Project

European Network on Individualized Psychotherapy Treatment of Young People with Mental Disorders (TREATme)

Goal: The main aim of the COST Action TREATme funded by European Comission is to establish a sustainable European multidisciplinary researcher network focusing on individualized psychotherapy for young people with mental disorders. 30 European countries are represented in the TREATme.

The Action reviews the state of the art and identifies putative specific markers and mechanisms of change in different psychotherapy modalities, as well as suitable psychotherapy process and treatment measures, and study designs.

The network promotes collaborative funding applications and meets societal challenges connected to mental health. TREATme paves the way for the matching of mental health research to the needs of young people in Europe.

For more information please visit: https://www.treat-me.eu/

Date: 31 May 2017

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Vera Gergov
added 3 research items
The aim of this study was to examine cross-cultural differences, as operationalized by Schwartz's refined theory of basic values, in burnout levels among psychotherapists from 12 European countries during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. We focused on the multilevel approach to investigate if individual- and country-aggregated level values could explain differences in burnout intensity after controlling for sociodemographic, work-related characteristics and COVID-19-related distress among participants. 2915 psychotherapists from 12 countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Finland, Great Britain, Serbia, Spain, Norway, Poland, Romania, Sweden, and Switzerland) participated in this study. The participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey, the revised version of the Portrait Values Questionnaire, and a survey questionnaire on sociodemographic, work-related factors and the COVID-19 related distress. In general, the lowest mean level of burnout was noted for Romania, whereas the highest mean burnout intensity was reported for Cyprus. Multilevel analysis revealed that burnout at the individual level was negatively related to self-transcendence and openness-to-change but positively related to self-enhancement and conservation values. However, no significant effects on any values were observed at the country level. Male sex, younger age, being single, and reporting higher COVID-19-related distress were significant burnout correlates. Burnout among psychotherapists may be a transcultural phenomenon, where individual differences among psychotherapists are likely to be more important than differences between the countries of their practice. This finding enriches the discussion on training in psychotherapy in an international context and draws attention to the neglected issue of mental health among psychotherapists in the context of their professional functioning.
Objective The aim of this study to examine the amount of the total variance of the subjective well-being (SWB) of psychotherapists from 12 European countries explained by between-country vs. between-person differences regarding its cognitive (life satisfaction) and affective components (positive affect [PA] and negative affect [NA]). Second, we explored a link between the SWB and their personal (self-efficacy) and social resources (social support) after controlling for sociodemographics, work characteristics, and COVID-19-related distress. Methods In total, 2915 psychotherapists from 12 countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Finland, Great Britain, Serbia, Spain, Norway, Poland, Romania, Sweden, and Switzerland) participated in this study. The participants completed the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the International Positive and Negative Affect Schedule Short Form (I-PANAS-SF), the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Results Cognitive well-being (CWB; satisfaction with life) was a more country-dependent component of SWB than affective well-being (AWB). Consequently, at the individual level, significant correlates were found only for AWB but not for CWB. Higher AWB was linked to being female, older age, higher weekly workload, and lower COVID-19-related distress. Self-efficacy and social support explained AWB only, including their main effects and the moderating effect of self-efficacy. Conclusions The results highlight more individual characteristics of AWB compared to CWB, with a more critical role of low self-efficacy for the link between social support and PA rather than NA. This finding suggests the need for greater self-care among psychotherapists with regard to their AWB and the more complex conditions underlying their CWB.
Objective The aim of this study was to examine cross-cultural differences, as operationalized by Schwartz's refined theory of basic values, in burnout levels among psychotherapists from 12 European countries during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. We focused on the multilevel approach to investigate if individual- and country-aggregated level values could explain differences in burnout intensity after controlling for sociodemographic and work-related characteristics and COVID-19-related distress among participants. Methods In this study, 2915 psychotherapists from 12 countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Finland, Great Britain, Serbia, Spain, Norway, Poland, Romania, Sweden, and Switzerland) participated in this study. The participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey, the revised version of the Portrait Values Questionnaire, and a survey questionnaire on sociodemographic and work-related factors. Results Multilevel analysis revealed that burnout at the individual level was negatively related to self-transcendence and openness-to-change values but positively related to self-enhancement and conservation values. However, no significant effects on any values were observed at the country level. Moreover, male sex, younger age, being single, and reporting higher COVID-19-related distress were identified as significant burnout correlates. Conclusions Burnout among psychotherapists may be a transcultural phenomenon, where individual differences among psychotherapists are likely to be more important than differences between the countries of their practice. This finding enriches the discussion on training in psychotherapy in an international context and draws attention to the neglected issue of mental health among psychotherapists in the context of their professional functioning.
