Project

Experience design methods and tools

Goal: Developing or adapting methods for the design and evaluation of user experiences (UX).

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Carine Lallemand
added 4 research items
The psychological needs-driven UX approach is a well-explored area in UX research and a powerful framework for the design of optimal experiences with systems and products. However, the transfer from research to practice is slow and this approach is not yet widely used by practitioners. As card-based methods have been shown to support designers in both the generation of ideas and the evaluation of their designs, we created the UX needs cards as a pragmatic tool able to support a needs-driven UX process. We present the iterative development of the card-set and its associated techniques and report on three use cases, demonstrating the effectiveness of this tool for user research, idea generation and UX evaluation. Our empirical findings suggest that the UX needs cards are a valuable tool able to support design practice, being easily understood by lay users and a source of inspiration for designers. Acting as a tangible translation of a research framework, the UX needs cards promote theory-driven design strategies and provide researchers, designers, and educators with a tool to clearly communicate the framework of psychological needs.
In this contribution, we present three teaching activities used during a User Evaluation Methods course (Bachelor level): a self-exploration of methods, scenario-based debates around methodological choices, and a flipped-classroom video assignment. These are hands-on activities, brief and modular, that can be used or adapted to any similar course on user evaluation methods (on-campus or remote teaching). We describe each activity and reflect on their use, supported by students' reflections on the course and insights from our teaching practice.
Carine Lallemand
added 13 research items
RÉSUMÉ Depuis une dizaine d'années, le concept d'expérience utilisateur (UX) se répand dans le domaine des Interactions Homme-Machine (IHM). Centré sur l'utilisateur et son expérience subjective vécue de l'interaction avec un système interactif, l'UX s'intéresse, entre autres, aux aspects émotionnels, hédoniques ou encore esthétiques composant l'interaction. Cependant, bien que déjà très utilisé par les professionnels, ce concept souffre notamment d'un manque de recherche empirique. De plus, de nombreuses définitions et perspectives sur l'UX cohabitent sans donner lieu à un consensus scientifique clair. Or, pour progresser dans ce champ de recherche, l'enseigner, ou pour communiquer sur celui-ci, il est nécessaire de mieux le comprendre et le délimiter. Une enquête par questionnaire (adaptée de Law et al., 2009) réalisée sur 758 professionnels et chercheurs de plus de 35 nationalités permet de mieux comprendre comment ce concept est compris et utilisé à travers le monde. Les résultats montrent des divergences entre les profils des participants.
There is much work in the CHI community about the 'industry-academia divide', and how to bridge it. One key crossover between HCI/UX scientists and practitioners is the development and use of tools and methods-boundary objects between academia and practice. Among other forms of collaboration, there is an underdeveloped opportunity for academics to make use of industry events (conferences, meetups, design jams) as a research venue in the context of tool and method development. This paper describes three cases from work in academia-industry engagement over the last decade, in which workshops or experiments have been run at industry events as a way of trialling and developing tools directly with practitioners. We discuss advantages of this approach and extract key insights and practical implications, highlighting how the CHI community might use this method more widely, gathering relevant research outcomes while contributing to knowledge exchange between academia and practice.
Carine Lallemand
added a project goal
Developing or adapting methods for the design and evaluation of user experiences (UX).