Project

Entomological survey in the botanical garden Jean Massart (Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium)

Goal: The survey is realized during an “Objective 1000” network project aiming to inventory the insect fauna of the botanical garden and to record at least 1000 insect and spider species on the site. The specimens are collected using various collecting techniques : beating shrubs and low tree branches, sweeping the plant and herbaceous layer, debarking in winter time, malaise traps, yellow pans, UV-light trap and hanged pheromone interception traps

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Project log

Arnaud Henrard
added a research item
An overall entomological inventory of the Jean Massart botanical garden was performed in the period 2013-2021. In the frame of this project, supported by "Bruxelles Environnement / Leefmilieu Brussel", the arachnofauna diversity was also studied. This article presents the results of research on the spiders (Araneae), harvestmen (Opiliones), and pseudoscorpions (Pseudoscorpiones) found on this site. A total of 239 species were recorded: 222 spiders, 11 harvestmen and 6 pseudoscorpions. Species lists for all these groups are provided, and some "remarkable" species are briefly discussed. One species of Pseudoscorpiones, Lamprochernes chyzeri (Tömösváry, 1883), is new to the Belgian fauna.
Alain Drumont
added an update
The Botanic Garden Jean Massart is a tiny 4.5 ha site, squeezed in between the eastern border of the city of Brussels and the Sonian forest. The Garden is a Natura 2000 site with around 2,000 plant species. The area is composed of various biotopes such as humid areas with a swamp and ponds, an old orchard on dry grassland, a medicinal plants garden, an arboretum and an evolution garden, mixed with patches of semi natural woods.
The initial ‘Objective 1000 @JardinMassart’ project goal was to inventory at least 1,000 species of insects & spiders during a one year time span. In 2016, 36 citizen scientists and professional scientists started the project and 1,200 species were recorded. This success led to the continuation of the project. In the following years, 65 collaborators, mainly citizen scientists with a huge knowledge of entomology, worked together with scientists to beat the initial project goal and more than 4,000 species (4,003) were inventoried by the end of 2021. E.g. beetles: 1,370 species or 30% of the actual known Belgian fauna; spiders: 222 species (30%), but in some families 50% or more of the Belgian species were found e.g. lady birds 51 %.
These results indicate that the Garden has an amazing unexpected high diversity: some very rare species even on a European scale are recorded; nearly 150 species are found for the first time in Belgium and even several species new for science. Hence, the Botanic Garden Jean Massart becomes a reference site for the insects and spiders in Belgium.
Its reference collection is conserved at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels as well as the database of the records. Publications on the fauna are open access and available on https://www.researchgate.net/project/Entomological-survey-in-the-botanical-garden-Jean-Massart-Brussels-Capital-Region-Belgium#projectLog, while many observations are available on https://observations.be/locations/72818/
 
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The Botanic Garden Jean Massart is a tiny 4.5 ha site, squeezed in between the eastern border of the city of Brussels and the Sonian forest. The Garden is a Natura 2000 site with around 2,000 plant species. The area is composed of various biotopes such as humid areas with a swamp and ponds, an old orchard on dry grassland, a medicinal plants garden, an arboretum and an evolution garden, mixed with patches of semi natural woods. The initial ‘Objective 1000 @JardinMassart’ project goal was to inventory at least 1,000 species of insects & spiders during a one year time span. In 2016, 36 citizen scientists and professional scientists started the project and 1,200 species were recorded. This success led to the continuation of the project. In the following years, 65 collaborators, mainly citizen scientists with a huge knowledge of entomology, worked together with scientists to beat the initial project goal and more than 4,000 species (4,003) were inventoried by the end of 2021. E.g. beetles: 1,370 species or 30% of the actual known Belgian fauna; spiders: 222 species (30%), but in some families 50% or more of the Belgian species were found e.g. lady birds 51 %. These results indicate that the Garden has an amazing unexpected high diversity: some very rare species even on a European scale are recorded; nearly 150 species are found for the first time in Belgium and even several species new for science. Hence, the Botanic Garden Jean Massart becomes a reference site for the insects and spiders in Belgium. Its reference collection is conserved at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels as well as the database of the records. Publications on the fauna are open access and available on https://www.researchgate.net/project/Entomological-survey-in-the-botanical-garden-Jean-Massart-Brussels-Capital-Region-Belgium#projectLog, while many observations are available on https://observations.be/locations/72818/
Alain Drumont
added an update
During a project supported by Brussels Environment, the entomofauna of the Botanical Garden Jean Massart was studied in the period 2015-2021. A paper discussing the results of the research on the moths (Lepidoptera) on this site was just published. A total of 501 species was recorded. Some notable species are briefly discussed.