Vera Gergov
added a research item
Background: Psychotic disorders are commonly accompanied by intense psychological burden, and psychological interventions are usually needed in order to reduce the symptoms and help in maintaining or improving the level of psychological and social functioning after the onset of psychosis. The evidence-base for treating young people at risk for psychosis and adults with psychotic disorders is accumulating. Yet, pervasive systematic literature reviews that would include patients from the full age range being the most essential period for the risk of developing a psychotic disorder, a wide range of psychological interventions, and various types of clinical trials, have been lacking. The aim of this systematic review is to fill the gap by presenting the current research evidence from clinical trials on the effectiveness of psychological interventions for treating young people (12–30) with psychotic disorders. Methods: A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and PsycINFO followed by a 3-step screening process based on the PICOS strategy. Risk of bias of the included studies was assessed by the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Extracted data from the included studies is reported using a narrative synthesis. Results: Of the 1,449 publications screened, 40 from 25 studies were included in the review. Of these, 10 studies reported results from cognitive or behavioral therapy, nine from cognitive remediation therapy (CRT), and six from other types of therapies (i.e., integrative interventions combining psychoeducation and family/group interventions). All but one study found the target interventions to be effective, but the results mostly did not differ significantly from the control conditions in reducing symptoms and improving functioning, preventing relapses and hospitalization, or improving psychological or family variables. The most consistent findings were from CRT, showing more improvement in cognitive functioning compared to control conditions while not being superior in reducing symptom severity. Integrative interventions might be effective in treating young people suffering from psychotic disorders. Conclusion: There is some evidence that psychological interventions are effective for young people with psychotic disorders. However, with regard to symptom severity, psychotherapy does not outperform control conditions, and the results do not strongly favor any specific type of treatment.
Giada Pietrabissa
added a research item
Editorial on the Research Topic Individualized Psychotherapy Treatment of Young People With Mental Disorders Applied practice-oriented psychotherapy research is of great significance in youth mental health, as research in this specific age group lacks dismantling studies for prosperous or hindering factors concerning engagement into change processes and efficacy. The advancements of the work consist of conceptual considerations for the treatment planning, assessment of several also subjectively relevant factors, the importance of the accessibility and preparedness of the (social) environment, as well as intrapsychic resistance or resilience factors. Qualitative studies and research designs of all evidence levels provide insight into the facilitation of treatment for young people. This Research Topic provides an overview of studies on psychotherapeutic treatment for young people and employs different research methods for an in-depth investigation of predictors for successful outcomes, barriers and facilitators, and factors enabling engagement of young people in psychotherapy. Specific recommendations on how to effectively measure mental phenomena and address psychological difficulties in this particular age group are also investigated and provided. Indeed, articles included in this Research Topic focus on testing how to assess emotional factors, besides configuring future contributions to fill research gaps in this area that also consider mediators and theories of change in psychotherapy. Overall, psychotherapy has been found effective for the treatment of mental health problems in youth. The systematic review of studies proposed by Midgley et al., for instance, provides a narrative synthesis of the evidence for the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy in treating a wide range of mental health difficulties in children and adolescents. Findings from this study also highlight that this approach may be especially effective for internalizing disorders such as depression and anxiety, for treating emerging personality disorders or children who have experienced adversities. In the contribution by Gergov et al. psychological symptoms and distress also decreased significantly during the course of the treatment (including psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive, crisis-and trauma-focused therapy, family therapy, art, and occupational therapies), with better results occurring within the first 6 months from treatment initiation. Intensive psychotherapy offered for a shorter period was the strongest predictor of good outcomes among
Jose M. Mestre
added a research item
