Project

Examining Interpretations of Civic National Values made by Young People in Post Conflict Settings (An intercontinental comparative project between UK, Kenya and Nepal)

Goal: Empower children in post-conflict settings, to articulate their interpretations and shared communications of civic national values through their creation of a performance arts-based 'scheme of work’ as a process of transformative learning for supporting local and global Civil Service Organisations (CSOs) in reducing poverty and advancing education for all as part of the peace-building process.

Date: 31 March 2019 - 30 September 2019

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Project log

Marlon Lee Moncrieffe
added a research item
This article shares our international research project led by UK and East African stakeholders. This was framed as a consolidation of learning in our analysis and evaluation of findings from four Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) projects. • Mobile Arts for Peace (Rwanda) • Young people’s interpretations of civic national values (Kenya) • Connective Memories (Rwanda) • Reanimating Contested Spaces (Rwanda).
Marlon Lee Moncrieffe
added an update
In the UK, national policies for citizenship are directing schools and teachers to engage young-people with communicating their interpretations of national values (DfE, 2014). It stems from The Prevent Strategy (HM Government, 2011), a post 7/7 counter-terrorism educational policy that seeks to arrest the potential of young-people becoming radicalised by terrorist organisations in opposition to ‘fundamental British values’ (DfE, 2014: 4). A common approach by primary schools has been to enact policy through arts-based approaches. Research by Moncrieffe and Moncrieffe (2019, 2017) examine choices in the use of images, icons and symbols on primary school display boards by children for their interpretations and shared communications of national values. From an International and comparative perspective, post-election turmoil and ‘issues related with cultural integration’ Kenya has laid the foundation for the national policy on creating ‘Engaged, Empowered & Ethical Citizens’ through ‘Values’ education in Kenya (Basic Education Curriculum Framework, 2017: 12). In the Kenyan context, our project aims to understand how national policy for citizenship education could become transformed and reified as best practice through participatory arts-based methodologies, seeking to inform and guide future approaches to policymaking and curriculum design. For this study, the Kenyan context is placed alongside long instability and armed conflict in Nepal. It has led to the country becoming a federal state with several powers devolved to elected local governments including the provision of basic education. The teaching of ‘values’ is a core aspect of that basic education. Our application of ‘Citizen Led Assessments’ in understanding the implementation of local approaches to ‘values’ education and through the testing of participatory art-based methodologies will help with the leading and the adoption of best practice to inform future policymaking and curriculum. The Kenyan context and the Nepalese context will apply the same processes of testing and analysis to gather insights on how local policy can be transformed by fresh approaches to practice to inform policymaking at both national and international levels. Our comparative project will inform CSO practice by its localised context; it is of national governmental interest by its potential impact on future policy i.e. curriculum design; it is a project that can have international impact via the Changing the Story global network and particularly for informing the work of CSOs; the future work of teacher-trainers and teachers in response to SDG 1 – No Poverty; SDG 4 – Quality Education and SDG 16 – Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions. The comparative context of this Phase 2 project provides an extremely valuable opportunity to develop the original research questions and findings made by ‘Changing the Story’ in Phase 1 which includes sharing and offering robust evidenced-based comparison of work and arts-based research across European, African and Asian contexts, which can then be used, applied and sustained in Phase 3 of ‘Changing the Story’. The connected research contexts for this project will offer strong opportunities and a voice for children as researchers, activists, curriculum designers to speak back high-level policymakers and development agencies in both local and global contexts.
 
Marlon Lee Moncrieffe
added an update
1. What can be learned from CSOs work on peacebuilding through their engagement with existing local or national policies of arts-based and citizenship education for the teaching, learning and sharing of ‘civic national values’ between young-people?
1.1. How have children in the Kenya and Nepal responded to CSO attempts to deal with the legacies and issues faced today?
1.2. What are the ‘congruent features’ of citizenship education policies in Kenya and Nepal for teaching, learning and sharing ‘civic national values’?
1.3. How can these ‘congruent features’ be categorised and applied in response to SDG 1 – No Poverty; SDG 4 – Quality Education and SDG 16 – Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions by reconceptualising approaches to pedagogy through a participatory arts-based ‘scheme of work’ for children?
2. How can CSOs support teachers and facilitate children in their shared communications of 'civic national values’ through the application of arts-based tools and techniques, and as part of a ‘scheme of work’ for teaching and learning?
2.1. How can children work in synergy with their local context, community and teachers in leading the design of innovative teaching and learning about ‘civic national values’ through participatory arts-based led activities.
2.2. How do young-people represent and communicate ‘civic national values’ by their own conceptions, actions and reflections for an increased sense of empowerment in their application of arts-based activities?
3. How do young-people and CSOs analyse and reflect on the impact made by the 'scheme of work' for teaching and learning about ‘civic national values’?
3.1. As part of the participatory process, how do CSOs and young-people and teachers in Kenyan contexts respond to and evaluate the ‘Scheme of Work’?
3.2. As part of the participatory process, how do CSOs and young-people and teachers in Nepal respond to the ‘Scheme of Work’?
3.3. What are the congruent features from the comparative responses between participants in Kenya and Nepal?
3.4. How do these congruent features from comparative contexts consolidate and advance findings from Phase 1 of Changing the Story?
3.5. How do these congruent features from comparative contexts relate to wider Phase 2 Changing the Story contexts?
3.6. How do these findings feed into future Phase 3 Changing the Story planning and research developments including responses to SDG 1 – No Poverty; SDG 4 – Quality Education and SDG 16 – Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions?
 
Marlon Lee Moncrieffe
added an update
1. Explore and understand how children in post-conflict settings interpret civic national values by their own conceptions, actions and reflections, supported in their application of varied performance arts-based tools and techniques for their shared communications.
2. Facilitate children in post-conflict settings to develop and advance their thinking about the past; the present and future possibilities of peacebuilding through theories of ‘reflection'.
3. Facilitate children and our research partners to continuously analyse, reflect and reconceptualise their understandings and shared communications of civic national values for advancing future policymaking through a performance arts-based 'scheme of work' that can be applied locally, nationally and internationally in comparative contexts.
 
Marlon Lee Moncrieffe
added a project goal
Empower children in post-conflict settings, to articulate their interpretations and shared communications of civic national values through their creation of a performance arts-based 'scheme of work’ as a process of transformative learning for supporting local and global Civil Service Organisations (CSOs) in reducing poverty and advancing education for all as part of the peace-building process.