrate through examples how DWD can be applied in manufacturing – from the initial data collection up to the iterative solution development cycle and possible outcomes. To conclude, we mention key points where DWD stands out from other approaches and present an outlook on the future in the form of research questions.
Marlene Schafler
added a research item
The successful introduction of new digital tools and the evaluation of their impacts on the shop floor workers, their skills and work practices are challenging tasks. Research and practice are struggling when it comes to choose and apply the right evaluation approach, methods and measures. In order to contribute to this challenge, we present a study out of the context of a large-scale European implementation project, FACTS4WORKERS (F4W) project, which develops worker-centered smart factory solutions that support knowledge work on the shop floor. Interventions through digitalization are expected to increase workers’ job satisfaction, innovation and problem-solving skills, and productivity. We demonstrate the context-of-use of digital interventions and how we analyse their impacts at four case companies in Germany, Slovenia and Spain. Combining different kinds of assessment - quantitative (surveys) as well as qualitative data (interviews, observations) – we are able to show how the solution extends the workers’ knowledge and competencies and thereby enhances their problem-solving skills. In addition, it provides the workers with up to date information about the current production process due to which the workers will be able to make faster autonomous decisions, hence to better solve problems. The evaluation results enable us to deduce valid implications on how to introduce digital interventions and to design ICT solutions that are supposed to address not only the productivity but particularly focus on the workers’ job satisfaction and innovation skills.
Private Profile
added a research item
With the everyday growth of technology, new possibilities arise to support activities of everyday life. In education and training, more and more digital learning materials are emerging, but there is still room for improvement. This research study describes the implementation of a smart glasses app and infrastructure to support distance learning with WebRTC. The instructor is connected to the learner by a video streaming session and gets the live video stream from the learner’s smart glasses from the learner’s point of view. Additionally, the instructor can draw on the video to add context-aware information. The drawings are immediately sent to the learner to support him to solve a task. The prototype has been qualitatively evaluated by a test user who performed a fine-motor-skills task and a maintenance task under assistance of the remote instructor.
Marlene Schafler
added a research item
Evaluating how an Information Systems (IS) intervention in the workplace affects daily work and impacts on workers and organizations is a challenge that requires a very broad research approach. IS researchers have derived several models to explain and measure IS success, taking various perspectives and system types into account. This study presents an evaluation framework for measuring the impacts of an IS intervention especially at the shop floor in production environments. In this framework, we take a broad scope of examination and apply an integrated model that comprises elements from several methods for analyzing the acceptance and the impact of the new solutions. Thus, the aim is to further develop and enhance the existing methods and models for measuring the acceptance and the impacts of the sociotechnical interventions in production environments.
Private Profile
added a research item
Production SMEs in the automotive value chain/network are increasingly confronted with a serious number of specific requirements and regulations. Compared to large enterprises especially blue-collar workers must deal with shared responsibilities at the shop floor in order to fulfil the different tasks they have to perform. There is a great need of an overall on-the-job knowledge, available in the right time at the right place. In this case workers need seamless learning in real-life situations ("in-situ", pervasive learning), a field which is still emerging, especially in settings of production SMEs. This industrial challenge gives rise to the following research questions: How need such learning services to be designed to achieve a high acceptance rate by learners and/or trainers? What are multimodal input and output interactions as well as interfaces suitable for HCI concepts for learning? How can contextual data be applied for high efficiency and efficacy of context-aware pervasive learning? Therefore, we examine a context-of-use scenario in a metal forming SME for the purpose of developing a mobile pervasive learning system.
Alexander Richter
added a research item
The current wave of digitalization has important implications for manufacturing companies. In this article, we suggest applying the theoretical lens of value co-creation as a comprehensive approach to explore the potential of digitalization trends. We use it to identify the potential of better integrating shop floor workers in the shaping of digital solutions and managerial actions. Insights from two case examples show how improved consideration of cognitive needs and the provision of opportunities for social connection to a community of workers makes them feel more valued, confident, empowered and integrated. This can balance other forms of frustrations and negative emotions, leading to a better perception of the overall relationship experience at the shop floor.