 
Alain Drumont
added a research item
During a project supported by Brussels Environment, the entomofauna of the Botanical Garden Jean Massart was studied in the period 2015-2021. This article discusses the results of the research on the moths (Lepidoptera) on this site. A total of 501 species was recorded. Some notable species are briefly discussed.
Arnaud Henrard
added a research item
Since the first record, in 2006, of Saitis barbipes (Simon, 1868) in Belgium, numerous observations were accumulated in various naturalist observation platforms such as Waarnemingen.be. This note intends to update the status of Saitis barbipes to "established" in Belgium. A brief description is provided and detailed illustrations of specimens collected in the Jean Massart Botanical Garden (Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium) are presented. Its distribution in Belgium and surroundings is also discussed.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Staphylinidae beetles belonging to the genus Euplectus Leach, 1817 were obtained during inventories of the insect fauna present in the Jean Massart botanical garden (Brussels-Capital region) and in the Claire-Fontaine nature reserve (Hainaut province). The results of the identification of this material allowed the census of 5 species for which collection data are provided. Among these, E. bonvouloiri narentinus Reitter, 1882 and E. duponti Aubé, 1833 are included here for the first time in the Belgian fauna.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
During biological inventories carried out with intensity and pugnacity in two protected Belgian sites, the national nature reserve of Claire-Fontaine (Province of Hainaut) and the botanical garden Jean Massart (Region of Brussels-Capital, Auderghem), three species of Alticinae were recorded for the first time in Belgium: Phyllotreta astrachanica Lopatin, 1977, Phyllotreta rugifrons Kuester, 1849 and Longitarsus kutscherai (Rye, 1872). The discovery of these three species is commented on and illustrated in photos.
Alain Drumont
added an update
The initial ‘Objective 1000 @JardinMassart’ project goal was to inventory at least 1,000 species of insects & spiders during a one year time span. In 2016, 36 citizen scientists and professional scientists started the project and 1,200 species were recorded. This success led to the continuation of the project. In the following years, 65 collaborators, mainly citizen scientists with a huge knowledge of entomology, worked together with scientists to beat the initial project goal and more than 3,000 species (3,417) were inventoried by the end of 2021. E.g. beetles: 1,303 species or 30% of the actual known Belgian fauna; spiders: 214 species (30%), but in some families 50% or more of the Belgian species were found e.g. lady birds 51 %. (see presentation of October 2021, available on ResearchGate : DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.21457.25442).
 
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The Botanic Garden Jean Massart is a tiny 4.5 ha site, squeezed in between the eastern border of the city of Brussels and the Sonian forest. The Garden is a Natura 2000 site with around 2.000 plant species. The area is composed of various biotopes such as humid areas with a swamp and ponds, an old orchard on dry grassland, a medicinal plants garden, an arboretum and an evolution garden, mixed with patches of semi natural woods. The initial ‘Objective 1000 @JardinMassart’ project goal was to inventory at least 1,000 species of insects & spiders during a one year time span. In 2016, 36 citizen scientists and professional scientists started the project and 1,200 species were recorded. This success led to the continuation of the project. In the following years, 65 collaborators, mainly citizen scientists with a huge knowledge of entomology, worked together with scientists to beat the initial project goal and more than 3,000 species (3,417) were inventoried by the end of 2021. E.g. beetles: 1,303 species or 30% of the actual known Belgian fauna; spiders: 214 species (30%), but in some families 50% or more of the Belgian species were found e.g. lady birds 51 %. These results indicate that the Garden has an amazing unexpected high diversity: some very rare species even on a European scale are recorded, more than 70 species are found for the first time in Belgium and even a new species for science. Hence, the Botanic Garden Jean Massart becomes a reference site for the insects and spiders in Belgium. Its reference collection is conserved at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels as well as the database of the records
Alain Drumont
added an update
We have just exceeded the figure of 1,300 species of Coleoptera found in the Jean Massart botanical garden, of which the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS) is carrying out an inventory of arthropods since 2013. This number corresponds to a little less than 30% of the beetles Belgian fauna occuring on a peri-urban site of only 5 hectares located near Brussels !!!!!
