Project

Emotions, Creativity, and Emotional Creativity: The Link between Cognition and Emotion

Goal: This project aims to explore the various facets of emotional creativity, which is the ability to experience and express original, appropriate, and authentic combinations of emotions. The project started in 2013, when we explored if people who are highly emotionally creative are also more engaged in creative leisure activities such as writing blogs, poems or prose, inventing, performing drama or dance improvisations, composing music, etc. In 2016, the results were published in the Creativity Research Journal (28/3,348-356):

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305745008_Emotional_Creativity_and_Real-Life_Involvement_in_Different_Types_of_Creative_Leisure_Activities

Recently, we have focused our attention on examining the diagnostic potential of the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI, Averill, 1999) for the assessment of cognitive decline in late adulthood. Current research on emotional aging shows that many neurodegenerative diseases can be diagnosed in their early stages using a proper psychological assessment. The results of our initial study conducted on a population of 187 older adults indicate that cognitive decline causes significant changes in emotional creativity:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/332806384_Cognitive_Decline_Influences_Emotional_Creativity_in_the_Elderly
(2019, Creativity Research Journal, 31/1, 93-101)

This project is still ongoing and our team is open to any comments, cooperation, or joint publishing.

Keywords: Emotions, Creativity, Emotional Creativity, Cognitive Dysfunction, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Cognitive Decline, Cognitive Impairments, Mental Deterioration, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Mild Neurocognitive Disorder, Affective Symptoms, Emotional Disturbances, Affect, Feelings, Leisure Activities, Creative Ability, Artistic Creativity, Creative Thinking, Creativeness, Aging, Cognitive Deficits

MeSH Headings: Emotions, Creativity, Cognitive Dysfunction, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Affective Symptoms, Leisure Activities, Affect