Alexander Richter
added a research item
Despite the advent of a flurry of digital technologies, paper prevails on manufacturing shopfloors. To understand the roles and value of paper on the shopfloor, we have studied the manufacturing practices at two state-of-the-art automotive supplier facilities, applying ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, as well as photo and document analysis. We find that paper has unique affordances that today's digital technologies cannot easily supplant on current shopfloors. More specifically, we find four paper practices: (1) creating and adapting individual information spaces, (2) reinterpreting information, (3) combining information handover with social interaction, and (4) visual cuing. We discuss these practices and the unique affordances of paper that currently support shopfloor workers and also consider the limitations of paper, which are becoming increasingly apparent, since more tasks increasingly depend on real-time information.
Marlene Schafler
added 2 research items
This paper presents results of a current EU project, which deals with the development of information and communication technologies for production workers of the future. On the basis of different case studies selected from the project context the paper will illustrate the technologies that can be used by industrial companies to put blue-collar workers at the center of tomorrow's factory. In EMO – Orodjarna we are confronted with the individual production of die tools. The production process is very complicated to gather all the necessary production data in the assembly line in the right moment. To support and increase worker productivity this data needs to be transformed into meaningful information and it has to be provided in an appropriate way. We try to support workers with digital tools to access and process information with user-centric interfaces that will enable them to find and use the necessary information in the assembly line. This approach will increase job satisfaction and motivation of the workers, and have positive effects on collaboration with co-workers, solving problems and generating new ideas.
This paper presents the evaluation strategy and the first results we obtained when we used the FACTS4WORKERS evaluation framework. The purpose of the framework is to prove whether the project interventions achieve the expected results, which are: improving workers' job satisfaction, increasing innovation and problem solving skills as well as enhancing productivity. Because of the diversity of the industrial partners and of the workplaces where the interventions are going to be implemented, the different languages, legal and cultural environments the framework was conceived as general as possible to be adapted to any particular case. We present here one example for using the framework, the first results of these measurements and the feedback the evaluation provides both for supporting the decisions about the interventions and about the framework itself.
Francisco José Lacueva
added a research item
Evaluating how an Information Systems (IS) intervention in the workplace affects daily work and impacts on workers and organizations is a challenge that requires a very broad research approach. IS researchers have derived several models to explain and measure IS success, taking various perspectives and system types into account. This study presents an evaluation framework for measuring the impacts of an IS intervention especially at the shop floor in production environments. In this framework, we take a broad scope of examination and apply an integrated model that comprises elements from several methods for analyzing the acceptance and the impact of the new solutions. Thus, the aim is to further develop and enhance the existing methods and models for measuring the acceptance and the impacts of the sociotechnical interventions in production environments.
Alexander Richter
added a research item
Die „Digitalisierung der Industrie“ und Schlagworte wie „Industrie 4.0“ und „Smart Factory“ sind aktuell in aller Munde. Doch gleichzeitig fällt es vielen Praktikern und Forschern schwer, diese Begriffe einzuordnen, um konkrete Anwendungsfälle für Innovationsprojekte zu identifizieren. Insbesondere die (neue) Rolle des Mitarbeiters beschäftigt Unternehmen und Angestellte. Hier setzt der vorliegende Beitrag an. Es wird ein aktuell laufendes EU-Projekt vorgestellt, das sich mit der Entwicklung von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien (IKT) für Produktionsarbeiter der Zukunft auseinandersetzt. Vier aus dem Projektkontext gewählte Fallbeispiele illustrieren, wie IKT sich in Industriebetrieben einsetzen lassen, um den Menschen in den Mittelpunkt der Fabrik von morgen zu rücken. Darauf aufbauend wird gezeigt, inwiefern die Befähigung der Produktionsmitarbeiter in den vier Bereichen (1) Autonomie, (2) Kompetenz, (3) Verbundenheit und (4) Abwechslungsreichtum in der Fabrik von morgen durch neue IKT gesteigert werden kann. So ermöglicht der Beitrag einerseits die Orientierung an konkreten Anwendungsfällen und deren Reflexion sowie andererseits die Entwicklung eines ganzheitlichen Verständnisses für die sich derzeit und in den kommenden Jahren vollziehenden Veränderungen in vielen Industrieunternehmen.