 
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The occurrence of Bruchidius imbricornis (Panzer, 1795), Bruchus occidentalis Lukjanovitch & Ter-Minassian, 1957 and Bruchus brachialis Fåhraeus, 1839 is documented for the first time from Belgium. Bruchidius siliquastri Delobel, 2007, previously known only from the Brussels region, is confirmed by several additional localities and is also recorded here from Flanders and Walloon region. Cercis canadensis L. (Fabaceae) is also recorded for the first time as host plant for B. siliquastri. So far, the Belgian fauna includes 19 well established species of Bruchinae (native and naturalized).
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Following the capture of two specimens of Opilo mollis (Linnaeus, 1758) in 2017 and 2019 at Oudergem (Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium), the first author decided to gather all information about the presence of this species in the Benelux countries. This beetle lives under the bark of decaying stems and branches of deciduous trees which are colonized by bark beetles. Everywhere it is very rare. The distribution map shows that it is unknown in some regions of Benelux.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The “Jardin botanique Jean Massart” is a 5 ha botanical garden located in the site “Rouge Cloître”, on the border of the Sonian Forest in Auderghem, Brussels-Capital Region. Created by Jean Massart in 1922, the botanical garden was conceived to represent a number of biotopes in Belgium and it globally remains as such since its creation. It currently includes about 1.000 kinds of plants distributed in several areas and thematic collections such as medicinal and aromatic plants, a collection of cultivated plants, an orchard, an arboretum, an evolutionary garden, a wetland and experimental parcels. The Cerambycidae beetles were sampled during an “Objective 1000” network project aiming to inventory the insect fauna of the botanical garden and to record at least 1000 insect and spider species on the site.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The occurrence of the Asian hornet, Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836, in the Brussels-Capital region and the results of its progression in Belgium until the end of 2019 are presented. A brief biology of the species is recalled. The criteria for distinguishing it from its closest species in Belgium, the European hornet, Vespa crabro Linnaeus, 1758 and the bush wasp, Dolichovespula media (Retz, 1783), are underlined.The four European hornet species are also pictured. An addendum about its discovery in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in september 2020 is provided at the end of the paper.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
A survey of the Botanical Garden Jean Massart situated at the outskirts of the city of Brussels revealed the presence of ten species of the Rhagionidae representing nearly 50% of the species ever recorded in Belgium. Chrysopilus asiliformis (Preyssler, 1791) and Chrysopilus cristatus (Fabricius, 1775) were the most abundant species. Rhagio immaculatus (Meigen, 1804), R. notatus (Meigen, 1820) and R. tringarius (Linnaeus, 1758) were represented by singletons only. Remarkable is the record of the very rare Archicera avarorum Szilády, 1934, known before from only 3 females from Central Europe. The antennae, feeding apparatus and female terminalia are illustrated. The broadly flattened flagellomere distinguishes it from Spania nigra Meigen, 1830, but the systematic position or possible synonymy of Archicera with the genus Spania is not discussed. The records of Ptiolina obscura (Fallén, 1814) the Black-fringed Moss-snipefly, also a very rare species in Europe, are also remarkable. The male terminalia of P. obscura are illustrated for the first time and a key is provided for the western European species of Ptiolina.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
In the Botanic Garden Jean Massart at Oudergem, a specimen of Rhizophagus fenestralis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Monotomidae) was found between 18.vi and 1.vii.2019. This little beetle is new for the Brussels Capital Region. After the first Belgian capture at Dinant in 1955, and 6 other captures between 1964 and 1993 in the surrounding of Liège, R. fenestralis became more common in the Benelux countries from the turn of the century. At the moment it is present in 5 Belgian and in 3 Dutch provinces. It lives in broadleaved forests under the bark of decaying trees wich are affected by bark beetles (Scolytinae). In Europe it is dispersed from Portugal to Russia, but everywhere it continues to be a rarity.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The presence in Belgium of the weevil beetle Ferreria marqueti (Aubé, 1863) (Curculionidae) is treated and confirmed on the basis of several collected samples realized in the botanical garden Jean Massart, Brussels-Capital Region, and in the vicinity of the village of Nethen, Walloon Region. The data related to these collections as well as previous records in Belgium are presented and discussed.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
On 13.v.2019 a female of Isorhipis melasoides (Laporte de Castelnau, 1835) was caught in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart at Oudergem (Brussels Capital Region). This eucnemid species was discovered in Belgium for the first time in 2010. Until now, it has only been encountered in three localities. I. melasoides occurs in Europe, mainly in old beech forests, but it is never common. Apparently, it is slowly expanding its distribution area.