Background Externalising behaviours are becoming a remarkably prevalent problem during adolescence, often precipitating both externalising and internalising disorders in later adulthood. Psychological treatments aim to increase the social functioning of adolescents in order for them to live a more balanced life and prevent these negative trajectories. However, little is known of the intervening variables and mediators involved in these treatments' change mechanisms. We conducted a systematic review, exploring the available evidence on mediators of psychological treatments for externalising behaviours and symptoms amongst adolescents (10 to 19 years old). Methods A systematic search was performed on Medline and PsycINFO databases, which identified studies from inception to February 23, 2020. Eligible studies included randomised controlled trials that enrolled adolescents with externalising symptoms and behaviours as, at least, one of the primary outcomes. A group of 20 reviewers from the COST-Action TREATme (CA16102) were divided into 10 pairs. Each pair independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted information from the included studies, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and the requirements for mediators, following Kazdin's criteria. Risk of bias of RCTs was assessed by the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Extracted data from the included studies were reported using a narrative synthesis. Results Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines (PRISMA), after removing duplicates, 3,660 articles were screened. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. In a second stage, 965 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. A total of 14 studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria. The majority were related to systemic psychological treatment approaches. Two types of mediators were identified as potentially being involved in the mechanisms of change for better social improvements of adolescents: to increase healthier parent–adolescent relationships and parental discipline. However, there were significant and non-significant results amongst the same mediators, which led to discussing the results tentatively. Conclusions Family variables were found to be the largest group of investigated mediators, followed by relational, behavioural, and emotional variables. No cognitive or treatment-specific mediators were identified. Both adequate behavioural control of adolescents' peer behaviour and a better positive balance in their relationships with their parents seemed to buffer the effects of externalising behaviours in adolescents. Several methodological limitations concerning mediation testing design, outcome measures, and mediator selection have been identified. Ethics and Dissemination Ethical approval was not required. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42021231835.
Celia Sales
added a research item
Various health settings have advocated for involving patients and members of the public (PPI) in research as a means to increase quality and relevance of the produced knowledge. However, youth PPI has been an understudied area. This protocol paper describes a new project that aims to summarize what is known about PPI with young people in mental health research. In line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement guidelines we will identify and appraise suitable articles and extract and synthesize relevant information including at least two reviewers at each stage of the process. Results will be presented in two systematic reviews that will describe (a) how youth PPI has been conducted (Review1) and (b) what impact youth PPI had on the subsequent research and on stakeholders (Review2). To our knowledge, this is the first set of reviews that uses a critical appraisal tool, which is co-developed with children and young people. Findings from this project will provide valuable insights and set out the key steps to adopting adequate PPI methods when involving children and young people in mental health research.
Private Profile
added a research item
Background: Personality disorders (PDs) are a severe health issue already prevalent among adolescents and young adults. Early detection and intervention offer the opportunity to reduce disease burden and chronicity of symptoms and to enhance long-term functional outcomes. While psychological treatments for PDs have been shown to be effective for young people, the mediators and specific change mechanisms of treatment are still unclear. Aim: As part of the “European Network of Individualized Psychotherapy Treatment of Young People with Mental Disorders” (TREATme), funded by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST), we will conduct a systematic review to summarize the existing knowledge on mediators of treatment outcome and theories of change in psychotherapy for young people with personality disorders. In particular, we will evaluate whether mediators appear to be common or specific to particular age groups, treatment models, or outcome domains (e.g., psychosocial functioning, life quality, and adverse treatment effects). Method: We will follow the reporting guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement recommendations. Electronic databases (PubMed and PsycINFO) have been systematically searched for prospective, longitudinal, and case–control designs of psychological treatment studies, which examine mediators published in English. Participants will be young people between 10 and 30 years of age who suffer from subclinical personality symptoms or have a personality disorder diagnosis and receive an intervention that aims at preventing, ameliorating, and/or treating psychological problems. Results: The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and at conference presentations and will be shared with relevant stakeholder groups. The data set will be made available to other research groups following recommendations of the open science initiative. Databases with the systematic search will be made openly available following open science initiatives. The review has been registered in PROSPERO (evaluation is pending, registration number ID 248959). Implications: This review will deliver a comprehensive overview on the empirical basis to contribute to the further development of psychological treatments for young people with personality disorders.