Alexander Stocker
added 3 research items
Increasing demands for innovative products and rising competition lead manufacturing companies to design more flexible and efficient production environments. Thus, factory work becomes increasingly knowledge intensive. Recent developments of digital technologies including social software, mobile technologies and augmented reality offer promising opportunities to empower knowledge workers, but lead also to sociotechnical challenges. We explore opportunities and challenges and show that they are applicable for a wide range of production strategies and manufacturing companies. Our study suggests genres of technologies to support knowledge work for tomorrow's flexible production. It also extends the knowledge related to current trends and emerging technologies in advanced manufacturing environments to empower workers and to improve job satisfaction, efficiency and productivity.
Notwithstanding the important push of the term “Industrie 4.0” towards research funding agencies in German-speaking countries, its fuzziness makes it challenging for researchers and practitioners to identify concrete application scenarios for innovation projects. The paper at hand enters the debate at this point: First of all, a systematic analysis of 35 big related EU research projects contributes to a better thematic orientation. Next, we introduce a current EU project looking into research and development of information and communication technology (ICT) for the production worker of the future. Three case studies from this EU project illustrate what kind of ICT can be implemented by industrial enterprises to put the human worker into the heart of future factories. The dimension of the “empowered worker” serves us to show how workers at factories of the future gain (1) autonomy, (2) competency, (3) connectedness and (4) work variety trough newly introduced ICT. Thus, the paper at hand facilitates the orientation towards concrete use cases and their reflection, and at the same time it facilitates the development of a comprehensive understanding for current and future transformations in many industrial enterprises.
Private Profile
added a research item
Smart Glasses and 3D printers are now easily available on the market. The challenge is how to integrate them efficiently in a learning environment. This paper suggests a project-based learning (PBL) scenario how to construct, produce and assemble a planetary gear using Open Source tools, LEGO® Technic, 3D printers and Smart Glasses. The whole project-based learning scenario was implemented together with a 16-year-old student. Additionally, the assembly process using Smart Glasses was tested by seven users in a qualitative evaluation. The feedback of the student of the target group together with the feedback of other subjects was considered to improve the PBL scenario and the Smart Glasses (ReconJet) application. The evaluation showed the potential of Smart Glasses to improve hands-free assembly processes and supports the user to understand the structure and functionality of mechanical objects.
Alexander Richter
added 2 research items
A new generation of information technology (IT), promises significant benefits for manufacturing companies in their daily work. However, the companies are rather slow in taking advantage of the opportunities offered by the current wave of digitalization. This paper starts with an overview of emerging sociotechnical trends in manufacturing. We discuss technology as catalyser of this transformation process and its impact on individual and organisational levels. The intense collaboration with six manufacturing companies in a European project allowed us to identify and further specify four digital challenges: 1) Digitally augmented human work, 2) Worker-centric knowledge sharing, 3) Self-learning manufacturing workplaces, and 4) In-situ mobile learning. The four digital challenges illustrate how companies (can) embrace emerging sociotechnical trends in manufacturing and thus contribute to a better understanding of the changing role of IT on the Shop Floor.
A new generation of information technology (IT), promises significant benefits for manufacturing companies in their daily work. However, the companies are rather slow in taking advantage of the opportunities offered by the current wave of digitalization. This paper starts with an overview of emerging sociotechnical trends in manufacturing. We discuss technology as catalyser of this transformation process and its impact on individual and organisational levels. The intense collaboration with six manufacturing companies in a European project allowed us to identify and further specify four digital challenges: 1) Digitally augmented human work, 2) Worker-centric knowledge sharing, 3) Self-learning manufacturing workplaces, and 4) In-situ mobile learning. The four digital challenges illustrate how companies (can) embrace emerging sociotechnical trends in manufacturing and thus contribute to a better understanding of the changing role of IT on the Shop Floor.