Wouter Dekoninck
added a research item
Since its description based on a single alate gyne by the German entomologist Arnold Förster, Lasius bicornis (Förster, 1850), previously known as Formica bicornis, has been sporadically observed in the Eurasian region and consequently been characterized as very rare. Here, we present the Belgian situation and we consider some explanations for the status of this species.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
In June 2015, a specimen of Anidorus sanguinolentus (Kiesenwetter, 1861) was found in Anderlecht (Brussels Capital Region) in a light trap. This was the first discovery of this beetle species in Belgium. In the spring of 2019, onother four specimens were collected in our country: the first in March in a nature reserve in Gouy-lez-Piéton (province of Hainaut); the second in April in a botanical garden in Auderghem (Brussels Capital Region); the third in May and the fourth in June, both also in Auderghem. It is surprising to find that the three sites are so far apart. A. sanguinolentus is a beetle from Southern Europe. It may have started a silent advance towards Central Europe. In April 2016 and May 2019, this species was also for the first time discovered in the French Alsace.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The presentation is focused on the resulats obtained for the entomological survey that takes place in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart located in Auderghem, in Brussels -Capital region. The inventory used various insect trappings and most of the specimens collected are mounted. Later, the exemplars are identified by a college of 57 citizen scientists and researchers that belongs to 10 european countries. Their accurate determinations provide a list of more than 3.000 arthropods species for this unique small site of 4.5 hectares, and also constitute a remarkable reference collection for Belgium that will be housed in the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences. This result is unexpectly higher than the initial projet Objective 1000 which has the goal to collect 1.000 species of insects and spiders in this botanical garden. The beeltes are mostly represented by nearly 1.200 species recorded with some very rare ones shown.The scientific results of this inventory are also presented as well as the future of the project.
Pierre-Nicolas Libert
added a research item
Two Ichneumonidae species are recorded for the first time in Belgium: Diacritus aciculatus (van Vollenhoven, 1878) and Phrudus monilicornis Bridgman, 1886. Their subfamilies, respectively Diacritinae and Phrudinae, are also newly recorded from Belgium. A first distribution map is presented for Diacritus aciculatus (van Vollenhoven, 1878). The presence of Brachycyrtus ornatus Kriechbaumer, 1880 (Brachycyrtinae) is confirmed in our land.
Patrick Grootaert
added 2 research items
Drapetis bruscellensis sp. nov. is described from the botanical garden Jean Massart situated at the border of the Sonian forest in Brussels. Its identity has been confirmed both morphologically and genetically by the study of the closely related species D. pusilla Loew, 1859 and D. parilis Collin, 1926. The terminalia of all three species have been illustrated and COI barcodes are provided for five of the eight species known from Belgium: D. assimilis Fallén 1815, D. bruscellensis sp. nov., D. exilis Meigen, 1822, D. parilis and D. pusilla. In addition the male terminalia from D. subparilis Raffone, 2013 recently described from Tuscany (Italy) are illustrated as well. It is shown that D. subparilis is not closely related to the above mentioned species.