Date: 1 January 2013

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Project log

Radek Trnka
added a research item
Previous research has shown that cognitive creativity decreases in older adulthood. However, the impact of age on emotional creativity remains unknown. The main aim of the present study was to explore how emotional creativity differs across adulthood. A total of 407 participants (251 women, 156 men) consisting of older, midlife and younger adults were administrated the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI). A hierarchical multiple regression was used to determine whether emotional creativity differed with age. Age was negatively associated with the ECI total score and two components of the ECI, emotional novelty and emotional preparedness. In contrast, emotional effectiveness/authenticity was constant across adulthood. The results indicate that the tendency to think about one’s emotions and to evaluate them as novel and unique decreases with age, whereas the ability to respond effectively in situations requiring novel emotional responses remains relatively intact across adulthood.
Martin Kuška
added a research item
Emotional creativity (EC) is a pattern of cognitive abilities and personality traits related to originality and appropriateness in emotional experience. EC has been found to be related to various constructs across different fields of psychology during the past 30 years, but a comprehensive examination of previous research is still lacking. The goal of this review is to explore the reliability of use of the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI) across studies, to test gender differences and to compare levels of EC in different countries. Thirty-five empirical studies focused on EC were retrieved and the coefficients required for the meta-analysis extracted. The meta-analysis revealed that women showed significantly higher EC than men (total N = 3,555). The same gender differences were also found when testing scores from three ECI subscales, i.e. emotional novelty, emotional preparedness and emotional effectiveness/authenticity. When comparing EC in 10 different countries (total N = 4,375), several cross-cultural differences were revealed. The Chinese sample showed a significantly lower average ECI total score than all the other countries. Based on the integration of results, the avenues for future research on EC and the breadth of influence of the concept of EC across different fields of psychology are discussed. Keywords: Emotional Creativity, Review, Meta-Analyses, Meta-Analysis, Definition, Emotional Creativity Inventory, ECI, Reliability, Gender Differences, Cross-cultural, Cross-culture, Personality Traits, NEO Personality Inventory, Big Five, Extraversion, Agreeableness, Openness to Experience, Introversion, Neuroticism, Emotions, Creativity, Cognition, Cognitive Abilities, Affect, Fantasy, Coping, Alexithymia, Anhedonia, Self-understanding, Motivation, Creativeness, Innovative Performance, Creative Ability, Artistic Creativity, Creative Thinking. MeSH Headings: Emotions, Creativity, Affect, Affective Symptoms, Gender, Sex, Gender Identity, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Transcultural Studies, Temperament, Extraversion, Neuroticism, Anhedonia, Creativeness, Cognition, Cognitive Function, Artistic Creativity, Creative Ability, Creative Thinking
Radek Trnka
added 2 research items
Little is known about the relationship between emotional creativity and age-related cognitive decline. This study explored how deficits in some cognitive abilities are related to emotional creativity, i.e., cognitive abilities relating to originality and appropriateness in emotional experience. One hundred and eighty-seven older adults (mean age = 63.2; 58.4% females) were administered the Emotional Creativity Inventory, the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale, and the Cognitive Complaint Interview. As hypothesized, emotional creativity was negatively related to apathy and positively to disinhibition/emotional dysregulation. Several processes, such as apathy-related loss of interest, unconcern, subjective lack of energy, and changed perception of one’s disinhibited emotional reactions, may explain the observed results. Keywords: Emotions, Creativity, Emotional Creativity, Older Adults, Cognitive Dysfunction, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Cognitive Decline, Cognitive Impairments, Mental Deterioration, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Mild Neurocognitive Disorder, Affective Symptoms, Emotional Disturbances, Affect, Feelings, Creative Ability, Creative Thinking, Creativeness, Aging, Cognitive Deficits. MeSH Headings: Emotions, Creativity, Cognitive Dysfunction, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Affective Symptoms, Affect
The role of emotional creativity in practicing creative leisure activities and in the preference of college majors remains unknown. This study aims to explore how emotional creativity measured by the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI; Averill, 1999) is interrelated with the real-life involvement in different types of specific creative leisure activities and with four categories of college majors. Data were collected from 251 university students, university graduates, and young adults (156 women and 95 men). Art students and graduates scored significantly higher on the ECI than other majors. Humanities scored significantly higher than technical/economic majors. Five creative leisure activities were significantly correlated with the ECI, specifically, writing, painting, composing music, performing drama, and do-it-yourself home improvement. Keywords: Creativity, Emotional Creativity, Emotions, Creativeness, Affect, Feelings, Leisure Activities, Creative Ability, Artistic Creativity, Creative Thinking, Creativeness, Aging, Cognitive Deficits, Performance. MeSH Headings: Emotions, Creativity, Leisure, Leisure Activities, Hobbies, Recreation, Affect Affective Symptoms, Creativeness
Radek Trnka
added a project goal
This project aims to explore the various facets of emotional creativity, which is the ability to experience and express original, appropriate, and authentic combinations of emotions. The project started in 2013, when we explored if people who are highly emotionally creative are also more engaged in creative leisure activities such as writing blogs, poems or prose, inventing, performing drama or dance improvisations, composing music, etc. In 2016, the results were published in the Creativity Research Journal (28/3,348-356):
Recently, we have focused our attention on examining the diagnostic potential of the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI, Averill, 1999) for the assessment of cognitive decline in late adulthood. Current research on emotional aging shows that many neurodegenerative diseases can be diagnosed in their early stages using a proper psychological assessment. The results of our initial study conducted on a population of 187 older adults indicate that cognitive decline causes significant changes in emotional creativity:
(2019, Creativity Research Journal, 31/1, 93-101)
This project is still ongoing and our team is open to any comments, cooperation, or joint publishing.
Keywords: Emotions, Creativity, Emotional Creativity, Cognitive Dysfunction, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Cognitive Decline, Cognitive Impairments, Mental Deterioration, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Mild Neurocognitive Disorder, Affective Symptoms, Emotional Disturbances, Affect, Feelings, Leisure Activities, Creative Ability, Artistic Creativity, Creative Thinking, Creativeness, Aging, Cognitive Deficits
MeSH Headings: Emotions, Creativity, Cognitive Dysfunction, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Affective Symptoms, Leisure Activities, Affect