Marlene Schafler
added a research item
Increased levels of automation at modern workplaces in industry, business, and transportation generally increase safety and productivity but sometimes negatively impact the ability to withstand unexpected adverse events. A side effect of such high levels of automation can result in humans performing fewer macrocognitive functions which can lead to reduced adaptability. In this paper we address this issue by identifying an integrative psychological framework to guide the design of technological and non-technological interventions for increased system resilience. The framework is derived from approaches in cognitive psychology, human factors, and neurobiology and focuses on the facilitation of positive appraisal processes. We present this framework to solicit feedback and to subsequently apply it to the design of resilient systems in advanced manufacturing and automated driving.
Francisco José Lacueva
added a research item
D2.2, Technology Monitoring: Report on information needed for the Industrial Challenges workers with taxonomy is part of the work in progress of “FACTorieS for WORKERS” (FACTS4WORKERS). It is the result of the execution of T2.1 in 2016. T2.1 is an activity of WP2 aiming to highlight the current state of the applicable technologies (both hardware and software) which can be used for implementing Worker Centred Industry 4.0 solutions, which are already applicable and under which risks. D2.2 advance in objectively answering questions like: Which are the available HCI enabling technologies that can support the creation of Worker Centred Industry 4.0? Have the available HCI enabling technologies a TRL enough for supporting FACTS4WORKER goals? Is it possible to objectively determine the TRL level of a technology? Which is the TRL level of a system of technologies? Once we evaluated our technologist of interest, how we can read it?, Which are the conclusion we can obtain from it?. D2.2 takes D2.1 as base for answering these questions. We tried to answer them by following an iterative three steps process: define a methodology for creating, evaluating and reading a taxonomy of (HCI) enabling technologies; apply the methodology for creating a taxonomy; use the not clearly resolved issues or not resolved at all ones by the methodology to identify opportunities of improvement of the methodology This report summarizes the work we did during last year. It redefines the methodology introduced in D2.2, it applies the methodology to the FACTS4WORKERS project and it shows our conclusions about the industrial readiness of the technologies of interest and about the methodology. The FACTSTWORKERS taxonomy is published as a digital appendix of this report (please, see references).
Alexander Stocker
added a research item
In Unternehmen mit komplexen Produkten und Dienstleistungen wachsen Anforderungen, die an die Kommunikation und Zusammenarbeit zwischen Informations- und Wissensarbeitern gestellt werden stetig. Dieser Workshop will vor dem Hintergrund eines durch die Initiatoren im Rahmen des Programmes „Factory of the Future“ angestrebten EU-Projekts eine Plattform schaffen, um aktuelle und zukünftige Fragestellungen rund um den Einsatz neuer Informationssysteme in Smart Factories interdisziplinär zu diskutieren. Der Workshop baut auch auf eine Reihe an bisher vorangegangenen Workshops auf, welche das Thema soziale Interaktion in Organisationen aus unterschiedlichen Gesichtspunkten beleuchtet haben, spricht Praktiker und Wissenschaftler an, die in den letzten Jahren an diesen Workshops teilgenommen haben und ist daran interessiert diese Community und die betrachteten Fragestellungen zu erweitern.
Gianni Campatelli
added a research item
Due to the rapid technologic change, we see the role of manufacturing workers continuously changing: the increasing automation of manufacturing processes has reduced the amount of manual work, whereas the increasing complexity of manufacturing systems requires workers to build-up broader and deeper skills. In this paper, the authors suggest a participative knowledge management approach to empower manufacturing workers. Starting from a comprehensive empirical analysis of the existing work practices in a manufacturing company, the authors have developed and validated a knowledge management system prototype. The prototype is aimed for training, problem solving, and facilitating the discovery, acquisition, and sharing of manufacturing knowledge. The conducted evaluation of the prototype indicates that workers' skills and level of work satisfaction will increase since the knowledge management system allows faster problem solving by finding better solutions for observed defects.