The species diversity of five fungus gnats’ families (Diptera: Sciaroidea: Diadocidiidae, Ditomyiidae, Bolitophilidae, Keroplatidae, Mycetophilidae) are studied, based on material collected in the botanical garden Jean Massart on Brussels outskirts (Auderghem). The collecting was carried out by two Townes type Malaise traps during one year from May 2015 to May 2016. Altogether 2,270 specimens were collected belonging to 148 species. Fifty-two species and five genera were recorded from Belgium for the first time. The general distribution and systematics of these new species have been briefly discussed. A list of the species including complete account of collected material, is provided. Fungus gnats were observed to be active all year around with more species diverse periods in May-June and October. A considerably large and remarkably coloured species, Greenomyia mongolica, is discussed to have a possibly invasive character of distribution in Europe. A set of photographs illustrating representatives of all recorded 46 fungus gnats genera has been included.
Alain Drumont
added 2 research items
The invasive bark-beetle species Phloeosinus rudis Blandford, 1894 was collected for the first time in Belgium during an entomological inventory in the Jean Massart botanical garden located in Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region). Adults emerged in abundance by keeping in the laboratory a single trunk of Cupressus sempervirens L. found dead in the garden. P. rudis emerged concurrently with P. thuyae (Perris, 1855) that was known from Belgium. Then, checking collections from citizen scientists revealed, however, that P. rudis was already present in the country (province of Hainaut) as well. As a result, the belgian fauna comprises now three species belonging to the genus Phloeosinus Chapuis, 1869.
Two specimens of Euglenes oculatus Paykull, 1798 were collected in July 2015 and in June 2016 in the botanical garden Jean Massart in Audergem (Brussels Capital Region). The authors then decided to accumulate all information about this rare beetle belonging to the family of Aderidae. So far, the species seems to be almost unknown in the Benelux countries. However, our study proves that it is currently present in Belgium and in The Netherlands. Data from collections, pictures of specimens and a distribution map are given.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Between 1970 and 2016, 39 cerambycid species were found at the westside of Brussels-Capital Region. Since then, 4 new species were captured: Alosterna tabacicolor (De Geer, 1775), Callidium violaceum (Linnaeus, 1758), Leiopus nebulosus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Saperda scalaris (Linnaeus, 1758). These discoveries could be the result of a more friendly management in order to enhance biodiversity in wooded areas. In this paper, some attention is paid to several captures in the Botanic Garden Jean Massart at Oudergem during the period 2013 till 2018. An illustrated enumeration of the 4 species is given, amplified by details about their discovery and some characteristics.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Alain Drumont
added a research item
We present the first capture in Belgium of the bark beetle species Pityokteines vorontzowi (Jakobson, 1896), carried out during a trapping performed in the botanical garden Jean Massart located in Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region).
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The presence in Belgium of the beetle Berginus tamarisci Wollaston, 1854 belonging to the Mycetophagidae family is treated and confirmed on the basis of several collects realized in the Brussels-Capital Region and in the provinces of Liège and Limburg. The data relating to these collections are presented and discussed.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Podagrica fuscicornis (Linnaeus, 1767) is a little flea-beetle, living in Central, South and West Europe, as well as in the Middle East and North Africa. Since a few years it has become more common in the Benelux, South England, North Germany, Denmark and even in the Baltic region. One can find the beetle on Malvaceae, especially in gardens on rose-mallow (Alcea rosea). In the Botanical Garden Jean Massart in Oudergem (Brussels-Capital Region), on 15.vi.2017, a unique color aberration was found with blackish brown head, pronotum, antenna and legs.