Private Profile
added a research item
Background: Personality disorders (PDs) are a severe health issue already prevalent among adolescents and young adults. Early detection and intervention offer the opportunity to reduce disease burden and chronicity of symptoms and to enhance long-term functional outcomes. While psychological treatments for personality disorders have been shown to be effective for young people, the mediators and specific change mechanisms of treatment are still unclear. Aim: As part of the “European Network of Individualized Psychotherapy Treatment of Young People with Mental Disorders” (TREATme), funded by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST), we will conduct a systematic review to summarize the existing knowledge on mediators of treatment outcome and theories of change in psychotherapy for young people with personality disorders. In particular, we will evaluate whether mediators appear to be common or specific to particular age groups, treatment models, or outcome domains (e.g., psychosocial functioning, life quality, adverse treatment effects). Method: We will follow the reporting guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement recommendations. Electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO) have been systematically searched for prospective, longitudinal, and case–control designs of psychological treatment studies which examine mediators published in English. Participants will be young people between 10 and 30 years of age who suffer from subclinical personality symptoms or have a personality disorder diagnosis and receive an intervention that aims at preventing, ameliorating and/or treating psychological problems. Results: The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and at conference presentations and will be shared with relevant stakeholder groups. The data set will be made available to other research groups following recommendations of the open science initiative. Databases with the systematic search will be made openly available following open science initiatives. The review has been registered in PROSPERO (evaluation is pending, registration number ID 248959).Implications: This review will deliver a comprehensive overview on the empirical basis to contribute to the further development of psychological treatments for young people with personality disorders.
Vera Gergov
added a research item
Background Adolescence and young adulthood is a risk period for the emergence of mental disorders. There is strong evidence that psychotherapeutic interventions are effective for most mental disorders. However, very little is known about which of the different psychotherapeutic treatment modalities are effective for whom. This large systematic review aims to address this critical gap within the literature on non-specific predictors and moderators of the outcomes of psychotherapeutic interventions among adolescents and young adults with mental disorders. Methods The protocol is being reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) Statement. PubMed and PsycINFO databases will be searched for randomized controlled and quasi-experimental/naturalistic clinical trials. Risk of bias of all included studies will be assessed by the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. The quality of predictor and moderator variables will be also assessed. A narrative synthesis will be conducted for all included studies. Discussion This systematic review will strengthen the evidence base on effective mental health interventions for young people, being the first to explore predictors and moderators of outcome of psychotherapeutic interventions for a wide range of mental disorders in young people. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42020166756 .
Jose M. Mestre
added a research item
Introduction: Anxiety and depressive disorders are a significant problem that starts in childhood or adolescence and should be addressed early to avoid chronic mental conditions. There is strong evidence to demonstrate that psychological treatments are effective for these disorders, however, little is known on mediators and mechanisms of change of psychological treatment in adolescents and young adults. Understanding the pathways through which psychological treatments operate will facilitate more effective treatments. Aim: We aim to conduct a systematic review, exploring the available evidence on mediators of psychological treatments for anxiety and depression in adolescents and young adults. Methods: A systematic search has been performed on PubMed and PsycINFO databases to identify studies from inception to 23rd February 2020. Eligible studies include randomized controlled trials and trials (quasi-experimental) designs that have enrolled adolescents and young adults presenting with depression and/or anxiety and that have examined mediators of psychological treatments. A group of 20 reviewers from the COST-Action TREATme (CA16102) divided into 10 pairs independently screen studies for inclusion, extract information from the included studies, and assess the methodological quality of the included studies and the requirements for mediators. The methodological quality will be assessed by The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Extracted data from the included studies will be collected and presented using a narrative approach. Discussion: This systematic review will summarize and provide a comprehensive overview of the current evidence on mediators of psychological treatments for anxiety and depression for adolescents and young adults. Results will allow the identification of strategies to optimize intervention to enhance clinical outcomes. Ethics and dissemination: Ethics approval is not required. Findings from this systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated at conferences and meetings. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42021234641.