Private Profile
added a research item
Zusammenfassung Im Kontext der ,,Industrie 4.0“ werden Datenbrillen häufig als innovative Endgeräte angeführt, weil sie große Potenziale besitzen, die Informationsversorgung bei der Arbeit zu verbessern, ohne den Produktionsmitarbeiter in seiner Bewegungsfähigkeit einzuschränken. So können Datenbrillen dazu genutzt werden, Checklisten und Arbeitsanweisungen direkt an der Maschine oder am Werkstück digital abzuarbeiten bzw. auszuführen, ohne dabei die Hände zur Eingabe an einer Tastatur zu benutzen. In aktuellen Projekten ist dabei beabsichtigt, aus dem Consumer-Bereich stammende leistungsfähige und dabei vergleichsweise kostengünstige Datenbrillen im Produktions- bzw. Serviceumfeld zu verwenden. Doch derzeit existieren nur wenige empirische Studien, bei denen diesbezüglich entwickelte Demonstratoren systematisch mit Nutzern evaluiert wurden, um empirisch überprüfbare Erkenntnisse hinsichtlich Anwendungspotenzial und Akzeptanz von Datenbrillen zu gewinnen. Vor diesem Hintergrund wurde eine datenbrillengestützte Checkliste für die Fahrzeugmontage als Demonstrator entwickelt und gemeinsam mit Fachexperten aus der Automotive-Domäne empirisch untersucht. Die Ergebnisse haben gezeigt, dass Datenbrillen durchaus über ein Nutzenpotenzial verfügen, wenngleich ihr Einsatz gegenwärtig noch mit bedeutenden Nachteilen aus Sicht der Nutzer verbunden ist. Der Beitrag leitet eine Reihe an Nutzeranforderungen ab, um Nutzungsmöglichkeiten von Datenbrillen weiter zu verbessern.
Francisco José Lacueva
added 3 research items
D2.1, Technology Monitoring: Report on Information Needed for the Industrial Challenges Workers with Taxonomy is part of the work in progress of the “FACTorieS for WORKERS” (FACTS4WORKERS) project and specifically of the T2.1 task of WP2. WP2, Worker-centric HCI/HMI Building Blocks, aims to develop (in a co-creation process with shop-floor staff) the smart factory solution’s worker-centric HCI/HMI building blocks, characterised by maximum usability, user experience (UX) and technology acceptance. As a preliminary work, or expressed as “parallel guiding work”, Task 2.1, Analysis of Technical Requirements and Technology Monitoring will create and maintain a state of the art regarding available and trending technologies (devices, software developments and tools etc.) within the very dynamic field of today’s HCI technology (smart glasses, smart textiles etc.). Furthermore, Task 2.1 will review new (disrupting) HCI paradigms and will relate them to already established (and sometimes outdated) HCI paradigms. D2.1 is the result of the work of T2.1. Its final objective is to create a vision of the current and future developments of HCI technologies and paradigms that will allow other WP2 tasks to obtain the maximum benefit when implementing HCI building blocks, as well as support future technologies adaptation as they become available during the project execution. D2.1 will also provide a general evaluation of existing technologies considering their applicability on the factories’ shop floor but always observing project objectives and industrial challenges reflected in the project proposal. The technologies evaluation will be provided as a taxonomy of technologies that will be evaluated on a TRL-based scale. The taxonomy will be updated in subsequent versions in order to track the technology maturity evolution during the project life. It will also comment on the observed state of technology.