Camille Dekuijper
added an update
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Patrick Grootaert
added a research item
Although the Botanic Garden Jean Massart is just a tiny little spot of 5ha, a wedge of the old Sonian forest squeezed into the city of Brussels, it has a very rich fauna with numerous rare species. The order of the flies (Diptera) is probably the largest group of insects in Belgium with an estimated number at least 6,000 species. They thrive in a wide variety of habitats and have numerous niches as pollinators, scavengers, predators, parasites and decomposers. Some examples Fungus gnats (Mycetophilidae) 63 new records for the Belgian fauna paddestoelmuggen / moustiques des champignons Two years of sampling resulted in 160 species being observed which represent more than half of the Belgian fauna.  63 species are first records for the Belgian fauna  several species are only recently described from Europe  there are a few invasive species. All species are barcoded. We have now a genetic reference that confirms morphological identifications. In the future, it will allow just to look at the DNA in the samples to identify the species by the DNA barcodes present. Dance flies and dagger flies (Empididae, Hybotidae; Atelestidae, Microphoridae) At the moment 360 species are known in Belgium. 38 % or 137 species occur in the Botanic Garden Jean Massart. This is a very high number for such a small spot. Meghyperus sudeticus, new for the Belgian fauna and very rare all over Europe. A unique record. Platypalpus negrobovi Grootaert et al. 2012 described from the Russian Caucasus is now recorded also from the Garden. It is a first record for Belgium. Drapetis bruscellensis Grootaert, 2016 a new species for science from the Garden. This tiny fly (2mm) is probably a predator of mites. The differences in form (morphology) with closely related species were confirmed by examination of the DNA. There is a genetic distance of more than 10% with related species.
Loic Dahan
added a research item
From 2015 until 2017 ants were collected during a trapping organised for an entomological survey (Objective 1000, a network project for the inventory of the insect fauna) in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart located in Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region). This Botanical Garden (5 ha, constructed in 1922) borders the Sonian Forest and harbours more than 1500 insect species.
Wouter Dekoninck
added a research item
From 2015 until 2017 ants were collected during a trapping organised for an entomological survey (Objective 1000, a network project for the inventory of the insect fauna) in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart located in Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region). This Botanical Garden (5 ha, and constructed in 1922) borders the Sonian forest and harbours more than 1500 insect species. 21 ant species were collected during the first two years.
Alain Drumont
added 2 research items
Two specimens of Tropideres albirostris (Schaller, 1783) was found in 2015 and 2017 during a trapping organised for an entomological survey in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart located in the Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region). This Anthribidae is currently very localized in Belgium.
On 28.VII.2016 seven specimens of Reesa vespulae (Milliron, 1939) (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) were found in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart in Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region). This little beetle has its origin in North America. Since its discovery in 1939 it extended its area all over the world. The larva feeds on dried vegetable or animal material. In museums this insect can cause damage in zoological, botanical and entomological collections.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Limnephilus ignavus McLachlan, 1865 had not been observed since the forties in Flanders (Brussels-Capital Region included). On 27.X.2016, one male was captured with a light trap in the botanical garden Jean Massart in Auderghem (Brussels-Capital Region), close to the location where also the historical observations took place.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
On 10.VI.2015 and on 28.VII.2016, a specimen of Synchita undata Guérin-Méneville, 1844 (Coleoptera: Zopheridae) was found in the Botanic Garden Jean Massart at Oudergem. On 28.VIII.2016 a third specimen was caught near the Scheutbos park in Anderlecht. This little beetle is new for the Brussels Capital Region. After a single capture in 1878, this species is again recorded in Belgium since 2008 with observations in the provinces Vlaams-Brabant, Limburg, Oost-Vlaanderen and West-Vlaanderen. Synchita undata lives in broadleaved forests under the bark of decaying stems and branches which are affected by brittle cinder (Kretzschmaria deusta). It is dispersed in Central and South Europe. We notice that this area is slowly expanding northwards. Since a few years this insect has also been seen in England, Germany and Alsace (France).
