Project

Ethics of Climate Change

Goal: To provide a plausible climate ethics theory that is sensitive to the impact of climate change on cultural heritage.

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Abiodun Paul Afolabi
added a research item
Africa's vulnerability to climate change suggests an urgent need to finance adaptation activities. In recent times, very little financing for adaptation has been directed toward the region. Scholars have highlighted the problem of vested interests as the bane of global climate politics but not sufficiently addressed in the area of climate finance. Despite the promise of climate finance contribution by developed countries in the 2015 Paris Agreement, Africa has received only a small proportion of climate finance to date. In a normative manner, the paper addresses the contribution of climate finance to Africa and argues that the idea of duty as an entitlement is too weak to drive a climate finance responsibility that is swamped in the developed countries’ vested interests. Rather, the paper suggests another idea of duty – empathetic duty. This notion of duty suggests that developed countries, nations must possess the capacity to see themselves and the other nations in relation and as cohabitants of the common world with a past, present, and future that intersects. This idea of duty is consistent with the notion of Personhood in Africa, where a sense of duty requires one to take the initiative in matters where the balance of the community is under threat, without seeking one's interest or waiting for the external agents' prompting. It concludes that if this idea of empathetic duty becomes the norm, the problem of vested interests and having to prove causation or pursue climate responsibilities through legal means evaporates.
Abiodun Paul Afolabi
added an update
Climate Future Workshop Draft Paper on "Wading through Vested Interest for a Just Global Climate finance and Policy"
 
Abiodun Paul Afolabi
added an update
Accessing, understanding, and interpreting data and information on climate change is a necessary first step to addressing the devastating impacts of climate change worldwide. Recent observers have suggested that the vulnerability of populations in Africa to weather and climate variability is typically much higher than other continents. However, it is within the continent of Africa that climate information is lacking the most. Scholars have raised some genuine challenges like finance and spatial representation that have contributed to the difficulty in accessing climate data from Africa. These challenges have made the prediction of climate change for many African regions, particularly complex.
This research raises a different possible challenge to the lack of climate data in Africa. The paper analyses climate information generated by some global, regional and national stakeholders. From these accounts, It argues that, rather than seeing a lack of accessibility to climate information as the main challenge to climate data management in Africa, vested interest is a thornier problem affecting Africa's climate data access.
 
Abiodun Paul Afolabi
added a project goal
To provide a plausible climate ethics theory that is sensitive to the impact of climate change on cultural heritage.