Sibel Halfon
added an update
Conference Paper accepted for presentation at the Society for Psychotherapy Research, 52ndAnnual International Conference
 
Giada Pietrabissa
added a research item
Depression has been widely studied by researchers from different fields, but its causes, and mechanism of action are still not clear. A difficulty emerges from the shifting from objective diagnosis or analysis to explore the subjective feelings and experiences that influence the individuals' expression, communication, and coping in facing depression. The integration of the experiential dimension of the first-person in studies on depression and related methodological recommendations are needed to improve the validity and generalizability of research findings. It will allow the development of timely and effective actions of care. Starting from providing a summary of the literature on theoretical assumptions and considerations for the study of the mind, with particular attention to the experiential dimension of patients with depression (aim #1 and #2), this contribution is aimed to provide practical suggestions for the design of research able to incorporate first-and third-person accounts (aim #3). It is also aimed to review qualified phenomenological methods for the acquisition and interpretation of experiential data in patients with depression (aim #4). Recognizing the first-person perspective in the study of depression is a major step toward a better understanding and treatment of this disorder. Theoretical constructs and technique suggestions that result from this review offer a valid starting point for the inclusion of the experiential dimension to common third-person research in the study of the mind.
Giada Pietrabissa
added a research item
Objective: Symptom improvement is often examined as an indicator of a good outcome of accessing mental health services. However, there is little evidence of whether symptom improvement is associated with other indicators of a good outcome, such as a mutual agreement to end treatment. The aim of this study was to examine whether young people accessing mental health services who meaningfully improved were more likely to mutually agree to end treatment. Methods: Multilevel multinomial regression analysis controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and referral source was conducted on N = 8,995 episodes of care [Female = 5,469, 61%; mean Age = 13.66 (SD = 2.87) years] using anonymised administrative data from young people's mental health services. Results: Compared to young people with no change in mental health difficulties, those showing positive meaningful changes in mental health difficulties were less likely to have case closure due to non-mutual agreement (Odds Ratio or OR = 0.58, 95% Confidence Interval or CI = 0.50–0.61). Similarly, they were less likely to transfer (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.49–0.74) or end treatment for other reasons (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.50–0.70) than by case closure due to mutual agreement. Conclusion: The findings suggest that young people accessing mental health services whose symptoms meaningfully improve are more likely to mutually agree to end treatment, adding to the evidence that symptom improvement may be appropriate to examine as an indicator of a good outcome of accessing mental health services.
Giada Pietrabissa
added a research item
Adolescence is a complex developmental phase, made more complex by obesity and the social isolation imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The literature related to the impact of social isolation on obesity self-management in adolescents is scant and inconsistent. This paper describes the phenomenon from the perspectives of a sample of adolescents with obesity enrolled in an inpa-tients' multidisciplinary rehabilitation program for weight-loss and their caregivers, and its impact on different life domains. Individual semi-structured ad hoc interviews were conducted with 10 adolescent-caregiver dyads, and narratives were qualitatively investigated using an interpretative phenomenology approach to data. Twenty participants took part in the study. The major themes that emerged from this study fall into five basic categories: (1) COVID-19 as an opportunity to reconsider what makes a good life; (2) Persistence in life; (3) Empowering relationship; (4) Daily routine in quarantine; (5) Lives on hold. Understandings drawn from this study may assist health care professionals in providing holistic support, and guidance to adolescents with weight-related issues and their caregivers who experience social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Erkki Heinonen
added a research item
INTRODUCTION Approximately 75% of mental disorders emerge before the age of 25 years but less than half receive appropriate treatment. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic change of adolescents in psychotherapy. The ‘European Network of Individualised Psychotherapy Treatment of Young People with Mental Disorders’, funded by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology, will conduct the first systematic review to summarise the existing knowledge on mediators and theories of change in psychotherapy for adolescents. METHOD A systematic review will be conducted, conforming to the reporting guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement recommendations. Electronic databases (PubMed and PsycINFO) have been systematically searched on 23 February 2020, for prospective, longitudinal and case-control designs which examine mediators of change. Participants will be adolescents between 10 and 19 years of age who suffer from a mental disorder or psychological difficulties and receive an intervention that aims at preventing, ameliorating and/or treating psychological problems. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION Ethical approval is not required for this systematic review as no primary data will be collected. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations and will be shared with stakeholder groups. The whole data set will be offered to other research groups following recommendations of the open science initiative. Databases with the systematic search will be made openly available following open science initiatives.