Loic Dahan
added 2 research items
Gnorimus nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) was considered a common species all over Belgium in the beginning of the previous century. However, between 1970 and 2015 in northern Belgium, it was restricted to a single known population, in and near the Sonian forest, near Brussels. In this article we report three new localities for this species discovered in 2015 and 2016, i.e. Osbroek (Aalst), an orchard in Huizingen (Beersel) and the botanical garden Jean Massart (Auderghem). Finally, we discuss whether these observations are likely evidence of local populations and what could be the origin of these populations. Résumé Au début du siècle précédent, Gnorimus nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) était considéré comme une espèce commune dans toute la Belgique. Par contre, entre 1970 et 2015, sa présence dans le nord de la Belgique s'est limitée à une seule population située dans et aux alentours de la forêt de Soignes, près de Bruxelles. Dans cet article, nous rapportons trois nouvelles localités: dans la réserve naturelle Het Osbroek (Aalst), dans un verger à Huizingen (Beersel) et au Jardin Botanique Jean Massart (Auderghem). Enfin, nous tentons de comprendre si ces observations confirment la présence de populations locales et quelle pourrait être, dans ce cas, l'origine de ces populations. Samenvatting Gnorimus nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) werd in het begin van de vorige eeuw beschouwd als een algemene soort in heel België. Maar tussen 1970 en 2015, was de soort in noord België beperkt tot slechts een gekende populatie, in en nabij het Zoniënwoud, nabij Brussel. In dit artikel melden wij drie nieuwe locaties voor deze soort die ontdekt werden in 2015 en 2016, nl. Osbroek (Aalst), een hoogstamboomgaard in Huizingen (Beersel) en de botanische tuin Jean Massart (Auderghem). Tenslotte, bespreken we of deze observaties duidelijk bewijs opleveren van lokale populaties en wat de origine van deze populaties zou kunnen zijn.
The “Jardin botanique Jean Massart” is a 5 ha botanical garden situated on the border of the Sonian Forest in Auderghem, Brussels and it currently includes about 1.000 kinds of plants. During an entomological survey realised from 2013 until 2016 using various collecting techniques, 30 species of Cerambycidae have been recorded for the site. This number represents about 25% of the Belgian Cerambycidae fauna. Among them, the species Tetrops starkii Chevrolat constitutes the first record for the Brussels-Capital Region for this longhorn beetle only previously reported from Wallonia in Belgium in 2012. Another remarkable species is Exocentrus adspersus Mulsant which had not been reported since 1950 from the Brussels-Capital Region. Finally, we also found several specimens of Leiopus femoratus Fairmaire, a species in expansion in Belgium after its discovery in 2006. Some others rare species were recorded too as Arhopalus rusticus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Saperda scalaris (Linnaeus, 1758).
Alain Drumont
added a research item
New Belgian records of Pachyrhinus lethierryi (Desbrochers, 1875) from different provinces and in the Brussels-Capital region allow us to update its distribution in Belgium. A distribution map is presented and is used to visualise the recent expansion of this species. Résumé De nouvelles occurrences de différentes provinces de Belgique et de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale permettent l'actualisation de la répartition de Pachyrhinus lethierryi (Desbrochers, 1875) sur le territoire. Une carte est proposée pour visualiser l'extension récente de l'espèce. Samenvatting Nieuwe waarnemingen vanuit verschillende Belgische provincies en in het Brussels Hoofdstedelijk Gewest stellen ons in staat de verspreiding van Pachyrhinus lethierryi (Desbrochers, 1875) in ons land te actualiseren. Een verspreidingskaart wordt gebruikt om de recente uitbreiding van deze soort te illustreren.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
Since 2007, thirteen new remarkable cerambycid species were found at the westside of Brussels. Furthermore, some attention is paid to several captures in the Botanic Garden Jean Massart at Oudergem during the period 2013 till 2016. An illustrated enumeration is given, amplified by details about their discovery and some characteristics.
Alain Drumont
added a research item
The “Jardin botanique Jean Massart” is a 5 ha botanical garden situated on the border of the Sonian Forest in Auderghem, Brussels and it currently includes about 1.000 kinds of plants. During an entomological survey realised from 2013 until 2016 using various collecting techniques, 30 species of Cerambycidae have been recorded for the site. This number represents about 25% of the Belgian Cerambycidae fauna. Among them, the species Tetrops starkii Chevrolat constitutes the first record for the Brussels-Capital Region for this longhorn beetle only previously reported from Wallonia in Belgium in 2012. Another remarkable species is Exocentrus adspersus Mulsant which had not been reported since 1950 from the Brussels-Capital Region. Finally, we also found several specimens of Leiopus femoratus Fairmaire, a species in expansion in Belgium after its discovery in 2006. Some others rare species were recorded too as Arhopalus rusticus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Saperda scalaris (Linnaeus, 1758).