This document represents Deliverable 6.1 (“Evaluation Framework”) of the H2020 project “FACTS4WORKERS -Worker-Centric Workplaces in Smart Factories” (FoF 2014/636778). The Evaluation Framework, as main tool used for reaching WP6 goals (to evaluate the impact of the project solutions on the workers), contributes to all other project’s WPs, generating data for iterating initial requirements and for evolving the designed solutions. That’s why we firstly point the relationship between the work to be performed in WP6 and the rest of WPs. The evaluation of how the introduction of solutions (including ICT) in the workplace affects the daily work and impacts on the worker implies a very broad research scope. Very different and complementary research lines are involved in that purpose, and we establish the rationale of the framework in a wide range of methods and tools among which we will choose those most appropriate for the purpose of the framework. The evaluation framework is defined then. Taking into account the available rationale and background, but with the project idiosyncrasy in mind, we establish our primary evaluation targets and process. FACTS4WORKERS tries to change the worker’s practices, using the help of ICT tools (but not only leveraging on them). This is going beyond of just to evaluate the deployed solutions. That’s why the evaluation framework is defined in terms of the validation and impact assessment of the introduced new practices (with the difficulty to separate this impact from other factors), which is going a step further of just using a subset of methods and tools detailed in the rationale.
Workers’ job satisfaction is considered a critical indicator for the effectiveness of socio-technical interventions in the work place. However, job satisfaction represents a complex psychological phenomenon with many contributing factors that can be difficult to assess. To facilitate assessments of job satisfaction we review psychological theories and metrics of job satisfaction to investigate implications for socio-technical interventions. The findings suggest that the design and introduction of socio-technical workplace interventions that impact workers’ job satisfaction need to take into account and adapt to worker-specific characteristics.
Francisco José Lacueva
added an update
Hi all,
Samanta and Rok are going to create an official FACTS4WORKERS project on Research Gate and they will invite all us and other members of the project to collaborate on it.
So I will remove this project as the new one would be created.
Br.
 
Francisco José Lacueva
added a project goal
Worker-Centric Workplaces in Smart Factories (FACTS4WORKERS.EU) is a project coordinated by VIRTUAL VEHICLE in the Horizon 2020 program of the European Commission within the Factory of the Future PPP. The vision of FACTS4WORKERS is to leverage the large potential added value of manufacturing data, information and knowledge in a worker-centred way to achieve worker empowerment, resulting in higher worker satisfaction and increased worker productivity.
It is the high ambition of our project to create “FACTorieS for WORKERS” (FACTS4WORKERS), therefore a serious effort will be put into integrating already available IT enablers into a seamless & flexible Smart Factory infrastructure based on worker-centric and data-driven technology building blocks. As FACTS4WORKERS is underpinned by a clear human-centric approach: usability, user experience and technology acceptance are of the utmost project interest.
FACTS4WORKERS will develop and demonstrate workplace solutions that support the inclusion of increasing elements of knowledge work on the factory floor. These solutions will empower workers on the shop floor with smart factory ICT infrastructure. Advancement will be gained through integrating several building blocks from a flexible smart factory infrastructure, focusing on workers’ needs, expectations and requirements, and being supported by organisational measures and change management. In line with our assumptions on impacts on productivity we therefore estimate that that we can increase job satisfaction for 800,000 European workers by the year 2025.
These solutions will be developed according to the following four industrial challenges which are generalise-able to manufacturing in general: personalised augmented operator, worked-centric rich-media knowledge sharing/management, self-learning manufacturing workplaces and in-situ mobile learning in the production.
Moreover, FACT4WORKER‘s objectives in terms of measureable indicators are:
TO INCREASE PROBLEM-SOLVING AND INNOVATION SKILLS OF WORKERS;
TO INCREASE COGNITIVE JOB SATISFACTION OF WORKERS PARTICIPATING IN THE PILOTS;
TO INCREASE AVERAGE WORKER PRODUCTIVITY BY 10% FOR WORKERS PARTICIPATING IN PILOTS;
TO ACHIEVE TRL 5-7 ON A NUMBER OF WORKER-CENTRIC SOLUTIONS THROUGH WHICH WORKERS BECOME THE SMART ELEMENT IN SMART FACTORIES.
The smart factory demonstrator will be run within the automotive supply chain. The consortium is composed by 15 partners from 7 different EU member states including tier-1, -2 and -3 suppliers, large production enterprises and individual factories that are representative of many medium-sized manufacturing operations, manufacturing SMEs, universities and excellent research institutes.