Giada Pietrabissa
added a research item
Abstract: Eating and weight disorders often develop early in life and cause a long-standing significant health burden. Given the documented role of emotional intelligence (EI) in shaping the body image and predicting the onset of eating disorders, knowledge of the mechanisms involved in EI among youth is fundamental to designing specific interventions for screening and prevention of obesity and eating disorders (EDs). The present systematic mapping review was aimed to explore and quantify the nature and distribution of existing research investigating the impact of EI on EDs in young people. A systematic search for relevant articles was conducted using PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases. The Appraisal tool for Cross-Sectional Studies (AXIS) was used to assess the included studies’ methodological quality. The included studies’ results were mapped based on stratification by age groups (children, preadolescents, and adolescents), population (clinical vs. non-clinical) and disordered eating outcomes. Nine studies were included, supporting the association between EI and body image dissatisfaction, ED risk and bulimic symptomatology, but not with anorexic symptoms. Research on children and clinical populations was scant. Further studies are needed to deepen the role of EI in the genesis and maintenance of EDs.
Giada Pietrabissa
added a research item
BACKGROUND There is a high prevalence of children and young people (CYP) experiencing mental health (MH) problems. Due to the accessibility, affordability and scalability, an increasing number of digital interventions (DIs) have been developed and are being incorporated into MH treatment for CYP. Studies show DI’s potential for improving MH outcomes in randomised controlled trials. However, approaches used to engage CYP in digital MH interventions may differ, with implications for the extent to which findings pertain to the implementation and level of engagement with the DI. Knowledge of the approaches used to engage CYP could aid in the development of interventions that are acceptable and feasible. OBJECTIVE This review aimed to 1) identify types of approaches used in CYP digital MH interventions, 2) explore influencing factors to usage and implementation and 3) investigate ways in which the interventions have been evaluated and whether CYP engages in DI research. METHODS A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases using three key concepts “child and adolescent mental health”, “digital intervention” and “engagement”. Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed utilising rigorous inclusion criteria and screened by at least two reviewers. The selected articles were quality assessed using the mixed methods appraisal tool (MMAT) and data were extracted to address the review aims. Data aggregation and synthesis was conducted and presented as descriptive numerical summaries and narrative synthesis. RESULTS This study identified six approaches from 83 articles and 71 interventions for engaging CYP: websites, games and computer-assisted programs, apps, robots and digital devices, virtual reality, and mobile text messaging. Two themes emerged highlighting “intervention-specific” and “person-specific” barriers and facilitators to CYP’s engagement. These themes encompass factors such as suitability, usability and acceptability of the DIs and motivation, capability and opportunity for the CYP using DIs. The literature highlighted that CYP had a preference for DIs with features such as videos, limited text, ability to personalise or create a profile, ability to connect with others and options to receive text message reminders. The findings of this review suggest a high average retention rate of 79% across the various digital approaches. CONCLUSIONS The development of DIs are on the increase and may be of interest to CYP, particularly in the area of MH treatment. With continuous technological advancements, it is important to know which approaches increase engagement and help CYP facing MH problems. This review identified the existing approaches and highlighted influencing factors from the perspective of CYP. This knowledge provides information that can be used to design and evaluate new interventions. Additionally, identified factors provide important theoretical insights into how and why CYP engage in DIs. CLINICALTRIAL International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) CRD42018094815
Vera Gergov
added a research item