Alain Drumont
added 2 research items
Populations of the curculionid beetles genus Otiorhynchus Germar, 1822 were monitored in two sites of the Brussels-Capital Region in 2015. Ten species of this genus were thus identified with, among them, the invasive species O. crataegi Germar, 1824 for which the presence and establishment are thus confirmed for Belgium. Otiorhynchus crataegi, O. aurifer Boheman, 1843 and O. singularis (Linnaeus, 1767) are reported for the first time from the Brussels-Capital Region. On the basis of all the observations recorded for our country, a current distribution map for O. crataegi and O. aurifer is established. Ecological data on O. crataegi collected during this research are also presented.
Gnorimus nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) was considered a common species all over Belgium in the beginning of the previous century. However, between 1970 and 2015 in northern Belgium, it was restricted to a single known population, in and near the Sonian forest, near Brussels. In this article we report three new localities for this species discovered in 2015 and 2016, i.e. Osbroek (Aalst), an orchard in Huizingen (Beersel) and the botanical garden Jean Massart (Auderghem). Finally, we discuss whether these observations are likely evidence of local populations and what could be the origin of these populations. Résumé Au début du siècle précédent, Gnorimus nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) était considéré comme une espèce commune dans toute la Belgique. Par contre, entre 1970 et 2015, sa présence dans le nord de la Belgique s'est limitée à une seule population située dans et aux alentours de la forêt de Soignes, près de Bruxelles. Dans cet article, nous rapportons trois nouvelles localités: dans la réserve naturelle Het Osbroek (Aalst), dans un verger à Huizingen (Beersel) et au Jardin Botanique Jean Massart (Auderghem). Enfin, nous tentons de comprendre si ces observations confirment la présence de populations locales et quelle pourrait être, dans ce cas, l'origine de ces populations. Samenvatting Gnorimus nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) werd in het begin van de vorige eeuw beschouwd als een algemene soort in heel België. Maar tussen 1970 en 2015, was de soort in noord België beperkt tot slechts een gekende populatie, in en nabij het Zoniënwoud, nabij Brussel. In dit artikel melden wij drie nieuwe locaties voor deze soort die ontdekt werden in 2015 en 2016, nl. Osbroek (Aalst), een hoogstamboomgaard in Huizingen (Beersel) en de botanische tuin Jean Massart (Auderghem). Tenslotte, bespreken we of deze observaties duidelijk bewijs opleveren van lokale populaties en wat de origine van deze populaties zou kunnen zijn.
Alain Drumont
added a project goal
The survey is realized during an “Objective 1000” network project aiming to inventory the insect fauna of the botanical garden and to record at least 1000 insect and spider species on the site. The specimens are collected using various collecting techniques : beating shrubs and low tree branches, sweeping the plant and herbaceous layer, debarking in winter time, malaise traps, yellow pans, UV-light trap and hanged pheromone interception traps
 
Alain Drumont
added a research item
On 1.VI.2015 a specimen of Pentaphyllus testaceus (Hellwig, 1792) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was found in the Botanical Garden Jean Massart in Auderghem (Brussels Capital Region). This tenebrionid is very rare in Belgium. LIBBRECHT (1988) reported it twice in our country, records are before 1950. From 1992 onward there are again records in the provinces of Antwerp, Brabant, Limburg and Liège. Apparently this beetle is actually expanding. P. testaceus has a wide distribution in Europe, but is nowhere common. Résumé Un spécimen de Pentaphyllus testaceus (Hellwig, 1792) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) a été collecté le 1 er juin 2015 dans le Jardin Botanique Jean Massart situé à Auderghem (Région de Bruxelles-Capitale). Ce ténébrion est très rare en Belgique. LIBBRECHT (1988) ne le signale que deux fois de Belgique, avec des captures datant d'avant 1950. A partir de 1992, de nouvelles données font mention de cette espèce dans les provinces d'Anvers, du Brabant, du Limbourg et de Liège. Apparemment, ce coléoptère serait donc en phase d'expansion. P. testaceus présente une large distribution en Europe, mais n'est nulle part commun.