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Energy Prosumer

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Peter Kaestel
added a research item
This paper analyses the economics of pooling small UK based local electricity prosumers with back-up access to the National Grid and compares it to the current conventional UK electricity supply model—business as usual (BAU) approach. This is contextualized against the UK energy market framework, prosumer research and changing energy market dynamics. For the economic assessment a three-tiered production/supply and consumption model is developed based on site specific levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and other cost parameter to operate the model. Modeling results indicated the economic feasibility and advantage of a prosumer approach in a significant number of modeling scenarios. Additionally, a break-even analysis for the two approach-es was undertaken to understand the sensitivity of individual input parameters. Keywords: Energy-Prosumer, Decentralized Energy, Economics, LCOE
Peter Kaestel
added an update
This paper analyses the economics of pooling small UK based local electricity prosumers with back-up access to the National Grid and compares it to the current conventional UK electricity supply model―business as usual (BAU) approach. This is contextualized against the UK energy market framework, prosumer research and changing energy market dynamics. For the economic assessment a three-tiered production/supply and consumption model is developed based on site specific levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and other cost parameter to operate the model. Modeling results indicated the economic feasibility and advantage of a prosumer approach in a significant number of modeling scenarios. Additionally, a break-even analysis for the two approaches was undertaken to understand the sensitivity of individual input parameters.
 
Peter Kaestel
added a research item
The arrival of small-scale decentralized energy installations coincides with the emergence of so-called " prosumers " —entities/households that are producer and consumer of energy in one. This research focuses on an electricity prosumer model in the context of the UK market. Levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for photovoltaic (PV) and wind energy will be modeled for six UK sites. Additionally, self-consumption levels for two different load profiles and technologies will be estimated per site. The simulations are modeled with HOMER software and multiple inputs will be varied including: natural resource, equipment cost, maintenance cost, equipment life expectancy, cost of capital, project life and load profiles. The modeled self-consumption levels show significant differences and varied between 31% and 72% depending on load profile itself and RE technologies mixes modeled. The pooling of prosumers implied by lower load profile volatility proved to be beneficial to self-consumption levels in the modeled scenarios, up to 17.6%. LCOE showed significant ranges depending on the input parameters and their combination, 10–55 p/kW h for PV and 2–19 p/kW h for wind. The combination of these factors is decisive for the final LCOE and the negative effects of less benign factors can be compensated by other parameters. When compared to current electricity retail prices of around 15 p/kW h around 97% of wind sites and around 4% of PV scenarios implied LCOE reached grid parity. The self-consumption levels and LCOE analysis indicate the viability of electricity prosumer models.
Peter Kaestel
added 2 research items
In an earlier article the Authors modeled levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and self-consumption levels in the UK for “prosumers” – entities/households that are producer and consumer of energy in one. Calculations were focused on wind and photovoltaic (PV) for six UK sites. [Kästel P, Gilroy-Scott B. Economics of pooling small local electricity prosumers – LCOE & self-consumption. 2015] Based on these results the poster presents the summary results of the analysis of the economics of pooling small local electricity prosumers with back-up access to the national grid and compares it to a business as usual (BAU) approach. The economic viability is assessed from a single prosumer point of view. The prosumer-model results are compared to the established electricity supply model . The economic advantage/disadvantage between the two approaches is measured as difference between annual and lifetime cost for a given electricity consumption. Modeling results indicated the economic feasibility of a prosumer approach. The number of variables used and combination thereof explained the range of modeling results. Whilst some variables are determined externally, others can be site and technology dependent or are controlled by the prosumers themselves. It can be concluded that a Prosumer-Approach could offer significant economic opportunities; yet adopting such an approach would necessitate/cause changes to market structures over time.