Background: Adolescence and young adulthood is a risk period for the emergence of mental disorders. There is strong evidence that psychotherapeutic interventions are effective for most mental disorders. However, very little is known about for whom different psychotherapeutic treatment modalities are effective. This large systematic review aims to address this critical gap within the literature on non-specific predictors and moderators of the outcomes of psychotherapeutic interventions among young people with mental disorders. Methods: Pubmed and PsycINFO databases were searched for randomized controlled and quasi-experimental/naturalistic clinical trials. Studies were selected according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Risk of bias of all included studies will be assessed by RoB1 and ROBINS-I risk of bias tools. The quality of predictor and moderator variables will be also assessed. A narrative synthesis will be conducted for all included studies. Discussion: This systematic review will strengthen the evidence base on effective mental health interventions for young people, being the first to explore predictors and moderators of outcome of psychotherapeutic interventions for a wide range of mental disorders in young people. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO (CRD42020166756)
Randi Ulberg
added a research item
Background: There is a high prevalence of children and young people (CYP) experiencing mental health (MH) problems. Owing to accessibility, affordability, and scalability, an increasing number of digital health interventions (DHIs) have been developed and incorporated into MH treatment. Studies have shown the potential of DHIs to improve MH outcomes. However, the modes of delivery used to engage CYP in digital MH interventions may differ, with implications for the extent to which findings pertain to the level of engagement with the DHI. Knowledge of the various modalities could aid in the development of interventions that are acceptable and feasible. Objective: This review aimed to (1) identify modes of delivery used in CYP digital MH interventions, (2) explore influencing factors to usage and implementation, and (3) investigate ways in which the interventions have been evaluated and whether CYP engage in DHIs. Methods: A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), and PsycINFO databases using 3 key concepts "child and adolescent mental health," "digital intervention," and "engagement." Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed using rigorous inclusion criteria and screening by at least two reviewers. The selected articles were assessed for quality using the mixed methods appraisal tool, and data were extracted to address the review aims. Data aggregation and synthesis were conducted and presented as descriptive numerical summaries and a narrative synthesis, respectively. Results: This study identified 6 modes of delivery from 83 articles and 71 interventions for engaging CYP: (1) websites, (2) games and computer-assisted programs, (3) apps, (4) robots and digital devices, (5) virtual reality, and (6) mobile text messaging. Overall, 2 themes emerged highlighting intervention-specific and person-specific barriers and facilitators to CYP's engagement. These themes encompassed factors such as suitability, usability, and acceptability of the DHIs and motivation, capability, and opportunity for the CYP using DHIs. The literature highlighted that CYP prefer DHIs with features such as videos, limited text, ability to personalize, ability to connect with others, and options to receive text message reminders. The findings of this review suggest a high average retention rate of 79% in studies involving various DHIs. Conclusions: The development of DHIs is increasing and may be of interest to CYP, particularly in the area of MH treatment. With continuous technological advancements, it is important to know which modalities may increase engagement and help CYP who are facing MH problems. This review identified the existing modalities and highlighted the influencing factors from the perspective of CYP. This knowledge provides information that can be used to design and evaluate new interventions and offers important theoretical insights into how and why CYP engage in DHIs.
Vera Gergov
added 5 research items
Panel title: Biomarkers and Environment - Moderators and treatment effects in psychotherapy with young psychotic patients
Panel title: TREATme: From a systematic review on evidence-based psychotherapeutic interventions for young people to identifying the moderators of the outcome
Vera Gergov
added a project goal
The main aim of the COST Action TREATme funded by European Comission is to establish a sustainable European multidisciplinary researcher network focusing on individualized psychotherapy for young people with mental disorders. 30 European countries are represented in the TREATme.
The Action reviews the state of the art and identifies putative specific markers and mechanisms of change in different psychotherapy modalities, as well as suitable psychotherapy process and treatment measures, and study designs.
The network promotes collaborative funding applications and meets societal challenges connected to mental health. TREATme paves the way for the matching of mental health research to the needs of young people in Europe.
For more information please visit: https://www.treat-me.eu/